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Education, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date Feb 2001

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Displaying Results 1 - 12 of 12
  • An Internet-assisted experimental environment suitable for the reinforcement of undergraduate teaching of advanced control techniques

    Page(s): 24 - 28
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (192 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The development of an experimental environment with interactive features, suitable both for the reinforcement of undergraduate level teaching of control theory and also for graduate-level research work in the field of intelligent control is described. The students are prepared for the experiment by an interactive session on the Internet before coming into the laboratory. The hardware and the software components of the experiment are integrated to achieve maximum effectiveness in teaching advanced control concepts, such as fuzzy and neuro-fuzzy control. The environment is also suitable for masters-level research work View full abstract»

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  • Robot-Draw, an Internet-based visualization tool for robotics education

    Page(s): 29 - 34
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (216 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Robot manipulators are described geometrically by their Denavit-Hartenberg parameters table. This article describes a package that combines recently developed Internet-based programming tools to generate three-dimensional virtual models of robot manipulators from a DH parameter table. Robot-Draw combines hypertext markup language (HTML), practical extraction and report language (PERL), and virtual reality modeling language (VRML). Internet users can generate three-dimensional robot manipulator models on their computer screens, navigate around the robot model and examine it from any angle. The package was designed as a visualization aid in robotics education and allows educators and students to easily visualize robotic structures and directly evaluate the effect of a parameter variation on the overall robot. Robot-Draw can also be a useful tool in the structural design of robot manipulators. Users with Internet connections can use the University of West Florida Robot-Draw package at the UWF Electrical Engineering web server by connecting to http://uwf.edu/ece/robotdraw.htm View full abstract»

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  • The Wien network: an introduction using a graphical calculator

    Page(s): 96 - 98
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (108 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In teaching a basic circuits course for technicians, a proposed geometrical construction, for which a justification is supplied, avoids the use of complex numbers in the sinusoidal signal analysis of the Wien network View full abstract»

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  • Curriculum development in microelectromechanical systems in mechanical engineering

    Page(s): 61 - 66
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (148 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Curriculum development in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) in the Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics (MEAM) Department at the University of Michigan is presented. A course curriculum structure that integrates both mechanical and electrical engineering courses is proposed for mechanical engineering students. The proposed curriculum starts from undergraduate study and finishes at the Ph.D. level. Two new graduate-level MEMS courses are proposed: “Introduction to MEMS” for senior undergraduate students and entry-level graduate students and “Advanced MEMS” for graduate students. The first course has been experimentally taught at the University of Michigan for three years and the class assessments are summarized and analyzed in this paper. It is clear from the student responses that they are interested in taking courses in emerging technologies such as MEMS and more courses in the MEMS area should be offered. Future MEMS curriculum development and a new MEMS course for undergraduate-level students in the college of engineering are discussed View full abstract»

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  • A competition-motivated capstone design course: the result of a fifteen-year evolution

    Page(s): 67 - 75
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (264 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, a design course organization is presented, which is the result of 15 years of experience with a two-semester senior design course sequence in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Detroit Mercy. An organization has been determined, which for the authors, balances team experience, individual assessment, design complexity, realism, writing content, and faculty workload. The current course structure is based on the integration of a capstone program with the Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC) sponsored by the Association For Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI). The competition rules require that the students design and build an autonomous land vehicle which can navigate while sensing lane lines, avoiding obstacles, and traveling over ramps and sand traps. There are two main competition events: the vehicle performance competition where the autonomous robotic vehicles compete to finish the course in the shortest time or by traveling the farthest in the allotted time, and the vehicle design competition that evaluates the documentation, design process, and presentation of each team. The authors have found that this type of competition matches both the spirit and the practical needs of their capstone design course View full abstract»

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  • A modern approach to teaching basic experimental electricity and electronics

    Page(s): 5 - 15
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (604 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes how basic electricity and electronic undergraduate laboratories for the electrical engineering course at Escola Politecnica, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil, have been revitalized with the introduction of modern automation procedures in the experiments. The approach has eased many experimental setups, eliminating some manual tedious data collection routines and allowing more time for efficient analysis of results, proposing new models for the assimilation of fundamental concepts, and offering modern resources for the elaboration of reports. The professional instruments and computational tools used in the labs have increased students' interest in the disciplines. Team work and creative learning are also objectives of the new methodology. Some examples on how the traditional experiments have been updated are described in this work. Implementation of this modern approach was accomplished involving the collaboration and suggestions of other professors, and specially, the work of several of our undergraduate students, who developed the automation and calculation routines View full abstract»

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  • Teaching computer systems performance analysis

    Page(s): 35 - 40
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (72 KB)  

