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Communications Magazine, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date Jan. 2001

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Displaying Results 1 - 16 of 16
  • Frame relay: technology and practice [Book Review]

    Page(s): 10 - 12
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Topics in internet technology: IP in 2005 - directions in wireless and optical transport [Guest Editorial]

    Page(s): 135
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (243 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The movement from monoliths to component-based network elements

    Page(s): 86 - 93
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (56 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    To be competitive in a rapidly growing market requires rapid upgrades to the performance and functionality of the network. One way to manage rapid upgrades of the network with minimum risk is to deploy equipment using a modular system architecture. Modularity allows a network operator to mix and match best of breed components to achieve the desired system rather than rely on vendors to implement specific technology before making crucial business decisions. This article begins with an overview of the current global movement toward standards that support network elements with modular system architecture. The story begins with university initiatives and the forming of OpenSig and IEEE P1520 more than five years ago, continuing with related and complementary initiatives by the Parlay Group, Softswitch Consortium, Multiservice Switching Forum, and several IETF working groups. Next, special attention is given to the component-based architecture of the Multiservice Switching Forum released in summer 2000. The trend of building network equipment from components with distinctly different functional specialties is described in three examples: media gateways, IP routers, and virtual IP routers. It is envisioned that component-based network infrastructure will spawn new markets for entrepreneurial developers, spurring competition and accelerating the creation of innovative solutions for all facets of global communications. The article concludes with a smorgasbord of new market opportunities View full abstract»

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  • Toward self-organized mobile ad hoc networks: the terminodes project

    Page(s): 118 - 124
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (152 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article provides a technical overview of mobile ad hoc networks and describes their long-term potential. It covers current research, and describes major technical challenges, including networking, real-time services, and software. It shows that by their very nature, mobile ad hoc networks can bring a paradigm shift in the way networks are organized and operated, and can even lead to a fundamental change in the relationships between information technology and societal organization. As an illustration of these concepts, the article also contains an overall description of our long-term research project, called terminodes View full abstract»

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  • MEMS technology for optical networking applications

    Page(s): 62 - 69
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    The explosion of the Internet has brought about an acute need for broadband communications, which can only be filled with optical networking. This in turn has resulted in an unprecedented interest in optical micro-electromechanical systems. Since the early days of fiber optics, it has been recognized that micro-optics was a fertile ground for the applications of MEMS. MEMS-based products offer substantial cost and performance advantages for optical networking applications in the area of switching fabrics, variable attenuators, tunable lasers, and other devices. This article provides a review of various types of MEMS technologies for optical networking applications View full abstract»

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  • High-speed lightwave communication ICs based on III-V compound semiconductors

    Page(s): 154 - 158
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    Ultra-high-speed ICs are one of the keys to achieving large-capacity lightwave communications systems. This article reviews advances in lightwave communication ICs based on III-V compound semiconductors developed to obtain next-generation 40-Gb/s/wavelength channel systems View full abstract»

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  • Traffic theory and the Internet

    Page(s): 94 - 99
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    We argue that traffic theory, an essential component in the design of traditional telecommunications networks, should be increasingly applied in the development of the multiservice Internet. We discuss the statistical characteristics of Internet traffic at different time scales. Modeling is facilitated on identifying the notion of flow and distinguishing the categories of streaming and elastic traffic. We review mathematical modeling approaches useful for predicting the relationship between demand, capacity and performance for both streaming and elastic flows. Derived results indicate the limitations of service differentiation as a means for guaranteeing QoS and highlight the importance of traditional traffic engineering approaches in ensuring that the network has sufficient capacity to handle offered demand View full abstract»

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  • Techniques for optical packet switching and optical burst switching

    Page(s): 136 - 142
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    Wavelength-division multiplexing appears to be the solution of choice for providing a faster networking infrastructure that can meet the explosive growth of the Internet. Several different technologies have been developed so far for the transfer of data over WDM. We survey two new technologies which are still in the experimental stage-optical packet switching and optical burst switching-and comment on their suitability for transporting IP traffic View full abstract»

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  • Technologies and building blocks for fast packet forwarding

