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IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering

Issue 7 • Jul 2001

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Displaying Results 1 - 5 of 5
  • Automatic analysis of consistency between requirements and designs

    Publication Year: 2001, Page(s):651 - 672
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (700 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Writing requirements in a formal notation permits automatic assessment of such properties as ambiguity, consistency, and completeness. However, verifying that the properties expressed in requirements are preserved in other software life cycle artifacts remains difficult. The existing techniques either require substantial manual effort and skill or suffer from exponential explosion of the number of... View full abstract»

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  • The confounding effect of class size on the validity of object-oriented metrics

    Publication Year: 2001, Page(s):630 - 650
    Cited by:  Papers (155)  |  Patents (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (408 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Much effort has been devoted to the development and empirical validation of object-oriented metrics. The empirical validations performed thus far would suggest that a core set of validated metrics is close to being identified. However, none of these studies allow for the potentially confounding effect of class size. We demonstrate a strong size confounding effect and question the results of previo... View full abstract»

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  • A tool to help tune where computation is performed

    Publication Year: 2001, Page(s):618 - 629
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (296 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    We introduce a new performance metric, called load balancing factor (LBF), to assist programmers when evaluating different tuning alternatives. The LBF metric differs from traditional performance metrics since it is intended to measure the performance implications of a specific tuning alternative rather than quantifying where time is spent in the current version of the program. A second unique asp... View full abstract»

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  • Foundations of the trace assertion method of module interface specification

    Publication Year: 2001, Page(s):577 - 598
    Cited by:  Papers (16)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (460 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The trace assertion method is a formal state machine based method for specifying module interfaces. A module interface specification treats the module as a black-box, identifying all the module's access programs (i.e., programs that can be invoked from outside of the module) and describing their externally visible effects. In the method, both the module states and the behaviors observed are fully ... View full abstract»

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  • Simulation-verification: biting at the state explosion problem

    Publication Year: 2001, Page(s):599 - 617
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (376 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Simulation and verification are two conventional techniques for the analysis of specifications of real-time systems. While simulation is relatively inexpensive in terms of execution time, it only validates the behavior of a system for one particular computation path. On the other hand, verification provides guarantees over the entire set of computation paths of a system, but is, in general, very e... View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tse-eic@computer.org