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MultiMedia, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date July-Sept. 2001

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Displaying Results 1 - 16 of 16
  • Creating a high school physics video based laboratory

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 78 - 86
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (903 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We integrated our physics video-based laboratory with a hypertext system that contains the curricula of a high school physics course. We aim to create a pedagogic tool that includes the theoretical and experimental aspects of a physics course. Here we present the development methodology, the final software structure, the experiments we analyzed, and the results we obtained. View full abstract»

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  • Building successful human-centered systems [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 102 - 103
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Reusable multimedia content in Web based learning systems

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 30 - 38
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (596 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We discuss reusability aspects of interactive multimedia content in Web based learning systems. In contrast to existing approaches, we extend a component based architecture to build interactive multimedia visualizations by using metadata for reusability issues. The experiment we conducted shows how to reuse the same visualization in different learning contexts View full abstract»

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  • Transforming large scale product documents into multimedia training manuals

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 39 - 45
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (992 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Current authoring tools have limitations in creating large-scale product training documents in a timely manner because of labor-intensive and time-consuming authoring processes. We present an automated authoring method based on a formal specification for dynamically generating ISO DSSSL document styles. From the generated styles, we transform the existing storage-based product documents into large-scale presentation-based product training manuals View full abstract»

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  • Spies, thieves, and lies: the battle for multimedia in the digital era

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 8 - 12
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (284 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Multimedia security has become an immediate concern for content providers, artists, and the entertainment industry. The apparent panic over the need for an effective mechanism for digital media rights protection echoes in many of today's news stories. The fundamental cause for this frenzy is the leakage problem. The leakage problem involves the illegal duplication, unlawful tampering, and wrongful distribution of media. Because of the popularity of handheld digital cameras, online news magazines, and movies on digital versatile disk (DVD), traditional forms of analog media are being replaced with new digital counterparts. Advances in digital media storage, duplication, editing, and transmission technologies have made this alternative more flexible, scalable, and cost effective for emerging applications. Ironically, however, these same appealing conveniences have facilitated large-scale piracy of and unlawful tampering with digital content. Because of analog media's media, high-quality duplication is expensive and therefore inaccessible to the average consumer. Despite new legislation by governments and the ongoing efforts of the entertainment and high-tech industries, there has been little progress in preventing multimedia theft and tampering View full abstract»

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  • Mobile multimedia

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 1
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    First Page of the Article
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  • Constructing a videophone for the hearing impaired using MPEG-4 tools

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 56 - 67
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (940 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The Lip Telephone is a special videoconferencing system built by the authors with tools provided by the MPEG-4 audio-visual standard. The videophone achieves high-fidelity representation in the area of the speaker's mouth, letting lip readers communicate over a standard telephone connection or the Internet View full abstract»

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  • High-bandwidth interface for multimedia communications over fixed wireless systems

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 87 - 95
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (184 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Over the past two decades, cable television has largely supplanted over-the-air broadcast as a TV distribution medium. Several years ago, enterprising companies concluded that they could leverage the extremely wide bandwidth of cable TV systems required to deliver broadcast-quality television as a high-speed conduit for broadband data communications. This led to the birth of the cable modem. Early cable-modem equipment was vendor proprietary, so interoperability between different vendors' products was largely nonexistent. To promote interoperability, Cable Labs (the cable TV industry research arm) developed the Data Over Cable Service Interface Specification (DOCSIS 1.0), an IP-centric, point-to-multipoint standard that quickly replaced the proprietary solutions that preceded it. DOCSIS has now become the accepted cable standard. The newly released DOCSIS 1.1 is destined to play an important role in the delivery of high-quality multimedia across fixed wireless communications networks. With this approach, we can take advantage of all the DOCSIS technology modules that exist in the market today, allowing the wireless platform to migrate toward emerging services such as Internet protocol multicasting and voice over IP (VoIP). We describe the state of current technologies that have made fixed-wireless access a viable and compelling choice. We also discuss some emerging technologies that will bring exciting new fixed-wireless services and capabilities into homes and small businesses in the near future View full abstract»

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  • An online tutoring system for language translation

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 46 - 55
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (356 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Our interactive intelligent language tutoring system acquires Japanese-English technical translations over the Internet. The system consists of an augmented transition network-based template, a global-matching algorithm embedded in the template structure, a parts-of-speech tagged parser, and a visual interface authoring tool. Acquiring key English patterns greatly simplifies the template structure, which effectively controls an exponential explosion in the number of possible combinations inherent in many natural language applications View full abstract»

