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Communications Magazine, IEEE

Issue 6 • Date June 2001

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Displaying Results 1 - 24 of 24
  • Telephone switching systems [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 20 - 22
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • OSPF complete implementation [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 22 - 24
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Digital modulation techniques [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 24 - 28
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • OpenCable

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 98 - 105
    Cited by:  Papers (6)  |  Patents (12)
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    The OpenCable initiative defines a structured approach to standardizing and opening up cable networks from their original proprietary roots. We review the primary drivers for OpenCable and discuss the functional requirements for OpenCable systems. OpenCable defines a number of key components (the OpenCable set-top and the point of deployment (POD) security module) and interfaces (at the head-end, at the network edge, and within the home environment). These are described along with the consensus-building OpenCable process used to define a set of industry standards for modern cable television networks. View full abstract»

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  • Errata

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 174
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  • Enhanced membership programs of ComSoc

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 69 - 72
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  • Spontaneous networking: an application oriented approach to ad hoc networking

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 176 - 181
    Cited by:  Papers (32)
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    An ad hoc network must operate independent of a preestablished or centralized network management infrastructure, while still providing administrative services needed to support applications. Address allocation, name resolution, service location, authentication, and access control policies represent just some of the functionality that must be supported-without preconfiguration or centralized services. In order to solve these problems, it is necessary to leverage some aspect of the environment in which the network operates. We introduce the notion of a spontaneous network, created when a group of people come together for some collaborative activity. In this case, we can use the human interactions associated with the activity in order to establish a basic service and security infrastructure. We structure our discussion around a practical real-world scenario illustrating the use of such a network, identifying the key challenges involved and some of the techniques that can be used to address them View full abstract»

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  • The emergence of middleware in home telecommunication equipment

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 106 - 110
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (11)
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    Cable will soon offer interactive television services. These will be joined in home networks by telephones, Internet appliances, and consumer electronic equipment. Middleware makes it possible to develop a large set of applications and to deliver them on many different hardware and software platforms. Middleware does this by providing such Web standards as HTML, ECMAScript, and Java to develop and deliver applications View full abstract»

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  • Protocols for multimedia systems - PROMS

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 71
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  • Virtual Internet broadcasting

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 182 - 188
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (13)
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    This article describes the design and first implementation of a virtual broadcast system whereby a multimedia content program can be edited, produced, and streamed from different locations. Data are stored and distributed decentrally, allowing multiple combinations of program objects to new programs. The virtual broadcast station is the network. This concept additionally offers the clients the opportunity to obtain an individual (personalized) program, still using bandwidth-economic multicast technologies. This is achieved by dividing multimedia streams into temporal chunks (chunk streams), streamed over different multicast host groups (distributed multicasting), using existing Internet session control protocols (SDP) and Internet transport protocols (RTP). A client application assembles the transmitted chunks to form an individual program. This technique can also be used to insert personal/local advertisements into broadcast-like services View full abstract»

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  • Self organization in mobile ad hoc networks: the approach of Terminodes

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 166 - 174
    Cited by:  Papers (99)  |  Patents (12)
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    The Terminodes project is designing a wide-area mobile ad hoc network which is meant to be used in a public environment; in our approach, the network is run by users themselves. We give a global description of the building blocks used by the basic operation of the network; they all rely on various concepts of self-organization. Routing uses a combination of geography-based information and local MANET-like protocols. Terminode positioning is obtained by either GPS or a relative positioning method. Mobility management uses self-organized virtual regions. Terminodes employ a form of virtual money called nuglets as an incentive to collaborate. Lastly, we discuss directions for providing some level of security View full abstract»

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  • Home networking and the CableHome project at CableLabs

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 112 - 121
    Cited by:  Papers (5)  |  Patents (11)
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    Home networking technologies and capabilities are receiving increased attention from consumers, software developers, hardware manufacturers, and service providers. Rapid innovation in home networking technology-advances in silicon, digital signal processing, and protocols-are improving the performance and lowering the cost of home network solutions. Cable system operators will depend on home networks for deployment of advanced services. The goal of the CableHome architecture is to establish a hone network environment within which the delivery of quality cable-based services can be ensured View full abstract»

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  • Maximum battery life routing to support ubiquitous mobile computing in wireless ad hoc networks

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 138 - 147
    Cited by:  Papers (289)  |  Patents (6)
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    Most ad hoc mobile devices today operate on batteries. Hence, power consumption becomes an important issue. To maximize the lifetime of ad hoc mobile networks, the power consumption rate of each node must be evenly distributed, and the overall transmission power for each connection request must be minimized. These two objectives cannot be satisfied simultaneously by employing routing algorithms proposed in previous work. We present a new power-aware routing protocol to satisfy these two constraints simultaneously; we also compare the performance of different types of power-related routing algorithms via simulation. Simulation results confirm the need to strike a balance in attaining service availability performance of the whole network vs. the lifetime of ad hoc mobile devices View full abstract»

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  • Improving UDP and TCP performance in mobile ad hoc networks with INSIGNIA

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 156 - 165
    Cited by:  Papers (22)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (912 KB)  

