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Software Engineering Journal

Issue 2 • Date Mar 1990

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Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • Specifying restrictions on imperative programming languages for use in a distributed embedded environment

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 93 - 104
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (812 KB)  

    Presents a language-independent specification of how the use of a common class of imperative programming languages can be restricted for a distributed environment. A simple formal model, in Z, of imperative programming languages is developed, and restrictions are specified. The model is then instantiated for the languages Ada, Modula and C. It gives good results for Ada and Modula, but cannot be elegantly applied to C because the language lacks both a module and process facility. A distributed Ada programming environment based on the model is described briefly View full abstract»

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  • Method rule checking in a generic design editing system

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 105 - 115
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (868 KB)  

    Describes a means of incorporating method rule checking in a design editing system intended to support the production of designs expressed in method-specific diagrammatic notations. The novel characteristic of this editing system is the fact that it may be tailored to any notation using a method description language and a graphical tool to define the vocabulary of the notation. Syntactic and semantic rules are expressed in the method description language and are checked, interactively, during an editing session View full abstract»

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  • Specifying and generating multilanguage software development environments

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 125 - 137
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (964 KB)  

    Integrated software environments use a project information base (PIB) as a repository of all project-related data. A software environment supporting a lifecycle methodology requires a multilanguage PIB, with component languages dedicated to various aspects and phases of project development. At the same time, one has to view a PIB as a database (or even a knowledge base), where project information is stored, and from which it may be queried using database methods. Therefore, a model for PIBs should equally address linguistic and database aspects of the project information representation. The goal of the paper is to introduce a formal model for multilanguage environments, suitable for representing PIBs. It builds the model by extending attribute grammars and integrating them with the entity-relationship model. It also studies basic properties of the formalism, formulates conditions to be obeyed by well formed specifications and describes an implementation View full abstract»

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  • Measures of testability as a basis for quality assurance

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 86 - 92
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (520 KB)  

    Program testing is the most used technique for analytical quality assurance. A lot of time and effort is devoted to this task during the software lifecycle, and it would be useful to have a means for estimating this testing effort. Such estimates could be used, on one hand, for guiding construction and, on the other, to help organise the development process and testing. Thus the effort needed for testing is an important quality attribute of a program; they call it its testability. They argue that a relevant program characteristic contributing to testability is the number of test cases needed for satisfying a given test strategy. They show how this can be measured for glass (white) box testing strategies based on control flow. In this case, one can use structural measures defined on control flowgraphs which can be derived from the source code. In doing so, two well researched areas of software engineering testing strategies and structural metrication are brought together View full abstract»

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  • Concept acquisition and analysis for requirements specification

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 116 - 124
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (704 KB)  

    Arguably the most critical of all software development activities is that of requirements specification. Contemporary system development methods address this task in the context of a prescriptive approach, which recognises the need for well identified steps within which a developer builds models on the basis of the method's requirements specification language. The paper proposes that this approach needs to be augmented by the use of informal models which assist in the very early steps of the requirements specification process. To this end, it discusses the use of a knowledge representation formalism, which provides the necessary foundation for capturing and analysing concepts about an application domain, and a prototype system which assists in this process View full abstract»

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  • Structured planning: deriving project views

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 138 - 148
    Cited by:  Patents (5)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (584 KB)  

    Structured planning draws on the systems modelling approach of structured analysis and applies those ideas to project planning: the traditional elements of a project plan, the work breakdown structure and PERT diagram, are replaced by a levelled work flow diagram and a deliverable dictionary. A technique for providing flexible summaries of the new project model, viewing, has been defined to assist with project tracking and control. The paper develops a formal definition of work flow diagrams and the technique of viewing in order to lay a theoretical foundation for structured planning, such that a complete set of operations to build and edit a levelled work flow diagram and deliverable dictionary can be specified and implemented in an automated project management tool View full abstract»

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