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Information Technology in Biomedicine, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date June 2001

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Displaying Results 1 - 10 of 10
  • Three-dimensional virtual-reality surgical planning and soft-tissue prediction for orthognathic surgery

    Page(s): 97 - 107
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (806 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Complex maxillofacial malformations continue to present challenges in analysis and correction beyond modern technology. The purpose of this paper is to present a virtual reality workbench for surgeons to perform virtual orthognathic surgical planning and soft-tissue prediction in three dimensions. A resulting surgical planning system, i.e., three-dimensional virtual reality surgical planning and soft-tissue prediction for orthognathic surgery, consists of four major stages: computed tomography (CT) data post-processing and reconstruction, three-dimensional (3-D) color facial soft-tissue model generation, virtual surgical planning and simulation, soft-tissue-change preoperative prediction. The surgical planning and simulation are based on a 3D CT reconstructed bone model, whereas the soft-tissue prediction is based on color texture-mapped and individualized facial soft-tissue model. Our approach is able to provide a quantitative osteotomy-simulated bone model and prediction of postoperative appearance with photorealistic quality. The prediction appearance can be visualized from any arbitrary viewing point using a low-cost personal computer-based system. This cost-effective solution can be easily adopted in any hospital for daily use. View full abstract»

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  • ECG data compression using wavelets and higher order statistics methods

    Page(s): 108 - 115
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (139 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper evaluates the compression performance and characteristics of two wavelet coding compression schemes of electrocardiogram (ECG) signals suitable for real-time telemedical applications. The two proposed methods, namely the optimal zonal wavelet coding (OZWC) method and the wavelet transform higher order statistics-based coding (WHOSC) method, are used to assess the ECG compression issues. The WHOSC method employs higher order statistics (HOS) and uses multirate processing with the autoregressive HOS model technique to provide increasing robustness to the coding scheme. The OZWC algorithm used is based on the optimal wavelet-based zonal coding method developed for the class of discrete "Lipschitizian" signals. Both methodologies were evaluated using the normalized rms error (NRMSE) and the average compression ratio (CR) and bits per sample criteria, applied on abnormal clinical ECG data samples selected from the MIT-BIH database and the Creighton University Cardiac Center database. Simulation results illustrate that both methods can contribute to and enhance the medical data compression performance suitable for a hybrid mobile telemedical system that integrates these algorithmic approaches for real-time ECG data transmission scenarios with high CRs and low NRMSE ratios, especially in low bandwidth mobile systems. View full abstract»

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  • A knowledge-based boundary delineation system for contrast ventriculograms

    Page(s): 116 - 132
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (504 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Automated left-ventricle (LV) boundary delineation from contrast ventriculograms has been studied for decades. Unfortunately, no accurate methods have ever been reported. A new knowledge based multistage method to automatically delineate the LV boundary at end diastole (ED) and end systole (ES) is discussed in this paper. It has a mean absolute boundary error of about 2 mm and an associated ejection fraction error of about 6%. The method makes extensive use of knowledge about LV shape and movement. The processing includes a multi-image pixel region classification, shape regression, and rejection classification. The method was trained and cross-validated tested on a database of 375 studies whose ED and ES boundary had been manually traced as the ground truth. The cross-validated results presented in this paper show that the accuracy is close to and slightly above the interobserver variability. View full abstract»

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  • Blind separation of slow waves and spikes from gastrointestinal myoelectrical recordings

    Page(s): 133 - 137
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (104 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Myoelectrical recordings of the gut contain slow waves (slow rhythmicity) and spikes (fast rhythmicity). While the slow wave determines the frequency and propagation of gastrointestinal contractions, spike activities are directly associated with the contractions. Traditionally, spikes are extracted from the myoelectrical recording using high-pass/bandpass filters. Due to the sharp rising edge (high-frequency component) of the slow wave, the conventional method is not accurate in the separation of the slow wave and spikes, although it has been used for years. In this paper, a novel and fast blind source separation algorithm is developed. Experimental results show that the proposed method was able to accurately extract spike activities from the myoelectrical recordings obtained in dogs and that its performance was not affected by the high-frequency components of the slow wave. View full abstract»

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  • A neural classifier enabling high-throughput topological analysis of lymphocytes in tissue sections

    Page(s): 138 - 149
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (398 KB)  

