By Topic

Industrial Electronics, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date Feb. 2001

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 27
  • Guest editorial special section on computationally intelligent methodologies and sliding-mode control

    Page(s): 2 - 3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (16 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Evaluation of soft switching for EV and HEV motor drives

    Page(s): 82 - 90
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (130 KB)  

    Soft switching has the potential of reducing switch stresses and of lowering the switching losses as compared to hard switching. To understand the effectiveness of the soft-switching technique, when applied to electric vehicle (EV) and hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) systems, it may be necessary to first evaluate their system requirements and performance. This evaluation process would require knowledge of the vehicle dynamics. The vehicle load requires a special torque-speed profile from the drivetrain for minimum power ratings to meet the vehicle's operational constraints, such as initial acceleration and gradability. The selection of motor and its control for EV and HEV applications are dictated mainly by this special torque-speed requirement. As a consequence, this requirement will have a strong influence on the converter operation. This paper makes an attempt to evaluate EV and HEV running in both standard Federal Test Procedure 1975 city driving and highway driving cycles. A simplified analysis is carried out for several of the most commonly used electric motors operating on the optimal torque-speed profile. Special attention is given to the converter conduction and switching losses, by analyzing the switching losses, and by assuming that an ideal soft-switching scheme will have zero switching losses, one can evaluate the improvement in the system efficiency if a soft-switching control is used. The relative significance of soft switching for EV and HEV systems is then established. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Adaptive quasi-sliding-mode tracking control for discrete uncertain input-output systems

    Page(s): 216 - 224
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (208 KB)  

    In this paper, a discrete robust adaptive quasi-sliding-mode tracking controller is presented for input-output systems with unknown parameters, unmodeled dynamics, and bounded disturbances. The robust tracking controller is comprised of adaptive control and a sliding-mode-based control design. The bounded motion of the system around the sliding surface and the stability of the global system in the sense that all signals remain bounded are guaranteed. The adaptive algorithm, in which the deadzone method is employed even though the upper and lower bounds of the disturbances are unknown, is the extension of the authors' previous work for the state-space systems. An example and its simulation results are presented to illustrate the proposed approach View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Analysis and modeling of peak-current-mode-controlled buck converter in DICM

    Page(s): 127 - 135
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (244 KB)  

    This paper presents a unified method to obtain both small- and large-signal models for a peak-current-mode-controlled buck converter which accurately predict its behavior. The models show that the peak-current-mode transfer functions are effectively of first order, as can be expected due to the heavy bounding of inductor current. The large-signal behavior can be accurately predicted by using a simple algebraic equation including the mode limit of basic-switching-frequency operation as well as the input-output relations. It is also pointed out that a buck converter can have stable open-loop as well as closed-loop operation modes at basic switching frequency and at its even and odd harmonics. The subharmonic modes are, however, not controllable in a conventional way View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An efficient technique for modeling and synthesis of automotive engine sounds

    Page(s): 225 - 234
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (244 KB)  

    This paper presents a new method for modeling and synthesis of automotive engine sounds using a deterministic-stochastic signal decomposition approach. First, the deterministic component is extracted using a synchronous discrete Fourier transform method and this is subtracted out from the original signal. Next, the (residual) stochastic component is modeled (and synthesized) using a new multipulse excited time-series modeling technique. The effectiveness of the proposed methodology is demonstrated using recorded data sets of actual engine sounds. The results of both numerical and subjective assessment tests are presented View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Sensorless induction motor drive with a single DC-link current sensor and instantaneous active and reactive power feedback

    Page(s): 195 - 204
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (228 KB)  

    This paper proposes a novel torque and speed control structure for low-cost induction motor variable-speed drives with a single DC-link current sensor. The controller is based on reconstruction of the active and instantaneous reactive power from the DC-link current without the use of a shaft sensor. An effective way of achieving tracking of set values of motor torque and flux is to base the estimation on the instantaneous active (P) and reactive power (Q). The paper proposes a way for extracting instantaneous P and Q information from the DC-link current and the pulsewidth modulation pattern. Torque and flux controllers suitable for general purpose and traction applications are proposed. The paper presents analytical considerations, straightforward design guidelines, and experimental results obtained from a traction system with a battery-fed three-phase inverter and a 7.5 kW traction motor View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A fuzzy sliding controller for nonlinear systems

    Page(s): 32 - 37
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (140 KB)  

    It is well known that sliding-mode control can give good transient performance and system robustness. However, the presence of chattering may introduce problems to the actuators. Many chattering elimination methods use a finite DC gain controller which leads to a finite steady-state error. One method to ensure zero steady-state error is using a proportional plus integral (PI) controller. This paper proposes a fuzzy logic controller which combines a sliding-mode controller (SMC) and a PI controller. The advantages of the SMC and the PI controller can be combined and their disadvantages can be removed. The system stability is proved, although there is one more state variable to be considered in the PI subsystem. An illustrative example shows that good transient and steady-state responses can be obtained by applying the proposed controller View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Modeling of distortion compensation ineffectivity in filters for nonactive power