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  • Embodying robotic art: cybernetic cinematics

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 4 - 7
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (460 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    If cinema is one of the last machines to come out of the mechanical age, then its legacy of targeting “the mind through the senses” continues in a newer electronic and mechanical art form: gestural robotics. Gestural robotics harnesses microcontrollers and mechanical devices to create sculptural art. Like cinema, it uses a technical framework and repetition to embody ideas and emotions. Each form asks us to harness our ability to suspend disbelief, pointing to the primacy of our internal dialogues and imaginations. The similarities between these two art forms, although separated by leaps in technology, modes of presentation, and historical distance, signals our continued ability to connect with all the facets of our environment. Collectively, the two reinforce the increasingly wide range of creative expressions we've carved out for ourselves, negating anxieties about the isolation of our increasingly technological environment. We persist in developing both mechanical and technological items in ways that affect our society. However, we codify an art form by its basic parameters. In cinema, it was the finessing of stills to perfection in motion; in robotics, it is the microcontrollers that let a work of art exist autonomously, away from the computer. The art of gestural robotics takes a fresh look at the mechanical. It appreciates the technical in a way that goes beyond the information, analogous to the way film takes on a dimension beyond its 30 frames per second View full abstract»

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  • Collaborative learning with the distributed building site metaphor

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 21 - 29
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (232 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The authors describe a new approach to interactive and collaborative learning in an industrial training environment. Users learn in the 3D world where multiple instructors can observe, advise, and correct in real time. Our distributed building site metaphor provides distribution services for sharing a virtual world and enables different collaboration styles View full abstract»

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  • Diminishing the distance in distance education

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 18 - 20
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (60 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
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  • Thinner, smaller, better: advances in display technology

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 16 - 17
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (52 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
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  • Multimedia standards: building blocks of the Web

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 13 - 15
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (56 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    These days in multimedia, there are many standards for composing multimedia on the Web, but now rather than choosing one, you use all of them together. Proliferations of standards, by no means unique to multimedia, always bring about analogies with the Tower of Babel. With the old version of the joke, developers wrote multimedia presentations in different formats for different browsers, so they weren't portable. This degenerated into a world of presentations and systems that couldn't communicate with each other, and the idea of one language for all was lost. In the new age of cooperative formats, we are still surrounded by many different languages, but we must understand them all at once. As we struggle to build our ziggurat to the heaven of an all-reaching and all-knowing multimedia based Web, we should stop and ponder if the effort will crumble under its own mass and complexity or if the goal is even reachable. On the other hand, we can compare this effort to the space shuttle: a system that successfully combines the many different and complex interwoven components needed to build a stairway to the heavens. So far, the media standardization effort has been working, with the emerging formats for the most part having successful implementation and adoption. In the author's opinion, he presents the steps in the proverbial multimedia stairway so far View full abstract»

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  • Digital-video management for heterogeneous and distributed resources

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 96 - 101
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (396 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A digital-video management project dealing with segmentation, annotation, retrieval, and other related topics has been active for several years at the Microgravity Advanced Research Support (MARS) Center, in Naples, Italy. Our research is part of a field that studies methods of representing and integrating heterogeneous information in distributed, Web environments. In this context, each genre of digital video (such as news, television shows, documentaries, and cultural heritage videos) presents its knowledge in different forms and structures. Furthermore, for each genre, various methodologies and schools of thought exist that structure the knowledge in digital videos differently. For example, in the field of cinematographic theory, different methods of film segmentation exist, and for those in the cultural-heritage field, how they classify objects in different videos depends on the classification criteria in each country. The authors wish to emphasize the idea of an agent as a resource in RDF (Resource Description Framework). They believe that it constitutes a solution that goes beyond the digital-video domain and that researchers can apply it to most types of Web resources View full abstract»

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  • Multimedia services for distant work and education in an IP/ATM environment

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 68 - 77
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (500 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We developed, tested, and evaluated multimedia distant education applications running over an IPv6/ATM-based broadband access network. We improved the quality of service and adapted a set of distance education applications-including Digital Video Library, Virtual Workspace, and video-audio conferencing tools-to work over IPv6 and let users control the QoS View full abstract»

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The magazine contains technical information covering a broad range of issues in multimedia systems and applications

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
John R. Smith
IBM T.J. Watson Research Center