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Robotics & Automation Magazine, IEEE

Issue 2 • Date June 2001

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Displaying Results 1 - 7 of 7
  • Mechatronics education [Guest editorial]

    Page(s): 4
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Integrating mechatronics into a mechanical engineering curriculum

    Page(s): 35 - 38
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (236 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present what we believe is a more manageable approach to enhancing a mechatronics-based mechanical engineering program-a stepwise method to restructure a traditional mechanical engineering curriculum with a mechatronics theme. The result can be a curriculum with contemporary emphasis, enhanced content, and improved sequencing and coupling of traditional topics including modeling and analysis, computing, electrical circuits and machines, measurements and instrumentation, control theory, and design. Mechatronics provides a natural focus for this restructuring and creates an opportunity to better connect and utilize interesting exercises and design experiences throughout the curriculum. The proposed restructuring method consists of four evolutionary steps that allow manageable incremental changes that can be reasonably coordinated with faculty and laboratory development. View full abstract»

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  • Learning while doing: practical robotics education

    Page(s): 39 - 43
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (416 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The students of today are likely to see current advanced products as black boxes. However, trying to open the black boxes is crucially important for the students who are going to be researchers or technical experts. Based on this idea, the curriculum of our department concerning practical robotics education was planned to cultivate the fundamental spirit of students for designing/manufacturing valuable products. In the article, first the basic concepts of practical engineering education are presented. Second, the outline of classes for practical education at the Department of Robotics in Ritsumeikan University are described, including experiments in robotics using 3 degree-of-freedom (DOF) and 6-DOF manipulators and practices of robot making. Then, practical education for a cooperative academia-industry environment is described. Such an education should contribute to the production of valuable products and to the transfer of advanced technologies to industry View full abstract»

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  • Is anything really new in mechatronics education?

    Page(s): 12 - 19
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    Yes, there is something new in the way mechanical engineers are expected to design and in the way professors must now teach design. To illustrate how one institution is helping mechanical engineers to become mechatronics engineers, the article describes the undergraduate program in mechatronics at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and in particular, the integration of the theory covered in lectures with the laboratory exercises. The hardware systems used in both courses are described. Also discussed are observations from conducting professional training in mechatronics both in industry and for the ASME Professional Development Program View full abstract»

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  • Grasping the interdisciplinarity of mechatronics

    Page(s): 27 - 34
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    The two technical universities of Switzerland, the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology of Lausanne (EPTL) and Zurich (ETHZ), have a long tradition in mechatronics education. One successful part of this education at ETHZ is a lecture called Smart Product Design with a main emphasis on hands-on experience. Apart from providing the basics of mechatronics, the students work on a real mobile robot system during the course. Each student team receives a mobile robot kit, based on a Motorola 68332 microcontroller. Each year's course ends with a competition between the fully autonomous robots of the interdisciplinary student teams. In the recent years' competitions the students had to build robots to autonomously construct towers, to play golf or soccer, or to collect Lego students to bring them to school. The article briefly discusses the important aspects of mechatronics education and then focuses on the Smart Product Design course at ETHZ, discussing the lecture, the laboratory work, and the experience gained during the last eight years View full abstract»

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  • “Competing” for a robotics education

    Page(s): 44 - 55
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    A strategy for integrating robot design competitions into courses in order to maximize learning experience and promote intellectual development is presented. The use of competitions fosters students' intellectual maturity, showing, inter alia, that there may be more than one correct answer to a problem View full abstract»

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  • The science and education of mechatronics engineering

    Page(s): 20 - 26
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    We try to get to the heart of multidisciplinary engineering, of which mechatronics is an excellent example, and point out how the integration of disciplines leads to new degrees of freedom in design and corresponding research directions that otherwise would not have been investigated. This is the major contribution achieved by a multidisciplinary approach to engineering science; it leads to a new important research field and at the same time helps to push research in related fields into new fruitful directions. We point to a number of areas that have benefited from the interdisciplinary perspective and a focus on interactions between disciplines including: engineering curriculum; mechatronics research; control of nonlinear mechanical systems; real time control systems modelling; and time varying control systems View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Robotics and Automation Magazine is a unique technology publication which is peer-reviewed, readable and substantive.  The Magazine is a forum for articles which fall between the academic and theoretical orientation of scholarly journals and vendor sponsored trade publications.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Eugenio Guglielmelli
Laboratory of Biomedical Robotics
      and Biomicrosystems
Universita' Campus Bio-Medico
      di Roma