By Topic

Software, IEEE

Issue 6 • Date Nov.-Dec. 2000

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 20 of 20
  • Practical programming advice - The Pragmatic Programmer: From Journeyman to Master[Book Review]

    Page(s): 108 - 109
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (54 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Organizing the rable - Introduction to the Team Software Process[Book Review]

    Page(s): 109 - 110
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (75 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Critical factors affecting personal software processes

    Page(s): 76 - 83
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (128 KB)  

    Personal software process quality helps determine the success of software projects and organizations. Although encouraging, previous studies treated the Personal Software Process approach as a black-box tool for personal process improvement. We dig deeper into the factors affecting personal processes. It is concluded that A/FR (appraisal to failure ratio) and Yield (percentage of defects removed before first compile) are two critical factors affecting personal software processes. Because the findings are limited to one experiment involving subjects in a university setting, developers in an industrial environment should use them with caution. We expect readers to view this article as hopeful; we call for more of such studies in academia and industry. With additional studies, we can collectively build stronger theories underlying personal software processes View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An experience report on the personal software process

    Page(s): 85 - 89
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (120 KB)  

    Individual developers can use quality analysis and management techniques that many consider applicable only to projects and organizations. One of the authors, a software practitioner, explains how the personal software process (PSP) gave him the training he needed. The software industry's demand to achieve predictability and consistency in the face of rapid change is significant. The PSP framework helps an individual to meet these demands. Using the PSP has provided the author with several benefits. His estimation accuracy has improved significantly. However, adding more data to his historical database will help further improve his estimating skills. As it is said: “there is no substitute for hard work to be successful”. Similarly, “there is no substitute for more data to improve an individual's personal processes”. The author's current goal is to narrow the percentage error in his estimates to within roughly 5%. He also plans to focus on improving early defect removal through more effective reviews and preventing defects by improving skills and practices View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The work culture at cisco systems

    Page(s): 16 - 18
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (80 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The successful diffusion of innovations: guidance for software development organizations

    Page(s): 96 - 103
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (132 KB)  

    Using the personal software process (PSP) as an example of an innovative information technology, the authors performed a field study of developers using the PSP approach on software development projects in industry. Their analysis of the results offers practical guidance on how software development organizations should support the diffusion of innovations into successful practice View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Keep your bots to yourself [software law]

    Page(s): 106 - 107
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (80 KB)  

    There are now a variety of Web bots or spiders available to scour the Web to automatically gather information. Bots, sometimes called agents when they are instructed to perform particular searches, are useful in performing the time-consuming and repetitive searches required to gather comparison data or to find an elusive item. In some cases, agents can not only find information but can make a purchase or take another action based on the data they collect. Although bots are great for consumers, some Internet retailers hate them. Just as a brick and mortar store wants potential customers to walk in the door, Web retailers want potential customers to personally view their sites. Once there, consumers might purchase the initial products they were seeking and then see advertisements or buy accessories, upgrades, or unrelated additional items as well. Because bots can reduce or eliminate these possibilities, some Internet retailers are trying to stop them. It's one thing to be upset about bots, spiders, agents, and data miners, but it is quite another to put an end to the practice. It should come as no surprise that federal and state laws in the US do not expressly mention bots. Those seeking to challenge their use must resort to a variety of more generic laws, none of which fit very well View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Using inspection data for defect estimation

    Page(s): 36 - 43
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (164 KB)  

    To control projects, managers need accurate and timely feedback on the quality of the software product being developed. I propose subjective team estimation models calculated from individual estimates and investigate the accuracy of defect estimation models based on inspection data View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Improving size estimates using historical data

    Page(s): 27 - 35
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (488 KB)  

    A software project's estimate of effort commonly requires input specifying the project size, and a reliable size estimate depends on many factors. This study examines a completed C++ project and considers programming artifacts that we can readily trace to requirements and early class design View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The decline and fall of high-tech corporate culture

    Page(s): 12 - 15
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (376 KB)  

    Spurred by a universal dislike or even hatred of their jobs, many people in software development and testing positions change jobs or companies almost annually. Companies suffer as a consequence, because the already huge costs of recruiting, hiring and re-training are growing every month. People suffer because this misery is an enormous drain on their individual resources. What causes this rapid turnover? Are there cures? What has changed in high-tech corporate culture that leads to mass discontent, and what can we do about it? To answer these questions, the author offers her perspective, having worked in a variety of software development, project management and executive positions for the last 20 years View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The realities of language conversions

