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Communications Magazine, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date March 2001

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Displaying Results 1 - 14 of 14
  • Advertisers' Index

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 220 - 221
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Methods of upstream power backoff on very high speed digital subscriber lines

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 210 - 216
    Cited by:  Papers (18)  |  Patents (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (84 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article describes the near-far problem in the upstream direction of VDSL, which results when the lengths of VDSL loops in a binder vary significantly. Methods of upstream power backoff to mitigate the near-far problem are then described. Simulation results are presented, and the performances of the methods are discussed View full abstract»

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  • Interactive Web service via satellite to the home

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 182 - 190
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (100 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The satellite distribution of digital broadcast signals to the home has become widespread in the last seven years, delivering hundreds of television channels. We we have also seen other services appear, such as Direct PCTM where data is broadcast. This service may be used to deliver information like stock quotes to a large number of users, or information such as Web pages may be requested by a single user. In the latter case, however, a return path is needed from the end user to the service provider in order to provide the specific information requested by the user. In services offered today this information is usually provided by a terrestrial return link, most often a telephone line. While a telephone line with a modem is adequate in most cases, it has the drawback of tying up an existing telephone line for a considerable amount of time for very little data transmission, or requiring an additional line. Furthermore, in many parts of the world a telephone line may not be readily available. In these cases a satellite return link may be a viable option using VSATs. We describe an investigation and simulation of a return path VSAT link designed specifically for delivery of Web traffic requests to a base station and thence via a terrestrial link, using the Internet, to a Web server. The focus in this work is on the MAC protocol to support such a satellite channel and on modeling the whole service from traffic generation through transport, network, and MAC layers to the physical channel View full abstract»

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  • All-optical packet switching for metropolitan area networks: opportunities and challenges

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 142 - 148
    Cited by:  Papers (65)  |  Patents (15)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (108 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The fast evolution of networks has been continuously driven by new advances in enabling technologies, as well as the growth of Internet traffic. All-optical packet switching provides high throughput, rich routing functionalities, and excellent flexibility. These characteristics make it an excellent candidate for next-generation metropolitan area networks, which will be much more dynamic and demanding than today's networks. In this article we not only discuss some of the architectural challenges involved in the design of all-optical packet switched networks, but also present the reader a high-level picture of how such future networks could be integrated with other network segments, to provide users end-to-end connectivity with performance and simplicity View full abstract»

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  • Architectures and protocols that enable new applications on optical networks

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 118 - 127
    Cited by:  Papers (20)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (104 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article first discusses how advances in networking architectures and protocols can complement advances in optical communications research to increase the overall value of optical networks by enabling more applications. A review of existing optical networking solutions is then provided along with a classification of different types of optical networks. Finally, we show how single-hop and multihop wavelength-routed networks can be used efficiently for fast end-to-end file transfers when these networks are equipped with a hardware-implementable signaling protocol, a routing protocol, and a simple transport protocol View full abstract»

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  • Multiprotocol lambda switching: combining MPLS traffic engineering control with optical crossconnects

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 111 - 116
    Cited by:  Papers (61)  |  Patents (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (72 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article describes an approach to the design of control planes for optical crossconnects which leverages existing control plane techniques developed for MPLS traffic engineering. The proposed approach combines recent advances in MPLS traffic engineering control plane constructs with OXC technology to provide a framework for real-time provisioning of optical channels, foster development and deployment of a new class of OXCs, and allow the use of uniform semantics for network management and operations control in hybrid networks consisting of OXCs and label switching routers. The proposed approach is particularly advantageous for OXCs intended for data-centric optical internetworking systems View full abstract»

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  • The application of optical packet switching in future communication networks

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 128 - 135
    Cited by:  Papers (155)  |  Patents (19)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (96 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Telecommunication networks are experiencing a dramatic increase in demand for capacity, much of it related to the exponential takeup of the Internet and associated services. To support this demand economically, transport networks are evolving to provide a reconfigurable optical layer which, with optical cross-connects, will realize a high-bandwidth flexible core. As well as providing large capacity, this new layer will be required to support new services such as rapid provisioning of an end-to-end connection under customer control. The first phase of network evolution, therefore, will provide a circuit-switched optical layer characterized by high capacity and fast circuit provisioning. In the longer term, it is currently envisaged that the bandwidth efficiency associated with optical packet switching (a transport technology that matches the bursty nature of multimedia traffic) will be required to ensure economic use of network resources. This article considers possible network application scenarios for optical packet switching. In particular, it focuses on the concept of an optical packet router as an edge network device, functioning as an interface between the electronic and optical domains. In this application it can provide a scalable and efficient IP traffic aggregator that may provide greater flexibility and efficiency than an electronic terabit router with reduced cost. The discussion considers the main technical issues relating to the concept and its implementation View full abstract»

