By Topic

Control Systems, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date Jun 2001

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • A plant taxonomy for designing control experiments

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 7 - 14
    Cited by:  Papers (10)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (352 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Control experiments can have a significant impact on control theory by forcing researchers to confront real-world issues that affect design tradeoffs and performance specifications. Sensor and actuator constraints, modeling and identification issues, and hardware imperfections must all be addressed for successful controller implementation. Control experimentation, however, is not an established discipline, and there are many fundamental issues and questions that are worthy of deep and careful consideration. In particular, the definition of a control experiment is open, as are guidelines for verification and reproducibility. The author's objectives are limited to assessing plant features that are appropriate for investigating system-theoretic problems in feedback technology. This discussion of control experimentation venues is based on a plant taxonomy; that is, a systematic classification of plant properties and the challenges they present to control experimentation and, indirectly, to control engineering practice. The article is partially motivated by Hagan et al. (1996), which lists 16 candidate plants for undergraduate control experiments. Their selection criteria are: interesting, visual, instructive, and reasonably challenging. The author is especially interested in the features of these and other plants that render them worthwhile for experimentation for either education or research. The author's objective is to provide perspective on some of the issues that arise in designing control experiments for both education and research View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An open platform for reconfigurable control

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 49 - 64
    Cited by:  Papers (31)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1056 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Advances in software technology have the potential to revolutionize control system design. Component-based architectures encourage flexible "plug-and-play" extensibility and evolution of systems. Distributed object computing allows interoperation. Advances are being made to enable dynamic reconfiguration and evolution of systems while they are still running. Technologies are being developed to allow networked, embedded devices to connect to each other and self-organize. This article describes a software infrastructure that gives an open control platform (OCP) for complex systems that coordinates distributed interaction among diverse components and supports dynamic reconfiguration and customization of the components in real time. Its primary goals are to accommodate rapidly changing application requirements, incorporate new technology (such as hardware platforms or sensors), interoperate in heterogeneous environments, and maintain viability in unpredictable and changing environments. The next section describes the current practice in control system implementation and discusses features of a complex control system architecture. It is followed by a description of the desired features a software infrastructure must have to promote new advances in control system design. We then describe an open-control software infrastructure to support these desired features, followed by a brief overview of a first-generation prototype of this infrastructure that has been developed for an autonomous aerial vehicle control View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Hybrid intelligent control strategy. Supervising a DCS-controlled batch process

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 36 - 48
    Cited by:  Papers (19)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (964 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In industrial control, it frequently happens that, while the low-level controller performs very well, high-level supervision is required to maintain good overall performance that is usually beyond the capability of direct machine control. A hybrid control methodology combining conventional and intelligent techniques has been introduced to replace human supervision for a DCS-controlled laminar cooling process. The industrial experiments show the improved performance of the proposed hybrid control model and confirm its validity in a real manufacturing environment. The results can be extended to a wide range of processes with similar features. The methodology is superior in terms of high performance, reliability, simplicity and ease of construction View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Global sliding-mode control. Improved design for a brushless DC motor

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 27 - 35
    Cited by:  Papers (35)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (444 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    An improved global sliding-mode control (GSMC) was proposed for controlling second-order time-varying systems with bounded uncertain parameters and disturbances. The proposed controller drives the system states along the minimum time trajectory within the input torque limit. If the reference input and the bounds of the uncertain parameters and disturbances are specified, the minimum arrival time and the acceleration are expressed in closed-form equations. The proposed controller was applied to the brushless DC motor with uncertain loads. Experimental results of the proposed controller are quite similar to simulation and closed-form equation results and showed the best performance compared with other SMC. The closed-form equation can be used for designing motor-based actuators for mechanical systems without simulation and experiments View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Using a scale testbed: Controller design and evaluation

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 15 - 26
    Cited by:  Papers (20)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (11504 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    To circumvent the cost and inherent danger in testing aggressive vehicle controllers using full-sized vehicles, a scale vehicle testbed has been developed for use as an evaluation tool to bridge the design gap between simulation studies and full-sized hardware. We describe vehicle dynamic models of the IRS simulation system, along with experimental verification using frequency response and parameter measurements. The next section provides a detailed discussion of dynamic similitude via the Buckingham pi theorem (1914), as well as a graphical comparison between distributions of dynamic scale parameters of scaled and full-sized vehicles. Following that, a yaw rate vehicle controller is introduced to exemplify the type of investigations that can be conducted with the IRS. The controller uses differential torque and brake inputs to assist the driver to control the yaw rate of the vehicle and is designed to achieve model tracking while allowing the driver to maintain control over the front wheels of the vehicle View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Recollections of Norbert Wiener and the first IFAC world congress

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 65 - 70
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (332 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

IEEE Control Systems Magazine is the largest circulation technical periodical worldwide devoted to all aspects of control systems.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Jonathan P. How
jhow@mit.edu