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IT Professional

Issue 3 • Date May-June 2001

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Displaying Results 1 - 21 of 21
  • IEEE 802.11: moving closer to practical wireless LANs

    Page(s): 17 - 23
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (606 KB)  

    Although the IEEE 802.11 standard has been around since 1997, work continues to make it more adaptable to the demand for higher data rates and true wireless flexibility. Until recently, few organizations used wireless LANs because they cost too much, their data rates were too low, they posed occupational safety problems because of concerns about the health effects of electromagnetic radiation, and the spectrum used required a license. Today, these problems have largely diminished, and wireless LAN popularity is skyrocketing. Wireless LANs must meet requirements typical of any LAN. They must also meet requirements specific to their intended environment. IEEE 802.11 defines several services that the wireless LAN must provide if its usefulness is to match the functionality inherent in wired LANs. IEEE 802.11 is poised to have a significant impact on the LAN marketplace. As the demand for mobility and freedom from wiring requirements increases, the standard offers a comprehensive yet flexible approach to wireless LAN products. View full abstract»

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  • Got WAP? [Book Review]

    Page(s): 53
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (168 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Building up your SAN [Book Review]

    Page(s): 54
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (230 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Taking care of VPN business [Book Review]

    Page(s): 54
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (230 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Stopping the tower of babble [Book Review]

    Page(s): 55
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (175 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Network design help [Book Review]

    Page(s): 55
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (175 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Making your network airtight [Book Review]

    Page(s): 56
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (209 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Exposing the hackers [Book Review]

    Page(s): 56
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (209 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The battle for encryption [Book Review]

    Page(s): 57
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (194 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Intruder alert! [Book Review]

    Page(s): 57
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (194 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Keep it simple on the web [Book Review]

    Page(s): 58
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (129 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Web design with the user in mind [Book Review]

    Page(s): 59
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (180 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The how-to of IIS4 [Book Review]

    Page(s): 59
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (180 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Speeding Up CRM [Book Review]

    Page(s): 60
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (257 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Getting started with IT asset management

    Page(s): 37 - 40
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (296 KB)  

    Asset management is a combination of tools and processes that proactively manage a company's entire asset base from a cost, contractual, support, and inventory viewpoint. This definition stems from the basics of a company's business functions; several common threads lead to a fundamental definition. At the root of business you find a basic equation: assets+people=profits. Since this equation underlies basic business fundamentals, business managers must support each aspect of the equation, and asset management tools and processes must address each area. Companies must possess certain competencies to maximize their effectiveness in each area. Ownership data allows companies to look at their asset base from a strategic business perspective. Help desk and deployment tools remain tactical tools to solve today's problems. Separately or together they do not constitute asset management. To truly manage assets we need all three competencies. Help desks support people and deployment tools support the assets. Ownership management tools support the process by maximizing asset use while lowering the cost of ownership View full abstract»

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  • Assessing Web-enabled call center technologies

    Page(s): 24 - 30
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1136 KB)  

    E-commerce's explosive growth has seen corporate Web sites mature from electronic versions of glossy brochures to full-service storefronts. To support this new environment, companies are providing real-time customer service to their Web customers. Despite this tremendous e-commerce growth, many people remain reluctant to complete a Web transaction without first talking to a live agent. Corporations are linking their Web sites to call centers where pools of trained agents can assist Web shoppers that need help in real time. To provide Web visitors with instant customer service, retailers are adding a talk-to-agent button on Web pages. When a visitor presses the button, the Web site will present the caller with several options for actuary talking to an agent. These options include e-mail, text chat, agent callback, and Internet telephony. There are two main technology alternatives that a call center can implement for Web integration. The first technology enables a traditional call center that has circuit-switched-based systems to support talk-to-agent alternatives. The second technology is the implementation of an all-IP call center infrastructure. Mitretek's Call Center Lab has assessed several products View full abstract»

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  • Sizing up today's lightweight software processes

    Page(s): 46 - 49
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (628 KB)  

    There is a buzz about the new lightweight software development processes. These processes are certainly capable of creating successful software systems faster. As a software developer, which one should you choose for your project? Indeed, today's software development processes bring interesting dynamics to the projects to which developers apply them. But should process drive the project or should the project determine the process? I examine one characteristic of these processes, scalability, which can help you decide what process is best for you View full abstract»

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  • Myths about outsourcing to application service providers

    Page(s): 32 - 35
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (180 KB)  

    Which applications are organizations outsourcing to ASPs? What did they hope to gain? And what are the critical success factors for organizations using ASPs? To assess these issues we cosponsored a study to assess organizational attitudes and adoption metrics for ASPs. Our survey garnered 256 usable responses from businesses regarding their use of ASPs. The study indicated that a significant number of respondents believed ASPs offer a fast-track way of implementing IT projects. However, 80 percent also favored internal implementation for core IT projects, which suggests that other factors still present a substantial barrier to ASP adoption. Nevertheless, companies are outsourcing some core applications - such as supply chain management and e-commerce - and several non-core applications. This outsourcing implies that companies perceive a significant benefit to ASP adoption. The message for users is unambiguous: to succeed, understand how Internet outsourcing works for your company, benchmark against successful ASP adopters, and establish a common criterion for evaluating an ASP View full abstract»

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  • Wireless messaging: ready to take center stage in the US?

    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (184 KB)  

    After the initial hype, WAP, the wireless application protocol, aka the Wireless Internet, has disappointed many users. In the US, the wireless powers-that-be continue to look for wireless data service offerings to compete with voice as a revenue generator. Wireless messaging services have yet to take hold in the US, despite their success in Japan and Europe; the author gives some reasons why View full abstract»

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  • A planning framework far implementing virtual private networks

    Page(s): 41 - 44
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (620 KB)  

    Because there is no single virtual private network (VPN) solution, it's critical to have a planning framework to ensure successful deployment. A VPN is virtual in that it has no corresponding physical network but rather shares physical circuits with other traffic. A VPN is private in that it isolates Internet traffic with routing and secures if with encryption. The use of “private” and “Internet based“ to describe the same service appears to be an oxymoron, but we explain how VPNs manage to be both. Many choices will confront you in considering how to deploy a VPN. We briefly describe the core choices such as the different types of VPNs, encryption, firewalls, and how to accommodate legacy systems. Each distinct VPN solution has its own strengths, weaknesses, and price tag; IT professionals must weigh these characteristics against business requirements View full abstract»

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  • The consultancy approach to aligning business and IT

    Page(s): 12 - 15
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (312 KB)  

    Some see a decentralized consultancy approach to IT as a way to be more responsive to business needs. The relationship between IT and business is seemingly an age-old problem, but new thinking, changes in organizational structures, and new business mandates may finally align these seemingly disparate partners. New ways for IT to be structured within the enterprise include deploying staff within a specific business department or assigning them to a finite project team within a particular business unit. Often, accomplishing this sort of restructuring involves significant cultural and structural changes within the organization, which makes some executives and personnel uneasy. The ultimate goal is to benefit the business; IT must adapt to fit the organization's goals View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IT Professional is a bimonthly publication of the IEEE Computer Society for the developers and managers of enterprise information systems.

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Editor-in-Chief
San Murugesan
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