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Internet Computing, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date May-June 2001

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Displaying Results 1 - 12 of 12
  • Integrating knowledge on the Web

    Page(s): 32 - 39
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (241 KB)  

    The World Wide Web provides a ubiquitous medium for seamlessly integrating distributed applications, formats and content, making it well-suited for enterprise knowledge management. In this article, we discuss a framework for characterizing knowledge management technology. We identify the desirable attributes of a knowledge management system and describe how Web-centric approaches can support these requirements. We also review related research in enterprise knowledge management. View full abstract»

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  • Securing XML documents with Author-X

    Page(s): 21 - 31
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (524 KB)  

    Author-X is a Java-based system that addresses the security issues of access control and policy design for XML document administration. Author-X supports the specification of policies at varying granularity levels and the specification of user credentials as a way to enforce access control. Access control is available according to both push and pull document distribution policies, and document updates are distributed through a combination of hash functions and digital signature techniques. The Author-X approach to distributed updates allows a user to verify a document's integrity without contacting the document server View full abstract»

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  • Philosophical agents

    Page(s): 104 - 106
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (104 KB)  

    Abstraction is the technique we use to deal with complexity. What is the proper kind and level of abstraction for complex software agents? We think it would be reasonable to endow agents with a philosophy. Then, by understanding their philosophies, we can use them more effectively. To endow agents with ethical principles, developers need an architecture that supports explicit goals, principles and capabilities, as well as laws and ways to sanction or punish miscreants. All of the ethical approaches described in this article are single-agent in orientation and encode other agents implicitly View full abstract»

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  • Sharing health-care records over the Internet

    Page(s): 49 - 58
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (408 KB)  

    Presents a novel approach to sharing electronic health-care records that leverages the Internet and the World Wide Web, developed as part of two European Commission-funded projects, Synapses and SynEx. The approach provides an integrated view of patient data from heterogeneous, distributed information systems and presents it to users electronically. Synapses and SynEx illustrate a generic approach in applying Internet technologies for viewing shared records, integrated with existing health computing environments. Prototypes have been validated in a variety of clinical domains and health-care settings View full abstract»

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  • Bluetooth: technology for short-range wireless apps

    Page(s): 96 - 103
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (144 KB)  

    In 1998, five major companies (Ericsson, Nokia, IBM, Toshiba and Intel) formed a group to create a license-free technology for universal wireless connectivity in the handheld market. The result is Bluetooth, a technology named after a 10th-Century king who brought warring Viking tribes under a common rule. The Bluetooth specifications (currently in version 1.1) define a radiofrequency (RF) wireless communication interface and the associated set of communication protocols and usage profiles. The link speed, communication range and transmission power level for Bluetooth were chosen to support low-cost, power-efficient, single-chip implementations of the current technology. In fact, Bluetooth is the first attempt at making a single-chip radio that can operate in the 2.4-GHz ISM (industrial, scientific and medical) RF band. While most early Bluetooth solutions are dual-chip, vendors have recently announced single-chip versions as well. In this overview of the technology, I first describe the lower layers of the Bluetooth protocol stack. I also briefly describe its service discovery protocol and, finally, how the layers of the protocol stack fit together from an application's point of view View full abstract»

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  • The Careflow architecture. A case study in medical transcription

    Page(s): 59 - 64
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (304 KB)  

    The Careflow architecture uses Java and CORBA to streamline transcription at many hospitals and clinics. In this article, I explore the evolution of this middleware solution for automating the archiving, versioning and routing of documents in transcription. After a brief overview of transcription, I explain the project's architectural goals and describe three successive versions that our team developed. Finally, I explore lessons learned and reasons for changes to the system over the past decade View full abstract»

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  • Bringing health-care applications to the Internet

    Page(s): 42 - 48
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (208 KB)  

    A United States study of health-care applications in relation to Internet capabilities found distinct, if not unique, requirements for the Internet's evolutionary development. Many health-related processes stand to be reshaped by the Internet. This paper presents a broad overview of the types of applications that the Internet can support in five areas: consumer health, clinical care, financial and administrative transactions, public health, and biomedical research. It also considers the technical challenges View full abstract»

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  • JXTA: a network programming environment

    Page(s): 88 - 95
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (140 KB)  

    JXTA technology, from Sun Microsystems, is a network programming and computing platform that is designed to solve a number of problems in modern distributed computing, especially in the area broadly referred to as peer-to-peer (P2P) computing or P2P networking. JXTA provides a network programming platform specifically designed to be the foundation for P2P systems. As a set of protocols, the technology stays away from APIs and remains independent of programming languages. This means that heterogeneous devices with completely different software stacks can interoperate through JXTA protocols. JXTA technology is also independent of transport protocols. It can be implemented on top of TCP/IP, HTTP, Bluetooth, HomePNA, and many other protocols View full abstract»

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  • Digital steganography: hiding data within data

    Page(s): 75 - 80
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (380 KB)  

    Digital steganography is the art of inconspicuously hiding data within data. Steganography's goal in general is to hide data well enough that unintended recipients do not suspect the steganographic medium of containing hidden data. The software and links mentioned in this article are just a sample of the steganography tools currently available. As privacy concerns continue to develop along with the digital communication domain, steganography will undoubtedly play a growing role in society. For this reason, it is important that we are aware of digital steganography technology and its implications. Equally important are the ethical concerns of using steganography and steganalysis. Steganography enhances rather than replaces encryption. Messages are not secure simply by virtue of being hidden. Likewise, steganography is not about keeping your message from being known - it's about keeping its existence from being known View full abstract»

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  • Collaborative surgical simulation over the Internet

    Page(s): 65 - 73
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (988 KB)  

    Co-Surgeon is an Internet-based tele-simulation surgery system. The system combines 3D surgery simulation with CSCW technology to enable surgeons to collaboratively simulate alternative treatment plans over the Internet. It enables multiple users in remote locations to manipulate 3D anatomical models and to simulate surgical operations while sharing a view of the simulation. In addition, the system can store the simulated procedure so that offline users can later replay it and participate asynchronously. Co-Surgeon can also manage the procedures, facilitating the use of the simulation capability and widening the system's application in surgical education and reference. This article describes Co-Surgeon's design and implementation, and reports results from laboratory tests of a prototype system View full abstract»

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  • Autoconfiguration for IP networking: enabling local communication

    Page(s): 81 - 86
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (124 KB)  

    IP hosts and network infrastructure have historically been difficult to configure, but emerging networking protocols promise to enable hosts to establish IP networks without prior configuration or network services. Even very simple devices with few computing resources will be able to communicate via standard protocols wherever they are attached. Current IETF (Internet Engineering Task Force) standardization efforts, such as those in the Zeroconf Working Group, aim to make this form of networking simple and inexpensive. In this tutorial, I examine the background, current status and future prospects for zero-configuration networking View full abstract»

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Editor-in-Chief
Michael Rabinovich
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Case Western Reserve University