    Page(s): 111 - 124
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (172 KB)  

    Billions of lines written in Cobol, PL/I, and other mature high level languages are still in active use. Many developers have tried to convert these languages to more modern ones, but few have succeeded. The article sheds light on the realities of language conversions and discusses the possibilities and limitations of automated language converters View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Enhancing the Cocomo estimation models

    Page(s): 45 - 49
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (128 KB)  

    In software engineering, team task assignments appear to have a significant potential impact on a project's overall success. The authors propose task assignment effort adjustment factors that can help tune existing estimation models. They show significant improvements in the predictive abilities of both Cocomo I and II by enhancing them with these factors View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Applying the PSP in industry

    Page(s): 90 - 95
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (108 KB)  

    The Personal Software Process is designed for engineers working in isolated settings. The author describes a case study where he introduced the PSP in an industrial environment and that effort raised the issues of: training form and duration, resistance to change, independence and dependence between the single programmer and his or her team, overhead in data collection and tool support, and sustainability of measure. We addressed these problems by considerably modifying the PSP for that environment. One year after its introduction, only part of the PSP is still in use. The PSP proved to be more useful as a model to inspire a process improvement effort than as an off-the-shelf process to be reused without modification. Although the modifications cannot be generalized, the experience gained can View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Process certification: a double-edged sword

    Page(s): 104 - 105
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (76 KB)  

    On 27 June 2000, health authorities in Osaka city received a call from the hospital. They learned that people were suffering from diarrhoea, stomach pains, and vomiting after drinking low-fat milk products produced by Snow Brand Milk Product, one of Japan's largest dairy companies. On 1 July, officials at a medical laboratory in Wakayama prefecture announced that, when they tested the milk the victims had drunk, they detected a gene linked to the toxin present in yellow staphylococcus, an exit toxin found in leftover milk. Milk is far easier to test than software, because we can physically and chemically measure it. However, processing milk is similar to the software development process in terms of tangibility. Consequently, process is an essential part of both food production and software development, which is why both industries require process standards. Thus, the software community can learn from the fiasco at Snow Brand. In particular, there are four areas on which we should focus: process logs are easily faked; process is not a final objective; safety is the highest priority; and formal certification and authorization are a double-edged sword View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Can aspect-oriented programming lead to more reliable software?

    Page(s): 19 - 21
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (120 KB)  

    Aspect-oriented programming (AOP) is a novel topic in the software engineering and languages communities. AOP appears to have the potential to significantly improve the reliability of programs, particularly by modularizing error-handling policies and allowing for easier maintenance and better reuse. In this article, we introduce AspectJ, the first AOP language, and demonstrate how you can use it to construct more reliable software View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Quantifying the effects of process improvement on effort

    Page(s): 65 - 70
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (380 KB)  

    When organizations make many improvements concurrently, software project managers have no way of determining how much improvement is due to process maturity versus other factors. Using a 161-project sample, the article isolates the effects on effort of process maturity versus other effects, concluding that an increase of one process maturity level can reduce development effort by 4% to 11% View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Web development: estimating quick-to-market software

    Page(s): 57 - 64
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (960 KB)  

    Developers can use this new sizing metric called Web Objects and an adaptation of the Cocomo II model called WebMo to more accurately estimate Web based software development effort and duration. Based on work with over 40 projects, these estimation tools are especially useful for quick-to-market development efforts View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Empirically guided software effort guesstimation

    Page(s): 51 - 56
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (844 KB)  

    Project LEAP (lightweight, empirical, antimeasurement dysfunction, and portable toolkit) is investigating tools and methods to support low-cost, empirically based software developer improvement. LEAP contains tools to simplify the collection of size and effort data. The collected data serves as input to a set of estimation tools. These tools can produce over a dozen analytical estimates of the effort required for a new project given an estimate of its size. To do this, they use various estimation methods such as linear, logarithmic, or exponential regressions. During project planning, the developer can review these estimates and select one of them or substitute a guesstimate based on his or her experience. The authors' study provides evidence that guesstimates, when informed by low-cost analytical methods, might be the most accurate method View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

IEEE Software's mission is to build the community of leading and future software practitioners. The magazine delivers reliable, useful, leading-edge software development information to keep engineers and managers abreast of rapid technology change

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Forrest Shull
Fraunhofer Center for Experimental Software Engineering