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Software Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 5 • Date May 2001

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Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • Editorial

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 385 - 386
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • An efficient algorithm for aggregating PEPA models

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 449 - 464
    Cited by:  Papers (17)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (464 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Performance Evaluation Process Algebra (PEPA) is a formal language for performance modeling based on process algebra. It has previously been shown that, by using the process algebra apparatus, compact performance models can be derived which retain the essential behavioral characteristics of the modeled system. However, no efficient algorithm for this derivation was given. We present an efficient algorithm which recognizes and takes advantage of symmetries within the model and avoids unnecessary computation. The algorithm is illustrated by a multiprocessor example View full abstract»

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  • An internally replicated quasi-experimental comparison of checklist and perspective based reading of code documents

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 387 - 421
    Cited by:  Papers (22)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3464 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The basic premise of software inspections is that they detect and remove defects before they propagate to subsequent development phases where their detection and correction cost escalates. To exploit their full potential, software inspections must call for a close and strict examination of the inspected artifact. For this, reading techniques for defect detection may be helpful since these techniques tell inspection participants what to look for and, more importantly, how to scrutinize a software artifact in a systematic manner. Recent research efforts investigated the benefits of scenario-based reading techniques. A major finding has been that these techniques help inspection teams find more defects than existing state-of-the-practice approaches, such as, ad-hoc or checklist-based reading (CBR). We experimentally compare one scenario-based reading technique, namely, perspective-based reading (PBR), for defect detection in code documents with the more traditional CBR approach. The comparison was performed in a series of three studies, as a quasi experiment and two internal replications, with a total of 60 professional software developers at Bosch Telecom GmbH. Meta-analytic techniques were applied to analyze the data View full abstract»

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  • Reduction methods for real-time systems using Delay Time Petri Nets

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 422 - 448
    Cited by:  Papers (21)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (652 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present a new net-reduction methodology to facilitate the analysis of real-time systems using Delay Time Petri Nets (DTPNs). Net reduction is one of the most important techniques for reducing the state-explosion problem of Petri nets. However, the application of net reduction to current timed-extensions of Petri nets (such as Merlin's Time PNs) is very limited due to the difficulty faced in the preservation of timing constraints. To overcome this problem, we introduce DTPNs which are inspired by Merlin's (1976) Time PNs, Senac's (1994) Hierarchical Time Stream PNs, and Little's (1991) Timed PNs. We show that DTPNs are much more suitable for net reduction. Then, we present a new set of DTPN reduction rules for the analysis of schedule and deadlock analysis. Our work is distinct from the others since our goal is to analyze real-time systems and the reduction methods we propose preserve both timing properties (schedule) and deadlock. To evaluate our framework, we have implemented an automated analysis tool whose main functions include net reduction and class-graph generation. The experimental results show that our net-reduction methodology leads to a significant contribution to the efficient analysis of real-time systems View full abstract»

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  • An experiment measuring the effects of personal software process (PSP) training

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 465 - 472
    Cited by:  Papers (18)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (276 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The personal software process is a process improvement methodology aimed at individual software engineers. It claims to improve software quality (in particular defect content), effort estimation capability, and process adaptation and improvement capabilities. We have tested some of these claims in an experiment comparing the performance of participants who had just previously received a PSP course to a different group of participants who had received other technical training instead. Each participant of both groups performed the same task. We found the following positive effects: the PSP group estimated their productivity (though not their effort) more accurately, made fewer trivial mistakes, and their programs performed more careful error-checking; further, the performance variability was smaller in the PSP group in various respects. However, the improvements are smaller than the PSP proponents usually assume, possibly due to the low actual usage of PSP techniques in the PSP group. We conjecture that PSP training alone does not automatically realize the PSP's potential benefits (as seen in some industrial PSP success stories) when programmers are left alone with motivating themselves to actually use the PSP techniques View full abstract»

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  • Analysis of the effects of software reuse on customer satisfaction in an RPG environment

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 473 - 479
    Cited by:  Papers (10)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (960 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper reports on empirical research based on two software products. The research goal is to ascertain the impact of the adoption of a reuse policy on customer satisfaction. The results show that when a systematic reuse policy is implemented, such as the adoption of a domain specific library: reuse is significantly positively correlated with customer satisfaction; and there is a significant increase in customer satisfaction. The results have been extended to the underlying populations, supposed normal View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tseeicdwyer@computer.org