    A neural cell detection system (NCDS) for the automatic quantitation of fluorescent lymphocytes in tissue sections is presented in this paper. The system acquires visual knowledge from a set of training cell-image patches selected by a user. The trained system evaluates an image in 2 min calculating: the number, the positions, and the phenotypes of the fluorescent cells. For validation, the NCDS learning performance was tested by cross validation on digitized images of tissue sections obtained from inherently different types of tissue: diagnostic tissue sections across the human tonsil and across an inflammatory lymphocyte infiltrate of the human skeletal muscle. The NCDS detection results were compared with detection results from biomedical experts and were visually evaluated by our most experienced biomedical expert. Although the micrographs were noisy and the fluorescent cells varied in shape and size, the NCDS detected a minimum of 95% of the cells. In contrast, the cellular counts based on visual cell recognition of the experts were inconsistent and largely unreproducible for approximately 80% of the lymphocytes present in a visual field. View full abstract»

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  • Magnetic resonance image analysis by information theoretic criteria and stochastic site models

    Page(s): 150 - 158
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (200 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Quantitative analysis of magnetic resonance (MR) images is a powerful tool for image-guided diagnosis, monitoring, and intervention. The major tasks involve tissue quantification and image segmentation where both the pixel and context images are considered. To extract clinically useful information from images that might be lacking in prior knowledge, the authors introduce an unsupervised tissue characterization algorithm that is both statistically principled and patient specific. The method uses adaptive standard finite normal mixture and inhomogeneous Markov random field models, whose parameters are estimated using expectation-maximization and relaxation labeling algorithms under information theoretic criteria. The authors demonstrate the successful applications of the approach with synthetic data sets and then with real MR brain images. View full abstract»

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  • CBIT - context-based image transmission

    Page(s): 159 - 170
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (545 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Few networks offer sufficient bandwidth for the transmission of high resolution two and three-dimensional medical image sets without incurring significant latency. Traditional compression methods achieve bit-rate reduction based on pixel statistics and ignore visual cues that are important in identifying visually informative regions. The paper describes an approach to managing image transmission in which spatial regions are selected and prioritized for transmission so that visually informative data is received in a timely manner. This context-based image transmission (CBIT) scheme is a lossless form of progressive image transmission (PIT) in which gross structure, represented by an approximate iconic image, is transmitted first. Each part of this iconic image is progressively updated, using a simple set of rules that take into account viewing requirements. CBIT is realized using knowledge about image composition to segment, label, prioritize, and fit geometric models to regions of an image. Tests, using neurological images, show that, with CBIT, a valuable transmitted image is received with a latency that is about one-tenth that of traditional PIT schemes. Frequently, the necessary regions of the image are transmitted in about half the time taken to transmit the full image. View full abstract»

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  • Adopting telemedicine services in the airline framework

    Page(s): 171 - 174
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (36 KB)  

    The paper gives a general overview of the telemedicine service on board airplanes, by considering the problems associated with it, the institutions that are already operating in the field, and the main projects (public and private) that are investigating in this direction. It also reports a brief discussion about the potential market and concludes with a number of issues related to such a service. Most of this information comes from the authors' active participation in several European projects that are particularly focused on telemedicine. View full abstract»

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  • Developing a regional healthcare information network

    Page(s): 177 - 180
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (28 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The Internet and associated technology is transforming the dissemination of healthcare information. As this occurs, means must be developed to manage and coordinate it effectively. One approach is through community healthcare information networks (CHINs), which benefit both information providers and consumers. The paper reports on a regional CHIN operational in Scotland. View full abstract»

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  • A three-year follow-up of Finnish telemedicine programs

    Page(s): 174 - 177
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (92 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The objective of the paper is to follow-up the success of Finnish telemedicine programs identified in 1996 in a nation-wide survey. The methods used are questionnaires sent to those in charge of a total of 40 telemedicine programs identified in 1996. Of the results of the programs responding to the survey (36 out of 40, i.e., 90%), 69% were still operative at the time of the follow-up in 1999. According to the respondents, one-third of the programs were deemed to have had an impact on the working process of the organization. The majority of the programs lacked a clear effect in this respect. In only four cases out of 36, the telemedicine program was deemed to have achieved savings, three of the programs had brought about extra costs, and four were cost neutral. However, in the majority of the cases, the respondents were not able to assess the financial impart of the program. The average duration of the programs still in progress was 4.2 years and those terminated was 2.5 years. The average number of patients treated in the programs still in progress was 370, i.e., approximately 88 patients per year. Of the telemedicine programs identified three years earlier, two-thirds were still in progress during the repeat survey. The average number of patients treated per year in these programs was relatively small, suggesting that telemedicine was not very successful in replacing traditional ways of delivering patient care. In line with this, only a minority of the programs were deemed to have had an effect on the working process of the organization, and cost savings were achieved in only a handful of cases View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine publishes basic and applied papers of information technology applications in health, healthcare and biomedicine.

 

This Transaction ceased publication in 2012. The current retitled publication is IEEE Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Yuan-ting Zhang
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University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong
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