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  • DOCSISTM cable modem technology

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 202 - 209
    Cited by:  Papers (14)  |  Patents (32)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (88 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    An overview of the cable modem interface standard is presented. This standard is the foundation for high-speed access to content on the Internet being offend by North American cable operators. It also facilitates retail sales of modems and integration into computers, is being adopted by international operators, and provides a path for convergence of video, data, and voice services on a broadband cable system. The details of the protocol stack and evolution of the standard are discussed View full abstract»

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  • The perspective of optical packet switching in IP dominant backbone and metropolitan networks

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 136 - 141
    Cited by:  Papers (29)
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    This article analyses the rationale and technical solutions for the use of optical packet switching techniques for both backbone and metropolitan applications. It also provides information on state-of-the-art technologies available for medium-term product development View full abstract»

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  • Effects on TCP of routing strategies in satellite constellations

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 172 - 181
    Cited by:  Papers (8)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (192 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A broadband satellite network uses a constellation of a number of similar satellites to provide wireless networking services to the Earth. A number of these constellation networks are under development. This article introduces the types of satellite constellation networks, and examines how overall performance of TCP communications carried across such a network can be affected by the choice of routing strategies used within the network. Constellations utilizing direct intersatellite links are capable of using multiple paths between satellites simultaneously as a strategy to spread network load. This allows more general routing strategies than shortest-path routing, but we show these strategies to be detrimental to the performance of individual TCP connections View full abstract»

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  • Interactive channel for multimedia satellite networks

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 192 - 198
    Cited by:  Papers (25)  |  Patents (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (96 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Multimedia, including Internet traffic, can currently be multiplexed within the DVB/MPEG-2 formats and delivered direct to home users. Traditionally a slow terrestrial telephone link between the user and Internet service provider is used to request data. A direct return channel system will facilitate users' high-bit-rate bidirectional communication via satellite. The return link could be used for the fast Internet access or large data exchanges that will be necessary in a multimedia world. The satellite system not only removes the need for wires but also increases transfer speeds. Satellite interactive terminals can establish network connections via satellite and a ground-based hub. The DVB/MPEG-2 format carries up to 45 Mb/s in the forward link, and a multifrequency time-division multiple access scheme allows up to 2 Mbit/s in the return direction. The return channel of the interactive channel for multimedia satellite networks underwent final standardization by ETSI in early 2000. This article reviews the system concept of a typical implementation. The key features of the return channel air interface, from transmission parameter to login procedure, are explained. In general, Internet packets are expected to be carried via DVB/MPEG-2 in the forward direction and via ATM in the return direction. The IP transportation techniques are described View full abstract»

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  • Satellite-based Internet: a tutorial

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 154 - 162
    Cited by:  Papers (42)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (112 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In a satellite-based Internet system, satellites are used to interconnect heterogeneous network segments and to provide ubiquitous direct Internet access to homes and businesses. This article presents satellite-based Internet architectures and discusses multiple access control, routing, satellite transport, and integrating satellite networks into the global Internet View full abstract»

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  • Voice over IP service and performance in satellite networks

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 164 - 171
    Cited by:  Papers (13)
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    Voice over IP services have emerged as a low-cost alternative to PSTN voice service, and an attractive solution for voice/data integration in public and private networks. Satellite systems, as an integral part of the global communications infrastructure, already have an increasing portion of their capacities used to carry data packets, and with their global coverage and reach to remote areas are well positioned to enable growth of VoIP services. For VoIP over satellite, several issues need to be addressed. These include transmission and quality of service issues, as well as service-related issues such as service creation and customization, support of IN and supplementary services, and seamless integration with the PSTN. While the service-related aspects of VoIP are common to both terrestrial and satellite networks, transport-related issues are different. This article reports performance results of laboratory experiments for evaluating VoIP over satellite under different link and traffic conditions View full abstract»

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  • Optical switching networks: from circuits to packets

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 107 - 108
    Cited by:  Papers (10)
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Communications Magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications systems (PCS), ISDN, and more.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Osman Gebizlioglu
Huawei Technologies