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Communications Magazine, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date March 1990

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • Network management: a tutorial overview

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 20 - 25
    Cited by:  Papers (8)  |  Patents (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1072 KB)  

    The difficulties of managing information networks is explored from the perspective of today's and tomorrow's typical enterprise, whether small and large businesses, government agencies, universities, or other organizations, and eventually even residential customers. A historical review of communication network management is given, beginning with the telephone network and moving on to computer and information networks. Customer needs and market segmentation are discussed. Industry response to network management issues and requirements are examined, covering the development of OSI (Open Systems Interconnection) standards for network management, specification of companion implementation agreements, and provision for conformance testing capability.<> View full abstract»

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  • Network management and control systems and strategic issues

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 26 - 29
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1221 KB)  

    The development of a network management strategy and a network control system for the large integrated telecommunications network (ITN) at American Express Travel Related Services Company is discussed. Network control relates to operational activities such as the diagnostics, configuration, monitoring, and performance of networks, and network management relates to all of the functions performed to manage network resources. An architecture that addresses both control and management requirements is described. Network control functions are consolidated so that operations have a single interface to the system and can operate dissimilar systems from a single workstation. NETVIEW, a licensed IBM software, performs the functions of a focal point, and the network element management system (NEMS) addresses the management of network elements. The centralization of alarms and/or alerts and issuance of commands provides immediate capability to monitor and resolve network problems through a single set of terminals as well as a platform for further automation through the use of artificial intelligence technology.<> View full abstract»

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  • Who logged out my terminal?

    Publication Year: 1990
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (143 KB)  

    The author considers system crashes, focusing on the need for better methods of detecting faults. He identifies the issues that must be addressed. These include the need to filter data and produce user-oriented reports, and the role of network management.<> View full abstract»

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  • Customer network management: a service provider's view

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 31 - 34
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (581 KB)  

    Experience in providing network management for the 1986 Pan American (Pan Am) Games in Indianapolis USA are described. The situation called for an integrated solution that could manage the 5000 voice, data, and video circuits residing within several different networks providing communications for 6500 data terminals and 143 computers spanning 40 locations. The scope of network management is examined, separating it into two parts: management of the specific local exchange carrier services and integrating that with the management of all other products and services. The driving forces behind the need for customer network control are discussed. A two-stage approach to achieving that control is presented.<> View full abstract»

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  • Customer control of network management from the service provider's perspective

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 35 - 40
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1206 KB)  

    The current status of Japanese business communications and private network management is discussed, covering requirements, functions, and standardization of network management. The gap between user needs and technology as well as the issue of introduction and operating costs of management systems are examined. Technological elements that are essential to customer control of management functions are discussed, they are: an open interface, an object-oriented operation principle, and the synchronization of online database information.<> View full abstract»

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  • Managing networks in a multi-vendor environment

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 41 - 42
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (695 KB)  

    The Unified Network Management Architecture (UNMA), developed by AT&T to provide a base for network management in a multilevel environment, is discussed. The functions of data management addressed by UNMA are delineated. These comprise five functional areas recognized by the standards groups working in network management, namely configuration, faults, performance, accounting, and security, as well as the four functional areas of planning, operations, programmability, and integrated control specified by AT&T. The family of products introduced to support UNMA is described.<> View full abstract»

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  • An OSI-based interoperability architecture for managing hybrid networks

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 61 - 69
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2106 KB)  

    The management of hybrid corporate networks comprising a wide variety of equipment and services offered by different vendors and service providers is addressed. The public carrier environment in which such networks must operate is described. Five categories of system management functional areas set forth in the ISO/IEC Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) standards are defined. They are fault management, accounting management, configuration management, performance management, and security management. The interoperability architecture provided by the standards is examined, and two example applications are given: a corporate banking voice network, and OSI-based configuration management applied to automatic call distribution.<> View full abstract»

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  • IBM's network management approach

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 70 - 75
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (903 KB)  

    The management functions requested by customers, namely problem management, change management, configuration management, performance management, accounting management, and operational control of the network, are discussed, emphasizing the need for a solution that provides a seamless view of voice, data, and bandwidth management networks. IBM's approach to meeting these needs is described. It is a combination of offerings and a structure that permit the customer to mix and match IBM offerings and other vendors' offerings as well as its own products and modifications to provide a network management solution tailored to its unique requirements. Three examples of IBM's internal use of network management and a network management vision of how future networks may be managed are presented.<> View full abstract»

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  • The future of customer control

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 76 - 80
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (766 KB)  

    The state of the art in the various segments of the customer control network management business is surveyed, and projections of the future of each of these segments are presented. Among the anticipated developments discussed are the use of expert-system-based technologies to automate the alarm correlation function, convergence on five principal data network standards, the use of automated tools to reconfigure remote PBX installations, the correlation of physical and logical network management, and the emergence of new segments of the network management marketplace. Customer requirement and problems that are shaping future network management solutions are examined.<> View full abstract»

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IEEE Communications Magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications systems (PCS), ISDN, and more.

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Osman Gebizlioglu
Huawei Technologies