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Software, IEE Proceedings -

Issue 4 • Date Aug 2000

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Displaying Results 1 - 4 of 4
  • Tool support for integrating extended enterprises

    Page(s): 101 - 108
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (892 KB)  

    A current EPSRC project, product introduction process: a simulation in the extended enterprise (PIPSEE) is discussed. PIPSEE attempts to improve the execution of the product introduction process (PIP) within an extended enterprise in the aerospace sector. The modus operandi for accomplishing this has been to develop process understanding amongst a core team, spanning four different companies, through process modelling, review and improvement recommendation. In parallel, a Web-based simulation capability is being used to conduct simulation experiments, and to disseminate findings by training others in the lessons that have been learned. It is intended that the use of the PIPSEE simulator should encourage radical thinking about the “fuzzy front end” of the PIP. This presents a topical, exciting and challenging research problem View full abstract»

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  • Interactive multimedia synchronisation in the distributed environment using the formal approach

    Page(s): 131 - 143
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1572 KB)  

    Several synchronisation problems should be solved in order to develop interactive multimedia applications in the distributed environment. These problems include intra-medium synchronisation, inter-media synchronisation, and interactive synchronisation. The dynamic extended finite state machine (DEFSM) model, and the corresponding control schemes to handle four VCR-like user interactions, i.e. reverse, skip, freeze-restart, and scale, in distributed interactive multimedia presentations are proposed. The development of a distributed interactive multimedia synchronization specification and execution system is also described. The synchronisation specification and execution system is based on the proposed DEFSM model and the corresponding synchronisation control schemes. The DEFSM model and the control schemes can be incorporated as the synchronisation control kernel of distributed interactive multimedia systems. In this way, system developers do not need to deal with the details of multimedia synchronisation View full abstract»

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  • Using domain specific languages to instantiate object-oriented frameworks

    Page(s): 109 - 116
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (652 KB)  

    Prior research has shown that high levels of software reuse can be achieved through the use of object-oriented frameworks. An object-oriented framework captures the common aspects of a family of applications, thus allowing the designers and implementers to reuse this experience at the design and code levels. In spite of being a powerful design solution, frameworks are not always easy to use. A technique is described that uses domain specific languages (DSL) to describe the framework variation points and therefore syntactically assure the creation of valid framework instances. This approach allows framework users to develop applications without the worry of framework implementation, so allowing them to remain focused on the problem domain. In addition, the use of DSLs allows for better error handling, when compared to the standard approach of adapting frameworks by directly adding subclasses. The DSL programs are translated to the framework instantiation code using a transformational system. The approach is illustrated through two real-world frameworks View full abstract»

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  • Design and specification of role based access control policies

    Page(s): 117 - 129
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1388 KB)  

    The authors describe a language based approach to the specification of authorisation policies that can be used to support the range of access control policies in commercial object systems. They discuss the issues involved in the design of a language for role based access control systems. The notion of roles is used as a primitive construct within the language. The basic constructs of the language are discussed and the language is used to specify several access control policies such as role based access control; static and dynamic separation of duty delegation and joint action based access policies. The language is flexible and is able to capture meta-level operations, and it is often these features which are significant when it comas to the applicability of an access control system to practical real situations View full abstract»

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