    There is a growing need to provide better service differentiation in mobile ad hoc networks; however, this is challenging. These networks are characterized as being multihop in nature where the wireless topology that interconnects mobile hosts/routers can change rapidly in unpredictable ways or remain relatively static over long periods of time. Power and bandwidth constrained, mobile ad hoc networks typically only support best effort communications where the transport protocol's “goodput” is often lower than the maximum radio transmission rate after encountering the effects of multiple access, fading, noise, and interference. We evaluate three routing protocols with INSIGNIA, an in-band signaling system that supports adaptive reservation-based services in mobile ad hoc networks. INSIGNIA represents a general-purpose approach to delivering quality of service in mobile ad hoc network supporting “operational transparency” between a number of IETF mobile ad hoc network routing protocols that include Ad Hoc On-Demand Distance Vector, Dynamic Source Routing, and the Temporally Ordered Routing Algorithm. We evaluate the performance gains delivered when using INSIGNIA with these MANET routing protocols in support of UDP and TCP traffic. The INSIGNIA ns-2 code used for the study reported in this article is available from the Web at comet.columbia.edu/insignia View full abstract»

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  • Cable television broadband network architectures

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 122 - 126
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    Fiber-deep network topologies will allow broadband service delivery to become a reality. This article discusses optical technology being deployed by the cable industry to support broadband. Included is a discussion of the current network and plans for the next-generation network, driving fiber even closer to the-subscriber View full abstract»

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  • Mobile and wireless Internet services: putting the pieces together

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 148 - 155
    Cited by:  Papers (15)
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    There are a variety of emerging technologies and protocol enhancements designed to extend Internet services to mobile users, including operation over more dynamic, heterogeneous wireless interconnections. Many different approaches and protocols have been proposed, and there are even multiple standardization efforts within the Internet Engineering Task Force that address portions of the overall goal. This article highlights some of the emerging technology efforts and provides insight into how some of these pieces may fit together to realize seamless Internet services for users on the move or in application spaces with little to no preexisting communications infrastructure View full abstract»

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  • Next generation networks initiative forms an industry and research consortium

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 71 - 72
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  • Internet design for SLA delivery from service level agreement to per-hop behavior: a report on the 1st TEQUILA workshop

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 70 - 72
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  • The emergence of integrated broadband cable networks

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 77 - 78
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    The basic attribute of capacity, now extended by a series of technical innovations, has transformed the crude cable platform into a powerful network capable of supplying advanced broadband telecommunications services to consumers. The author provides an outline of the technical migration that has taken place in cable over the past 10 years. This evolution can be summarized in three steps: fiber, digital, and packets. The first major architectural step occurred in the late 1980s. Single-mode fiber provided a way to replace the string of trunk amplifiers that were the cause of quality and reliability problems in cable. If the composite signal carrying 30-100 TV channels could be delivered into the coaxial network near the home, the trunk amplifiers could be eliminated. The development of analog lasers that could be AM modulated with very broadband signals (and perform at useful signal to noise margins) enabled the addition of fiber to the cable infrastructure. The cable network migrated to the hybrid fiber coax (HFC) structure that uses fiber to deliver signals to neighborhood nodes. From the nodes, the signals are redistributed to homes using the tree and branch coaxial plant previously in place View full abstract»

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  • An overview of cable modem technology and market perspectives

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 81 - 88
    Cited by:  Papers (5)  |  Patents (12)
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    Cable modem technology enables its users to access the Internet at line speeds of some 300 kb/s and above. It utilizes coaxial cables entering subscribers' premises to simultaneously deliver cable TV programs, access the Internet, and also provide voice telephony. This overview article describes the basic technology, its standardization, and the huge potential market worldwide View full abstract»

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  • Metrics for the customers of next-generation networks

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 14 - 18
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  • Does the IEEE 802.11 MAC protocol work well in multihop wireless ad hoc networks?

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 130 - 137
    Cited by:  Papers (375)  |  Patents (3)
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    The IEEE 802.11 MAC protocol is the standard for wireless LANs; it is widely used in testbeds and simulations for wireless multihop ad hoc networks. However, this protocol was not designed for multihop networks. Although it can support some ad hoc network architecture, it is not intended to support the wireless mobile ad hoc network, in which multihop connectivity is one of the most prominent features. In this article we focus on the following question: can the IEEE 802.11 MAC protocol function well in multihop networks? By presenting several serious problems encountered in an IEEE 802.11-based multihop network and revealing the in-depth cause of these problems, we conclude that the current version of this wireless LAN protocol does not function well in multihop ad hoc networks. We thus doubt whether the WaveLAN-based system is workable as a mobile ad hoc testbed View full abstract»

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  • Challenges in mobile ad hoc networking

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 129
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
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  • The PacketCable architecture

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 90 - 96
    Cited by:  Papers (4)  |  Patents (5)
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    PacketCableTM defines a multimedia system architecture that overlays a high-speed cable modem access network, with the goal of enabling a wide variety of Internet protocol-based multimedia services, such as voice over IP, unified messaging, PBX extension, videoconferencing, and online gaming. Currently, the architecture provides a complete solution for delivering VoIP services. We present the core capabilities necessary to implement such services in a scalable fashion. Next, we describe the major functional components that comprise the PacketCable architecture and illustrate how they work together to form an integrated IP multimedia-enabled system architecture, which is presently focused on voice over IP. Finally, we present some possible next steps in the evolution of PacketCable View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Communications Magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications systems (PCS), ISDN, and more.

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Editor-in-Chief
Osman Gebizlioglu
Huawei Technologies