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Information Technology in Biomedicine, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date March 2001

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Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
  • Telemedicine system using computed tomography van of high-speed telecommunication vehicle

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 2 - 9
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (202 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The current medical system provides medical services to patients who visit hospitals. However, medical services can be provided at or close to the home of the patient using fully-equipped mobile telemedicine systems. Such a system can identify diseases at an early stage, improve the patient's quality of life and prognosis through early diagnosis and treatment, and reduce the cost of the medical service. Furthermore, the unit can provide mass screenings of the population, as well as a full medical service to remote areas. The Telecommunications Advanced Organization of Japan and Shinshu University Hospital established a research center for a unique telemedicine project using a mobile system. The mobile unit consists of a van that houses a spiral computed tomography (CT) machine and various telecommunications equipment. The unit allows medical examinations, CT scanning, and online two-way transfer of image data/teleconferencing to a medical center for consultation with various specialists. We have used the system thus far for the early detection of lung cancer through mass screenings over a four-year period in 29 administrative districts. Mass screenings of 19,117 residents resulted in the identification of 75 cases of early lung cancer in patients who were later treated by partial pneumonectomy. We have also used the system to provide medical services and telemedicine support to remote areas, winter-time telemedicine support to an international sports competition, and various medical services to a home-care facility. View full abstract»

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  • Agents acting and moving in healthcare scenario - a paradigm for telemedical collaboration

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 10 - 13
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (42 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes a novel approach to the analysis and development of telemedicine systems, based on the multi-agent paradigm. An agent is an autonomous, social, reactive and proactive entity, and is sometimes also mobile. Since telemedicine is grounded on communication and the sharing of resources, agents are suitable for telemedicine systems analysis and implementation, and we adopted them for developing a prototype telemedical agent. View full abstract»

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  • Design of a telemedicine system using a mobile telephone

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 13 - 15
    Cited by:  Papers (55)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (45 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes the design of a prototype integrated mobile telemedicine system that is compatible with existing mobile telecommunications networks and upgradable for use with third-generation networks. The system, when fully developed, will enable a doctor to monitor remotely a patient who is free to move around for sports medicine and for emergency situations. View full abstract»

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  • A telematic system for oncology based on electronic health and patient records

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 16 - 17
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (42 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The NHS in the UK recognizes six levels of IT adoption in healthcare systems. Most current healthcare systems are at Level 1 (clinical administrative data), with some notable specialized exceptions. The telematic system for oncology is at Level 6 (advanced multimedia and telematics). Oncology is a particularly complicated area, as it draws on most of the other diagnostic systems and also has a number of different treatment regimes, each of which may have their own system. Relevant information is extracted from the underlying systems on a regular basis and stored on a server that can be accessed by various parties. Regarding the electronic health record (EHR), a centralized national directory would need to be in place to show the locations of individual electronic patient records (EPRs). In order to clearly capture and specify the requirements of the telematic system for oncology, it was decided that a framework based on Ariadne, especially designed for describing computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) should be used. The use of such a framework captures the workflow, clearly showing the tasks of each actor within the processes, as well as the resources needed by each actor. The Ariadne framework was developed as part of a European ESPRIT research project (No. 6225) which studied computational notations for representing CSCW. Ariadne can be considered as a notation for defining a multi-agent architecture for supporting articulation work among cooperating actors. View full abstract»

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  • A 3-D marker-free system for the analysis of movement disabilities - an application to the legs

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 18 - 26
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (165 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Describes an approach allowing the analysis of human motion in 3D space. The system that we developed is composed of three CCD (charge-coupled device) cameras that capture synchronized image sequences of a human body in motion without the use of markers. Characteristic points belonging to the boundaries of the body in motion are first extracted from the initial images. 2D superquadrics are then adjusted on these points by a fuzzy clustering process. After that, the position of a 3D model based on a set of articulated superquadrics, each of them describing a part of the human body, is reconstructed. An optical flow process allows the prediction of the position of the model from its position at a previous time, and gives initial values for the fuzzy classification. The results that we present more specifically concern the analysis of movement disabilities of a human leg during gait. They are improved by using articulation-based constraints. The methodology can be used in human motion analysis for clinical applications. View full abstract»

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  • Abstracting human control strategy in projecting light source

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 27 - 32
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (85 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we present a method for modeling human strategies in controlling a light source in a dynamic environment. In order to illustrate the procedure and method, we take a simple example of how to control a light source so as to avoid a shadow and to maintain appropriate illumination conditions on the target area of attention. This work is likely to be valuable in various applications of automatic light control-from surgical rooms and space applications to inspections. View full abstract»

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  • A knowledge-based system for patient image pre-fetching in heterogeneous database environments - modeling, design, and evaluation