    Page(s): 91 - 100
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (180 KB)  

    This paper evaluates the error in compensation due to two main limitations. The first limitation is the lagging of the compensation reference caused by the sampling and processing due to digital signal processing equipment. The second limitation is the di/dt capability of the switching converter. Models are derived to evaluate the error due to these two limitations, as well as the percentage contribution to the total ineffectivity of compensation. Experimental results confirm that the mentioned limitation that has the most detrimental effect on compensation can easily be determined with the use of the models derived in this paper View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Friction modeling and adaptive compensation using a relay feedback approach

    Page(s): 169 - 176
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (192 KB)  

    In this paper, the application of a dual-relay feedback approach toward modeling of frictional effects in servomechanisms is addressed. The friction model consists of Coulomb and viscous friction components, both of which can be automatically extracted from suitably designed relay experiments. At the same time, the dynamical model of the servomechanical system can be obtained from the experiments. Thus, a proportional-integral-derivative feedback motion controller and a feedforward friction compensator can be automatically tuned in this manner. The friction model obtained is also directly applicable to initialization of an adaptive control scheme proposed. Results from simulation and experiments are presented to illustrate the practical appeal of the proposed method View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A novel pulsewidth control scheme for fixed-frequency zero-voltage-switching DC-to-DC PWM bridge converter

    Page(s): 101 - 110
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (280 KB)  

    A new gating pulse scheme is proposed for the control of DC-to-DC pulsewidth-modulated (PWM) bridge converter that provides zero-voltage switching (ZVS) for all the switches for a wide variation in load and input voltage. This new complementary fixed-edge gating control scheme is compared to the traditional phase shift control scheme. Modes of operation are presented and analyzed. Based on the analysis, design procedure and design curves are obtained. An optimum design is given and a design example is presented. Results obtained from PSPICE simulation for the converter designed are given to verify the performance of the proposed converter for varying load as well as line voltage. Detailed results obtained from a 500 W experimental converter are given to verify the advantages of the proposed gating scheme View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A sensorless vector control system for induction motors using q-axis flux with stator resistance identification

    Page(s): 185 - 194
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (256 KB)  

    This paper presents a sensorless vector control system for general-purpose induction motors, which is based on the observer theory and the adaptive control theories. The proposed system includes a rotor speed estimator using a q-axis flux and stator resistance identifier using the d-axis flux. The advantages of the proposed system are simplicity and avoidance of problems caused by using only a voltage model. Since the mathematical model of this system is constructed in a synchronously rotating reference frame, a linear model is easily derived for analyzing the system stability, including the influence of the observer gain, motor operating state, and parameter variations. In order to obtain stable low-speed operation and speed control accuracy, an algorithm for compensating for the deadtime of the inverter and correcting the nonideal features of an insulated gate bipolar transistor was developed. The effectiveness of the proposed system has been verified by digital simulation and experimentation View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Piezomechanics using intelligent variable-structure control

    Page(s): 47 - 59
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (400 KB)  

    The so-called piezomechanics contain three parts: piezoelectric translator, carriage mechanism, and control system. It is well known that piezomechanics have three drawbacks: (1) it should only be loaded axially; (2) it contains a hysteresis feature; and (3) its expansion is dependent on temperature. The first drawback is tackled by the design of the carriage mechanism. This paper focuses on dealing with the second and third drawbacks by using an intelligent variable-structure control. First, a neural network is employed to learn the dynamics of the piezomechanism. Second, a novel forward control based on the learned model is employed to achieve an acceptable tracking result. Because the tracking performance by a forward control cannot be guaranteed as the system is subject to uncertainties, a discrete-time variable-structure control is synthesized to improve the performance. No state estimator is required for the proposed control. The stability of the overall system is verified via the Lyapunov analysis. Experiments are also presented to confirm the effectiveness of the proposed control View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Modeling and small-signal analysis of controlled on-time boost power-factor-correction circuit

    Page(s): 136 - 142
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (184 KB)  

    A large-signal average model for the controlled on-time boost power-factor-correction (PFC) circuit is developed and subsequently linearized, resulting in a small-signal model for the PFC circuit. AC analyses are performed using the small-signal model, revealing new results on the small-signal dynamics of the PFC circuit. The analysis results and model predictions are confirmed with experimental measurements on a 200-W prototype PFC circuit View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The fusion of computationally intelligent methodologies and sliding-mode control-a survey

    Page(s): 4 - 17
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (232 KB)  

