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Software, IEEE

Issue 2 • Date March-April 2001

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Displaying Results 1 - 12 of 12
  • Ireland: A software success story

    Page(s): 87 - 89
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  • Open source software adoption: a status report

    Page(s): 90 - 95
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    Using the right software is increasingly critical to project success, but the choices keep getting wider and more confusing. Open source software (OSS) has entered the mix, leaving the traditional confines of the hacker community and entering large-scale, well-publicized applications. However, although some argue that it is ready for wide-scale commercial adaptation and deployment, the myriad number of OSS packages make actual adoption a real challenge. This article presents a straightforward and practical roadmap to navigate your OSS adoption considerations. We do not have a universally accepted definition of OSS. For instance, Netscape, Sun Microsystems, and Apple recently introduced what they call "community-source" versions of their popular software-the Mozilla project, Solaris, and MacOS X, respectively. Such efforts, while validating the OSS concept, also make their inclusion into the OSS community a potential topic for contention. We use the loose definition of OSS that includes publicly available source code and community-source software. View full abstract»

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  • Separating user interface code

    Page(s): 96 - 97
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    The first program I wrote on a salary was scientific calculation software in Fortran. As I was writing, I noticed that the code running the primitive menu system differed in style from the code carrying out the calculations. So I separated the routines for these tasks, which paid off when I was asked to create higher-level tasks that did several of the individual menu steps. I could just write a routine that called the calculation routines directly without involving the menus. Thus, I learned for myself a design principle that's served me well in software development: Keep your user interface code separate from everything else. It's a simple rule, embodied into more than one application framework, but it's often not followed, which causes quite a bit of trouble. View full abstract»

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  • Synching or sinking: global software outsourcing relationships

    Page(s): 54 - 60
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    Global software outsourcing is the outsourcing of software development to subcontractors outside the client organization's home country, India is the leading GSO subcontractor, registering average annual growth of more than 40 percent over the last decade and developing nearly US$4 billion in software for foreign clients in FY 1999. Indian firms now develop software for nearly one-third of the Fortune 5002. The authors investigate the strategies that differentiate successful and unsuccessful value chain moves View full abstract»

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  • Globalization by chunking: a quantitative approach

    Page(s): 30 - 37
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    Because of economic, political, and practical needs, businesses regularly distribute their software production globally. Participants at the different development sites often suffer inhibited communication and coordination because they are remote from each other. One result of the affected communication and coordination might be reduced productivity and an increased production interval. We look for technical solutions to accommodate the business needs for distributed software development. In doing so, we investigate quantitative approaches to distributing work across geographic locations to minimize communication and synchronization needs View full abstract»

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  • Global software development

    Page(s): 16 - 20
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    The last several decades have witnessed a steady, irreversible trend toward the globalization of business, and of software-intensive high-technology businesses in particular. Economic forces are relentlessly turning national markets into global markets and spawning new forms of competition and cooperation that reach across national boundaries. This change is having a profound impact not only on marketing and distribution but also on the way produces are conceived, designed, constructed, tested, and delivered to customers. The author considers how software development is increasingly a multisite, multicultural, globally distributed undertaking View full abstract»

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  • Leveraging resources in global software development

    Page(s): 70 - 77
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    Leveraging global resources for software development is rapidly becoming the norm at Motorola, which has over 25 software development centers worldwide. Our project, called the 3G Trial (Third Generation Cellular System), was the first of its scope and significance developed by a global engineering team at Motorola. Staffing was the most significant issue we encountered in the 3G Trial. We had only about 20 percent of the required staff available at our division headquarters in Burlington Heights, Ill., US, and needed to find the other 80 percent to successfully complete the project. Early on, we concluded that our only means to staff the project was to rely on software development engineers from Motorola's worldwide software centers. We developed the system with staffing from six different countries. Next, we had to integrate the people into a team. While addressing this challenge, we identified key risk factors and developed approaches to reduce them. We separated the project risk factors into the five categories Carmel (1999) describes as the centrifugal forces that pull global projects apart. To pass on the lessons we learned from this project, this article sets out the global development issues we faced, our approaches to resolving them, and our findings compared to other research View full abstract»

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  • Tactical approaches for alleviating distance in global software development

    Page(s): 22 - 29
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    To overcome the problem of distance in global software development, various managers are experimenting and quickly adjusting their tactical approaches. We discuss some emerging approaches and explain their motivations from conceptual and practical perspectives. The most intuitive approach for alleviating distance is to apply communication technologies, but this is not our focus. Rather, we examine tactics that go beyond communication technologies, tactics aimed at reducing intensive collaboration, national and organizational cultural differences, and temporal distance View full abstract»

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  • Surviving global software development

    Page(s): 62 - 69
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    Software development involves teamwork and a lot of communication. It seems rational to put all your engineers in one place, encourage them to share objectives, and let the project run. Why use distributed sites when it's easier to work in one location without the overhead of remote communication and planning? How is it possible to survive (and succeed with) globally dispersed projects? Working in a global context has its advantages, but it also has drawbacks. On the plus side, you gain time-zone effectiveness and reduced cost in various countries. However, working on a globally distributed project means operating costs for planning and managing people, along with language and cultural barriers. It also creates jealousy as the more expensive engineers (who are afraid of losing their jobs) are forced to train their much cheaper counterparts. In this case study, we try to summarize experiences and share best practices from projects of different types and sizes that involve several locations on different continents and in many cultures View full abstract»

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  • Using components for rapid distributed software development

    Page(s): 38 - 45
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    Software development has not reached the maturity of other engineering disciplines; it is still challenging to produce software that works reliably, is easy to use and maintain, and arrives within budget and on time. In addition, relatively small software systems for highly specific applications are in increasing demand. This need requires a significantly different approach to software development from that used by their large, monolithic, general-purpose software counterparts such as Microsoft Word. The paper discusses the use of components for rapid distributed software development. It reports on the the experience of a large testbed called Educational Software Components of Tomorrow (www.escot.org), supported by the US National Science Foundation View full abstract»

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  • Outsourcing in India [software development]

    Page(s): 78 - 86
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    Starting in the early 1990s and motivated initially by the desire to cut personnel costs, many companies have explored multisite, multi-country software development approaches. India and Eastern Europe, in particular, have drawn attention. Most companies today distribute their development primarily to access human resources and competencies not available at home and only secondarily to cut labor costs. After examining various possible outsourcing models, this article reports on the experiences of Tenovis GmbH and Co. KG, a German company in the private (in-house) telecommunication domain, and its software development partner in Bangalore, India View full abstract»

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  • An experience in collaborative software engineering education

    Page(s): 47 - 53
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    Large-scale software development requires the interaction of specialists from different fields who must communicate their decisions and coordinate their activities. As global software development becomes mainstream, software engineers face new challenges for which they have received little or no training. To help a new generation of software developers better understand the industry's globalization and familiarize them with distributed, collaborative development, we designed a course entitled the Distributed Software Engineering Laboratory. In the class, pairs of students from different countries work as a virtual organization overseeing the whole software development process. We describe the lessons we have learned in this course and propose a framework useful in dealing with some of the difficulties participants face View full abstract»

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IEEE Software's mission is to build the community of leading and future software practitioners. The magazine delivers reliable, useful, leading-edge software development information to keep engineers and managers abreast of rapid technology change

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Editor-in-Chief
Forrest Shull
Fraunhofer Center for Experimental Software Engineering