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Micro, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date May/Jun 2001

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Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • A survey of configurable, component-based operating systems for embedded applications

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 54 - 68
    Cited by:  Papers (10)  |  Patents (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (172 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Component-based software is becoming an increasingly popular technology as a means for creating complex software systems by assembling off-the-shelf building blocks. However, many of the component-based methodologies that use large components fail to address issues of size, real-time performance, power, and cost, as well as problems associated with the configuration process itself. These issues are critical for using components in embedded systems View full abstract»

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  • Hardware/software cost analysis of interrupt processing strategies

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 69 - 76
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (108 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A new study compares the architectural design and implementation costs of five strategies that let pipelined processors support precise interrupts. Hardware dominates the cost of all strategies except checkpoint repair, which, depending on the implementation, can incur either high software or hardware costs View full abstract»

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  • Wearable information devices

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 12 - 15
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (384 KB)  

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  • The wearARM modular, low-power computing core

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 16 - 28
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (280 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The wearARM computing core for wearable applications uses highly miniaturized, mechanically flexible electronic packaging technology. Used with the MIThril platform, the system supports high-performance, low-power, user configurable wearable computing with wireless connectivity and local mass storage View full abstract»

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  • Sensory-augmented computing: wearing the museum's guide

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 44 - 52
    Cited by:  Papers (8)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (468 KB)  

    Personal computers have not lived up to their name. Most machines sit on a desk and interact with users for only a small fraction of the day. Notebook computers have become smaller and faster, enabling mobility but the same staid user paradigm persists. Typically you must stop everything you're doing, use both hands, and give the computer your full attention. Wearable computing is poised to shatter our preconceptions of how we should use a computer. A personal computer should be worn like eyeglasses or clothing and continuously interact with the user on the basis of context. With heads-up (head-mounted) displays, unobtrusive input devices, personal wireless local area networks, and a host of other context-sensing and communication tools, wearable computers may act as intelligent assistants. It is argued that a wearable computing device that perceives its surroundings and presents multimedia information through a heads-up display can behave like an intelligent assistant to fulfill the promise of personal computing View full abstract»

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  • Energy scavenging with shoe-mounted piezoelectrics

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 30 - 42
    Cited by:  Papers (211)  |  Patents (29)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (812 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Decreasing size and power requirements of wearable microelectronics make it possible to replace batteries with systems that capture energy from the user's environment. Unobtrusive devices developed at the MIT Media Lab scavenge electricity from the forces exerted on a shoe during walking: a flexible piezoelectric foil stave to harness sole-bending energy and a reinforced PZT dimorph to capture heel-strike energy View full abstract»

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High-quality technical articles from designers, systems integrators, and users discussing the design, performance, or application of microcomputer and microprocessor systems.

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Editor-in-Chief
Erik R. Altman
School of Electrical and Computer Engineering
IBM T.J. Watson Research Center