    This paper surveys how some “intelligence” can be incorporated in sliding-mode controllers (SMCs) by the use of computational intelligence methodologies in order to alleviate the well-known problems met in practical implementations of SMCs. The use of variable-structure system theory in design and stability analysis of fuzzy controllers is also discussed by drawing parallels between fuzzy control and SMCs. An overview of the research and applications reported in the literature in this respect is presented View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An improved energy-saving scheme for capacitor-run induction motor

    Page(s): 238 - 240
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (60 KB)  

    Conventionally, the speed of a capacitor run single-phase induction motor is controlled by using an AC voltage controller (generally a triac) between the supply voltage and the motor. This letter proposes a new scheme, in which the triac is inserted in series with the main winding, while the motor auxiliary winding remains directly connected across the supply voltage. The experimental results indicate the superiority of the new method suggested in this letter View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Obstacle avoidance in person following for vision-based autonomous land vehicle guidance using vehicle location estimation and quadratic pattern classifier

    Page(s): 205 - 215
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (232 KB)  

    An obstacle avoidance method for use in person following for vision-based autonomous land vehicle (ALV) guidance is proposed. This method is based on the use of vehicle location estimation and a quadratic pattern classifier, and aims to guide the ALV to follow a walking person in front by navigating along a derived collision-free path. Before generating the collision-free path, the person's location is obtained from extracted objects in the image by a person detection method. The object closest to a predicted person location is regarded as the followed person and the remaining objects are regarded as obstacles. The collision-free navigation path is designed for ALV guidance in such a way that the ALV not only can keep following the person but also can avoid collision with nearby obstacles. The navigation path results from a quadratic classifier that uses the vehicle and all of the objects in the image as input patterns. A turn angle is then computed to drive the ALV to follow the navigation path. Successful navigation sessions confirm the feasibility of the approach View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Sliding-mode-controlled slider-crank mechanism with fuzzy neural network

    Page(s): 60 - 70
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (272 KB)  

    The dynamic response of a sliding-mode-controlled slider-crank mechanism, which is driven by a permanent-magnet (PM) synchronous servo motor, is studied in this paper. First, a position controller is developed based on the principles of sliding-mode control. Moreover, to relax the requirement of the bound of uncertainties in the design of a sliding-mode controller, a fuzzy neural network (FNN) sliding-mode controller is investigated, in which a FNN is adopted to adjust the control gain in a switching control law on line to satisfy the sliding mode condition. In addition, to guarantee the convergence of tracking error, analytical methods based on a discrete-type Lyapunov function are proposed to determine the varied learning rates of the FNN. Numerical and experimental results show that the dynamic behaviors of the proposed controller-motor-mechanism system are robust with regard to parametric variations and external disturbances. Furthermore, compared with the sliding-mode controller, smaller control effort results and the chattering phenomenon is much reduced by the proposed FNN sliding-mode controller View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Fuzzy sliding-mode controllers with applications

    Page(s): 38 - 46
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (212 KB)  

    This paper concerns the design of robust control systems using sliding-mode control that incorporates a fuzzy tuning technique. The control law superposes equivalent control, switching control, and fuzzy control. An equivalent control law is first designed using pole placement. Switching control is then added to guarantee that the state reaches the sliding mode in the presence of parameter and disturbance uncertainties. Fuzzy tuning schemes are employed to improve control performance and to reduce chattering in the sliding mode. The practical application of fuzzy logic is proposed here as a computational-intelligence approach to engineering problems associated with sliding-mode controllers. The proposed method can have a number of industrial applications including the joint control of a hydraulically actuated mini-excavator as presented in this paper. The control hardware is described together with simulated and experimental results. High performance and attenuated chatter are achieved. The results obtained verify the validity of the proposed control approach to dynamic systems characterized by severe uncertainties View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Robust nonlinear nominal-model following control to overcome deadzone nonlinearities

    Page(s): 177 - 184
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (132 KB)  

    A robust nonlinear nominal-model following control is proposed to overcome deadzone nonlinearities which are unavoidable in many physical systems due to the imperfections of system components. First, an ideal linear nominal model of the plant and a model controller are employed to generate an ideal reference output. Then, a nonlinear robust loop controller is added to force the actual output to follow the ideal reference output. The robust loop controller contains an ordinary proportional-integral-derivative controller combined with a deadband relay. The added deadband relay has the capability of reducing nonlinear effects of the plant. A systematic design methodology is established and it is linked to the conventional control system design. The proposed scheme is practically applied to the control of a DC motor position servo system containing a severe deadzone nonlinearity. Both simulation and experimental results have illustrated the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed technique View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An adaptive fuzzy sliding-mode controller

    Page(s): 18 - 31
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (332 KB)  

