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Reliability, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 4 • Date Dec. 2000

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Displaying Results 1 - 10 of 10
  • Editorial Say What You Mean

    Page(s): 333
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Editorial In Statistical Control - What Does it Mean?

    Page(s): 334
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Commentary: reliability-past, present, and future

    Page(s): 335 - 341
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    The paper reviews the nature of reliability in relation to the causes of failures of engineering products, explains how most of the methods that have been developed and applied by reliability and quality specialists have been misleading and ineffective, and makes suggestions for the way ahead. View full abstract»

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  • Author index

    Page(s): 383 - 384
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Subject index

    Page(s): 384 - 388
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Prediction intervals for system lifetime, based on component test data

    Page(s): 351 - 354
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    This paper considers a monotonic system of statistically independent components whose lifetimes have a common exponential distribution. Prediction intervals are constructed for the lifetime of a monotonic system based on incomplete data. The results can be applied to related distributions View full abstract»

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  • Task-scheduling strategies for reliable TMR controllers using task grouping and assignment

    Page(s): 355 - 362
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    Real-time computers are often used in embedded, life-critical applications where high reliability is important. A common approach to make such systems dependable is to vote on redundant processors executing multiple copies of the same task. The most popular redundant structure is triple modular redundancy (TMR). The processors that make up such systems are subject not only to independently occurring permanent and transient faults, but to correlated transient faults, such as electromagnetic interference (EMI) caused by the operating environment. This paper proposes two new scheduling strategies for TMR computer-controllers. Both strategies can tolerate correlated faults as well as independent faults. These strategies, TMR-R (TMR with rotated task group) and TMR-Q (TMR with quintuple computation), are developed using task grouping and assignment. To evaluate the reliability of these strategies, a discrete-time Markov model for control systems is devised. Reliability equations for the TMR-R and TMR-Q are derived from state transitions of sampling intervals based on the Markov model. The reliability of these TMR is proved by comparing them with a conventional TMR, using numerical analysis. These proposed strategies are anticipated to be useful for control systems operating in harsh environments, such as controllers of airplanes or nuclear power plants View full abstract»

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  • A Gibbs-sampler approach to estimate the number of faults in a system using capture-recapture sampling [software reliability]

    Page(s): 342 - 350
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    A new recapture debugging model is suggested to estimate the number of faults in a system, ν, and the failure intensity of each fault, φ. The Gibbs sampler and the Metropolis algorithm are used in this inference procedure. A numerical illustration suggests a notable improvement on the estimation of ν and φ compared with that of a removal debugging model View full abstract»

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  • Lifetime-characteristics and inspection-schemes for Levy degradation processes

    Page(s): 377 - 382
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    Providing customers with efficient maintenance policies is of great interest to suppliers of complex industrial equipment and devices. Generally, developing such policies requires a great amount of data, and often these data are specific to each individual customer and each device “generation.” For a fairly general and useful class of degradation processes (Levy processes) this paper characterizes properties of device lifetime distributions, and shows how these properties can be used to modify maintenance policies for different customers or when a device is improved, e.g., through design changes View full abstract»

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  • Fault-tolerant system dependability-explicit modeling of hardware and software component-interactions

    Page(s): 363 - 376
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    This paper presents a framework for modeling the dependability of hardware and software fault-tolerant systems, taking into account explicitly the dependence among the components. These dependencies can result from: (a) functional or structural interactions between the components or (b) interactions due to global system reconfiguration and maintenance strategies. Modeling is based on GSPN (generalized stochastic Petri net). The modeling approach is modular: the behavior of each component and each interaction is represented by its own GSPN, while the system model is obtained by composition of these GSPN. Composition rules are defined and formalized through clear identification of the interfaces between the component and interaction nets. In addition to modularity, the formalism brings flexibility and re-usability, thereby allowing easy sensitivity analysis with respect to the assumptions that could be made about the behavior of the components and the resulting interactions. This approach has been successfully applied to select new architectures for the French Air Traffic Control system, based among other things, on availability evaluation. This paper illustrates it on a simple representative example, including all the types of the identified dependencies: the duplex system. Modeling of this system showed the strong dependence between components View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Transactions on Reliability is concerned with the problems involved in attaining reliability, maintaining it through the life of the system or device, and measuring it.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Way Kuo
City University of Hong Kong