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 33 - 45
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (182 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A radiologist often needs to reference relevant prior images of the same patient for confirmation or comparison purposes. To effectively support such needs, we developed a knowledge-based patient image pre-fetching system, addressing several challenging requirements that included representation and learning of image reference heuristics and management of data-intensive knowledge inferencing. The system demands an extensible and maintainable architecture design that is capable of effectively adapting to a dynamic environment characterized by heterogeneous and autonomous data-source systems. We developed a synthesized object-oriented entity-relationship model that is appropriate for representing radiologists' prior image reference heuristics. We detail the system architecture and design of the image pre-fetching system. Our design is based on a client-mediator-server framework that is capable of coping with a dynamic environment. To adapt to changes in prior image reference heuristics, ID3-based multi-decision-tree induction and CN2-based multi-decision induction learning techniques were developed and evaluated. We examined effects of the pre-fetching system on radiologists' examination readings. Preliminary results show that the knowledge-based patient image pre-fetching system more accurately supports patient prior image reference needs than the current practice adopted at the study site and that radiologists may become more efficient, consultatively effective and better satisfied when supported by the pre-fetching system than when relying on the study site's existing pre-fetching practice. View full abstract»

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  • A computer-aided diagnosis system for digital mammograms based on fuzzy-neural and feature extraction techniques

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 46 - 54
    Cited by:  Papers (48)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (136 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    An intelligent computer-aided diagnosis system can be very helpful for radiologist in detecting and diagnosing microcalcification patterns earlier and faster than typical screening programs. In this paper, we present a system based on fuzzy-neural and feature extraction techniques for detecting and diagnosing microcalcifications' patterns in digital mammograms. We have investigated and analyzed a number of feature extraction techniques and found that a combination of three features (such as entropy, standard deviation and number of pixels) is the best combination to distinguish a benign microcalcification pattern from one that is malignant. A fuzzy technique in conjunction with three features was used to detect a microcalcification pattern and a neural network was used to classify it into benign/malignant. The system was developed on a Microsoft Windows platform. It is an easy-to-use intelligent system that gives the user options to diagnose, detect, enlarge, zoom and measure distances of areas in digital mammograms. View full abstract»

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  • A new concept toward computer-aided medical diagnosis - a prototype implementation addressing pulmonary diseases

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 55 - 65
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (628 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The original concept that led to the structuring of a computer-based medical decision support system (DSS) that is able to support a physician's diagnosis is introduced in this paper. The concept's implementation modeled a generic DSS, the core of which are an integrated knowledge/information base (KIB) along with the inference properties of a data evaluator. The KIB encapsulates the necessary medical knowledge and experience in the form of rules and constraints, preemptive tasks and actual patients' clinical data. The data evaluator handles approved medical subjective and objective criteria for assessing the KIB's data. The data evaluator incorporates a medical standard data gathering and decision process, structured upon the principles of the clinical differential diagnosis methodology, and has been integrated in the system by means of both algorithmic and artificial intelligence techniques. The novel model and the resulted computer-based package have been extensively tested at the Pulmonary Department of the University Regional Hospital Patras, Greece. View full abstract»

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  • Simultaneous estimation of physiological parameters and the input function - in vivo PET data

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 67 - 76
    Cited by:  Papers (31)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (268 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Dynamic imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) is widely used for the in-vivo measurement of the regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRGlc) with [ 18F]fluorodeoxy-D-glucose (FDG), and is used for the clinical evaluation of neurological diseases. However, in addition to the acquisition of dynamic images, continuous arterial blood sampling is the conventional method of obtaining the tracer time-activity curve in blood (or plasma) for the numerical estimation of rCMRGlc in mg glucose/100 g tissue/min. The insertion of arterial lines and the subsequent collection and processing of multiple blood samples are impractical for clinical PET studies because it is invasive, it has the remote (but real) potential for producing limb ischemia, and it exposes personnel to additional radiation and the risks associated with handling blood. Based on a method for extracting kinetic parameters from dynamic PET images, we developed a modified version (post-estimation method) to improve the numerical identifiability of the parameter estimates when we deal with data obtained from clinical studies. We applied both methods to dynamic neurological FDG PET studies in three adults. We found that the input function and parameter estimates obtained with our noninvasive methods agreed well with those estimated from the gold-standard method of arterial blood sampling and that rCMRGlc estimates were highly correlated. No significant difference was found between rCMRGlc estimated by our methods and the gold-standard method. We suggest that our proposed noninvasive methods may offer an advance over existing methods. View full abstract»

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  • Optimal scheduling of tracing computations for real-time vascular landmark extraction from retinal fundus images

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 77 - 91
    Cited by:  Papers (30)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (395 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This group published fast algorithms for automatic tracing (vectorization) of the vasculature in live retinal angiograms, and for the extraction of visual landmarks formed by vascular bifurcations and crossings. These landmarks are used for feature-based image matching for controlling a computer-assisted laser retinal surgery instrument under development. This paper describes methods to schedule the vascular tracing computations to maximize the rate of growth of quality of the partial tracing results within a frame cycle. There are two main advantages. First, progressive image matching from partially extracted landmark sets can be faster, and provide an earlier indication of matching failure. Second, the likelihood of successful image matching is greatly improved since the extracted landmarks are of the highest quality for the given computational budget. The scheduling method is based on quantitative measures for the computational work and the quality of landmarks. A coarse grid-based analysis of the image is used to generate seed points for the tracing computations, along with estimates of local edge strengths, orientations, and vessel thickness. These estimates are used to define criteria for real-time preemptive scheduling of the tracing computations. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine publishes basic and applied papers of information technology applications in health, healthcare and biomedicine.

 

This Transaction ceased publication in 2012. The current retitled publication is IEEE Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Yuan-ting Zhang
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University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong
ytzhang@ee.cuhk.edu.hk
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Fax:+852 2609-5558