    This paper deals with a new adaptive fuzzy sliding-mode controller and its application to a robot manipulator arm. The theory for this approach and for the heuristics-based linguistic adaptation is presented, and a mathematical description is derived. Furthermore, an application of this adaptive controller for a two-link robot arm is shown. The obtained results show the high efficiency of the new controller type View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Reduction of crosstalk on printed circuit board using genetic algorithm in switching power supply

    Page(s): 235 - 238
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (108 KB)  

    Crosstalk between printed circuit board (PCB) traces in switching power supplies may cause high electromagnetic interference emission. PCB layout plays an important part and a genetic algorithm (GA) is used to produce a layout with reduced crosstalk. A coupling index and a new way of representing a trace for the GA process is presented View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Torque-maximizing field-weakening control: design, analysis, and parameter selection

    Page(s): 161 - 168
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (212 KB)  

    The torque-maximizing field-weakening control scheme proposed by Kim and Sul is developed further. The performance under imperfect field orientation conditions is investigated, and it is shown that an overestimated-rather than an underestimated-model leakage inductance should be used. A slightly modified algorithm, which offers better robustness and reduced computational complexity, is presented. The importance, for good performance, of combining the scheme with current and speed controllers featuring antiwindup and improved disturbance rejection is emphasized. The dynamics of the resulting closed-loop system are analyzed. Obtained in the process, are rules for selection of all controller parameters, allowing tuning without trial-and error steps. Good performance of the resulting system is verified experimentally View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Analysis and design of a self-oscillating class E ballast for compact fluorescent lamps

    Page(s): 151 - 160
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (220 KB)  

    The Class E inverter is the basis for a low-cost high-frequency ballast, but the control system is more complex than the self-oscillating Class D inverter. The added complexity neutralizes any cost savings gained by the single switch inverter. This paper explores a novel self-oscillating Class E ballast from a design perspective. A qualitative analysis shows how this self-oscillating system operates, from startup, through ignition to the steady state. Optimum component values are found from a quantitative analysis of the inverter. This mathematical model is the basis for the design methodology. Analytical results are compared with the physical model View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A composite soft-switching inverter configuration with unipolar pulsewidth modulation control

    Page(s): 118 - 126
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (212 KB)  

    This paper presents a new composite soft-switching configuration for single-phase inverters where power bridge leg modules are used. The presented configuration consists of only one inductor and one capacitor as well as two low-power-rated switches/diodes for full-bridge circuits. It can realize snubber functions and/or resonant zero-current switching at any load current for switches in power inverters with unipolar sinusoid pulse width modulation control. The idea presented here is that soft-switching processes at turn-on and turn-off for each active switch in inverters can be different. The detailed circuit operational processes, simulation waveforms, and experimental results are included View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Feasibility of using ultrasonic flexural waves as a cooling mechanism

    Page(s): 143 - 150
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (224 KB)  

    The potential convective heat transfer capability of an ultrasonic flexural wave (UFW) is experimentally investigated. The UFW includes an ultrasonic flexural standing wave (USW) and an ultrasonic flexural traveling wave (UTW). The factors that might affect the cooling performance of the UFW are investigated. Those include the vibration amplitude of the UFW, the gap between the cooling source and the object above it, and the temperature of the object being cooled. It was observed that the temperature drop increased with the vibration amplitude. At gaps below 100 μm, a temperature drop was not observed. As the gap was increased to more than 100 μm, the temperature drop increased until it reached an optimum gap producing maximum temperature drop. Beyond the optimum gap, the temperature drop began to decrease. Also, it was observed that the temperature drop increased as the temperature difference between the object and ambient air increased. The cooling performance of the USW and UTW was investigated and compared. The differences in cooling performance were found to be insignificant. This indicates that acoustic streaming is the dominant factor in the convective heat transfer using the UFW. However, using resonance, the UTW creates a temperature drop six times greater than the UTW for a given power supply. With the USW having a vibration amplitude of 25 μm, an object at 98°C was cooled down to 58°C in 5 min. The temperature drop obtained by using the USW was approximately 80% of a conventional fan oriented with respect to the heated object such that the maximum heat transfer occurs. The UFW-based fan offers advantages over the conventional fan, such as silent operation, minimal heat dissipation, lack of wearing parts, and slim profile. These benefits make the fan an ideal candidate for cooling miniature parts in an enclosed workspace. Finally, a possible design option for minimizing the fan using thin-film PZT is presented View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics encompasses the applications of electronics, controls and communications, instrumentation and computational intelligence for the enhancement of industrial and manufacturing systems and processes.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Carlo Cecati
DISIM - Univ. degli Studi dell'Aquila
67100 Aquila, Italy
c.cecati@ieee.org
Phone: +39 0862 434 450
Fax: +39 0862 1960 411