    Page(s): 70 - 77
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (72 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We provide a review of the state of the art and the future of packet processing and switching. The industry's response to the need for wire-speed packet processing devices whose function can be rapidly adapted to continuously changing standards and customer requirements is the concept of special programmable network processors. We discuss the prerequisites of processing tens to hundreds of millions of packets per second and indicate ways to achieve scalability through parallel packet processing. Tomorrow's switch fabrics, which will provide node-internal connectivity between the input and output ports of a router or switch, will have to sustain terabit-per-second throughput. After reviewing fundamental switching concepts, we discuss architectural and design issues that must be addressed to allow the evolution of packet switch fabrics to terabit-per-second throughput performance View full abstract»

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  • Wireless mobile communications at the start of the 21st century

    Page(s): 110 - 116
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    At the start of the 21st century, the wireless mobile markets are witnessing unprecedented growth fueled by an information explosion and a technology revolution. In the radio frequency arena, the trend is to move from narrowband to wideband with a family of standards tailored to a variety of application needs. Many enabling technologies including wideband code-division multiple access, software-defined radio, intelligent antennas, and digital processing devices are greatly improving the spectral efficiency of third-generation systems. In the mobile network area, the trend is to move from traditional circuit-switched systems to packet-switched programmable networks that integrate both voice and packet services, and eventually evolve toward an all-IP network. Furthermore, accompanied by wireless mobile location technology, wireless mobile Internet is expected to revolutionize the services that can be provided to consumers in the right place and at the right time. Wireless mobile communications may not only complement the well established wireline network; it may also become a serious competitor in years to come. We review the history of the wireless mobile communications, examine the current progress in standards and technologies, and discuss possible trends for wireless mobile solutions View full abstract»

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  • Generalized multiprotocol label switching: an overview of routing and management enhancements

    Page(s): 144 - 150
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    Generalized multiprotocol label switching, also referred to as multiprotocol lambda switching, supports not only devices that perform packet switching, but also those that perform switching in the time, wavelength, and space domains. The development of GMPLS requires modifications to current signaling and routing protocols. It has also triggered the development of new protocols such as the Link Management protocol. We present the traffic engineering enhancements to the Open Shortest Path First Internet routing protocol and ISIS Intradomain Routing Protocol, two popular routing protocols, to support GMPLS. We present the concepts of generalized interfaces, label-switched path hierarchy, and link bundling intended to improve GMPLS scalability. We also discuss the Link Management Protocol which can be used to make the underlying links more manageable View full abstract»

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  • The impact of network convergence on telecommunications software

    Page(s): 78 - 84
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (72 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This describes a converged network architecture and then discusses why it needs to be open and programmable and how this can be accomplished. A discussion of two approaches to open/programmable networks-JAIN and Parlay-is provided to highlight the key ideas. The converged network is a key player in e-business and the next-generation applications currently being developed for the growing digital economy. We discuss the role of telecommunications bandwidth trading and application integration in next-generation applications (NGAs) and their relevance to converged networks. Some of the challenges software engineers and programmers can expect to encounter while trying to build these networks are also discussed View full abstract»

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  • Fixed broadband wireless access: state of the art, challenges, and future directions

    Page(s): 100 - 108
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    This article provides an overview of fixed broadband wireless access technology. Focusing on the band below 3 GHz, we describe BWA service and carrier needs, deployment scenarios, architectural requirements, physical layer, medium access control, and radio link protocol requirements. We characterize fixed BWA channels, outline the major challenges of fixed BWA, and study requirements for future BWA systems. Finally, we show that the use of multiple antennas at both ends of a fixed wireless link provides significant leverages View full abstract»

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  • Visual communications of tomorrow: natural, efficient, and flexible

    Page(s): 126 - 133
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    In the last decade, we have witnessed a phenomenal growth of communication and information technologies. These technologies have greatly simplified and even enriched our daily lives; cellular telephony and the Internet are probably the most striking examples. A particularly promising, and at the same time challenging, aspect of both technologies is the transmission and use of visual information. The author overviews the state of visual communication at the end of the 20th century, discusses today's challenges, and outlines some future directions View full abstract»

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  • Progress in optical networking

    Page(s): 54 - 61
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    This article summarizes the present state of optical networking, how we got to this point, and what needs to be done to complete the job. The point of departure is an assumed future two-level structure in which the transport is by means of steadily growing interconnected all-optical islands of transparency, while the remainder of the communication layers are based on IP, both levels being managed by an MPLS-based control plane. After reviewing why such networks are becoming inevitable, a review is given of the various optical layer technology and architecture bottlenecks that have had to be solved. Issues that remain center on increasing the number of channels and reducing the technology costs View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Communications Magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications systems (PCS), ISDN, and more.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Sean Moore
Centripetal Networks