    A course on computer systems performance analysis has been adapted for several different distance education delivery options, including an interactive television system, face-to-face presentation at a satellite campus, and delivery over the Internet to independent study students. Of the 122 students who have enrolled in this graduate-level course for a grade over the three-year period analyzed, half have been nontraditional students who never set foot on campus. These remote students have a substantially higher drop-out rate than the traditional on-campus students, and frequently indicate a strong preference for face-to-face instruction in a traditional classroom setting. Nevertheless, due to significant differences in the characteristics of the two student groups, the remote students typically earn higher final course grades than the on-campus students. While there is a strong demand for delivery of this type of advanced course to remote students, more still needs to be done to effectively engage these students in the learning process View full abstract»

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  • Compact disc players in the laboratory: experiments in optical storage, error correction, and optical fiber communication

    Page(s): 47 - 60
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (264 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The compact disc player is a synergy of optics, communication theory, digital signal processing, and control engineering. This familiar consumer product may be employed as a cost-effective laboratory instrument to teach the fundamentals of optical storage, error detection and correction, and optical communication. The compact disc audio system, from analog input, through optical storage and distribution, to audio reproduction, provides an excellent model of a complete real-world optical transmission and storage system. A series of experiments, which illustrate some of the more significant operational principles of the compact disc player, are presented in this contribution. Optical read-out and the physics of information density are explored through a set of experiments in optical storage. Error detection and correction are studied experimentally by evaluating the performance of the compact disc player's error control system. The design of an optical fiber communication system is studied by extracting the channel bit stream from a compact disc player, transmitting it over an optical fiber link, and then reinserting it back into the compact disc player for audio reproduction View full abstract»

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  • An interactive multimedia system on “computer architecture, organization, and design”

    Page(s): 41 - 46
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (312 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The multimedia system described in this paper demonstrates the successful integration of multimedia into education and provides a clear example of how multimedia can be used to deliver computer engineering and computer science concepts to the often diverse student base. The paper describes an interactive, knowledge-based multimedia system that has been used to teach users about the basic aspects of computer architecture, organization, and design. The system is well suited for self-paced, student directed study, student review, and classroom presentation and discussion. The system allows learners to choose how information will be displayed, changing for example, among text, graphics, animation, and simulation. The hypermedia capabilities built into the system enables it to respond based on the dynamic evaluation of both the contexts of the human-computer collaboration and the knowledge base underlying the visible screen presentation. The system serves as a very useful aid to introduce and demonstrate some of the fundamental ideas of computer architecture and organization View full abstract»

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  • Optoelectronics experiments for first-year engineering students

    Page(s): 16 - 23
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (92 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes a set of experiments in optoelectronics for first-year engineering students. This laboratory experience is comprised of five inexpensive and transportable modules that provide a hands-on introduction to optoelectronics, these modules include different types of emitters, light-emitting diode (LED) colors, optical voice link, total internal reflection and waveguiding. Designed by a senior electrical engineering student, these modules appeal to students with various learning styles. Two hundred eight-five first-year engineering students at Bucknell University and the University of San Diego (USA) have performed these experiments. Student response to the laboratories has been enthusiastic with 80% of the students rating the lab as very good or excellent overall. Further assessment of the experiments by the instructor and the students is also discussed View full abstract»

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  • Development of a web-based laboratory for control experiments on a coupled tank apparatus

    Page(s): 76 - 86
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1040 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The Internet provides a new environment for developing a variety of applications for educational and research purposes. This paper presents the implementation of a web-based laboratory experiment on a coupled tank apparatus, a multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) system. The web-based laboratory has been developed to serve students and staff in the Department of Electrical Engineering at the National University of Singapore (NUS). The laboratory is an educational tool for teaching students the basic principles and methodology in performing a series of experiments on a coupled tank apparatus at any time and from any location through the Internet. With the capability to implement strategies for manual, proportional integral derivative (PID), general state-space, and fuzzy logic control, the laboratory also provides a platform for research staff to test control algorithms. Video conferencing has been used to provide audio and video feedback, with a camera mounted on a movable platform so that the user can control both the zooming and viewing angle View full abstract»

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  • Interactive object-oriented simulation of interconnected power systems using SIMULINK

    Page(s): 87 - 94
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (132 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    An object-oriented power system simulation environment is constructed using the SIMULINK dynamic system modeling software. The environment is well suited to educational purposes, because the user interface is interactive and intuitive with a graphical, object-oriented model representation. For small system studies, a model is constructed in block diagram form with one block for each system component. For large scale simulations, the dynamics of portions of the network can be combined into collective blocks, with parameters managed as data arrays accessed indirectly using string mnemonics. The advanced numerical capabilities built into SIMULINK provide an excellent simulation engine for the nonlinear models. Offline analysis is available through the extensive capabilities of the MATLAB environment View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

Educational research, methods, materials, programs, and technology in electrical engineering, computer engineering, and fields within the scope of interest of IEEE.

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Jeffrey E. Froyd
Texas A&M University