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Computer

Issue 4 • Date Apr 2001

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Displaying Results 1 - 15 of 15
  • Virtual Organization: The new feudalism

    Page(s): 112 - 111
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  • New technologies place video in your hand

    Page(s): 14 - 17
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  • Speculative multithreaded processors

    Page(s): 66 - 73
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    Speculation will overcome the limitations in dividing a single program into multiple threads that can execute on the multiple logical processing elements needed to enhance performance through parallelization View full abstract»

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  • Power: a first-class architectural design constraint

    Page(s): 52 - 58
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    Power is a design constraint not only for portable computers and mobile communication devices but also for high-end systems, and the design process should not subordinate it to performance View full abstract»

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  • Foundries and the dawn of an open IP era

    Page(s): 43 - 46
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    Independent intellectual property (IP) providers began emerging in the late 1990s. The growing complexity of SOC (system-on-a-chip) technology dramatically increases design loading and creates the need for verified third-party cores to simplify multifunctional chip designs. Chip foundry companies play a key role in providing the IP hard cores and expediting design migration to smaller geometries in silicon-verified IP cores. As a result, foundries stand at the focal point of an impending open IP era that will facilitate the virtual re-integration of such value-adding activities as system design, IC design, third-party IP and electronic design automation (EDA). By serving as a virtual re-integrator, chip foundries will reverse the fragmentation of the IC industry and form the keystone in an efficient value-creation network View full abstract»

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  • Itsy: stretching the bounds of mobile computing

    Page(s): 28 - 36
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    The Compaq Itsy, a prototype pocket computer that has enough processing power and memory capacity to run cycle-hungry applications such as continuous-speech recognition and real-time MPEG-1 movie decoding, has proved to be a useful experimental tool for interesting applications, systems work and power studies View full abstract»

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  • Embedded computer architecture and automation

    Page(s): 75 - 81
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    The distinct requirements of embedded computing, coupled with emerging technologies, will stimulate system and processor specialization, customization and computer architecture automation View full abstract»

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  • Instruction-level distributed processing

    Page(s): 59 - 65
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    Shifts in hardware and software technology will soon force designers to look at microarchitectures that process instruction streams in a highly distributed fashion View full abstract»

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  • Early 21st Century processors

    Page(s): 47 - 50
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    The computer architecture arena faces exciting challenges as it attempts to meet the design goals and constraints that new markets, changing applications and fast-moving semiconductor technology impose View full abstract»

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  • Aspect-oriented programming takes aim at software complexity

    Page(s): 18 - 21
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    As global digitalization and the size of applications expand at an exponential rate, software engineering's complexities are also growing. One feature of this complexity is the repetition of functionality throughout an application. An example of the problems this complexity causes occurs when programmers must change an oft-repeated feature for an updated or new version of an application. It is often difficult for programmers to find every instance of such a feature in millions of lines of code. Failing to do so, however, can introduce bugs. To address this issue, software researchers are developing methodologies based on a new programming element: the aspect. An aspect is a piece of code that describes a recurring property of a program. Applications can, of course, have multiple aspects. Aspects provide cross-cutting modularity. In other words, programmers can use aspects to create software modules for issues that cut across various parts of an application. Aspects have the potential to make programmers' work easier, less time-consuming and less error-prone. Proponents say aspects could also lead to less expensive applications, shorter upgrade cycles and software that is flexible and more customizable. A number of companies and universities are working on aspects or aspect-like concepts View full abstract»

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  • Software architecture: introducing IEEE Standard 1471

    Page(s): 107 - 109
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    IEEE Standard 1471 identifies sound practices to establish a framework and vocabulary for software architecture concepts.In 2000, the Computer Society approved IEEE Standard 1471, which documents a consensus on good architectural description practices. Five core concepts and relationships provide the foundation for the approved IEEE 1471 version: every system has an architecture, but an architecture is not a system; an architecture and an architecture description are not the same thing; architecture standards, descriptions, and development processes can differ and be developed separately; architecture descriptions are inherently multiviewed; and separating the concept of an object's view from its specification is an effective way to write architecture description standards. IEEE 1471 focuses on both software intensive systems and more general systems, such as information systems, embedded systems, systems-of-systems, product lines, and product families in which software plays a substantial role in development, operation, or evolution View full abstract»

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  • Packet scheduling in next-generation multiterabit networks

    Page(s): 104 - 106
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    The infrastructure required to govern Internet traffic volume, which doubles every six months, consists of two complementary elements: fast point-to-point links and high-capacity switches and routers. Dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) technology, which permits transmission of several wavelengths over the same optical media, will enable optical point-to-point links to achieve an estimated 10 terabits per second by 2008. However, the rapid growth of Internet traffic coupled with the availability of fast optical links threatens to cause a bottleneck at the switches and routers View full abstract»

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  • The curse of fast iron [computer wargames]

    Page(s): 100 - 103
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    The wargaming public had never shown much demand for strategy games. Most wargamers prefer tactical-level games, where you plan for now and execute right away. Strategy games are complex-not necessarily more complex than tactical-level games, but requiring more strategic thought. You must plan ahead and make contingency plans as well. Strategy games' salvation arrived in the 1980s, when personal computers made it possible to automate many complex procedures and details. Players no longer needed a rare skill set to use a wargame. Suddenly, there were a lot more strategy games and a lot more people who could play them. Unfortunately, more powerful microprocessors, graphics chips and sound boards are killing commercial strategy games View full abstract»

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  • The cooler the better: new directions in the Nomadic Age

    Page(s): 38 - 42
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    Thanks to rapid progress in microelectronics technology, a new, nomadic lifestyle has become widespread these days. People, regardless of location, enjoy greater connectivity through communication networks and intelligent electronic terminals. This nomadic lifestyle will become even more common as technology frees people from the constraints of time and location. The cool chip, characterized by high performance and low power consumption, will play a key role in inaugurating the Nomadic Age. Rather than describe its technical details, we take a broader, more historic view of the cool chip's impact. More than a necessary innovation, cool chips' increased portability and reduced power consumption will play a key role in building a better future society View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes highly acclaimed peer-reviewed articles written for and by professionals representing the full spectrum of computing technology from hardware to software and from current research to new applications.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Ron Vetter
University of North Carolina
Wilmington