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IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering

Issue 10 • Date Oct 2000

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Displaying Results 1 - 7 of 7
  • A validation of the component-based method for software size estimation

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):1006 - 1021
    Cited by:  Papers (58)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (492 KB)

    Estimation of software size is a crucial activity among the tasks of software management. Work planning and subsequent estimations of the effort required are made based on the estimate of the size of the software product. Software size can be measured in several ways: lines of code (LOC) is a common measure and is usually one of the independent variables in equations for estimating several methods... View full abstract»

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  • Handling obstacles in goal-oriented requirements engineering

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):978 - 1005
    Cited by:  Papers (184)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (976 KB)

    Requirements engineering is concerned with the elicitation of high-level goals to be achieved by the envisioned system, the refinement of such goals and their operationalization into specifications of services and constraints and the assignment of responsibilities for the resulting requirements to agents such as humans, devices and software. Requirements engineering processes often result in goals... View full abstract»

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  • Handling of irregularities in human centered systems: a unified framework for data and processes

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):959 - 977
    Cited by:  Papers (4)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (320 KB)

    Practical process-support and workflow systems should be built to describe the simple, normal flow of events and then deal easily with irregularities, including tolerating deviations. Similarly, these systems should describe the normal format and constraints concerning the large amounts of data that are usually stored, but then deal with abnormalities and possibly accommodate exceptional values. W... View full abstract»

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  • Exception handling in workflow management systems

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):943 - 958
    Cited by:  Papers (120)  |  Patents (24)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1760 KB)

    Fault tolerance is a key requirement in process support systems (PSS), a class of distributed computing middleware encompassing applications such as workflow management systems and process centered software engineering environments. A PSS controls the flow of work between programs and users in networked environments based on a “metaprogram” (the process). The resulting applications are... View full abstract»

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  • The use of proof in diversity arguments

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):1022 - 1023
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (84 KB)

    The limits to the reliability that can be claimed for a design-diverse fault-tolerant system are mainly determined by the dependence that must be expected in the failure behaviours of the different versions: claims for independence between version failure processes are not believable. We examine a different approach, in which a simple secondary system is used as a back-up to a more complex primary... View full abstract»

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  • Current trends in exception handling

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):921 - 922
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (92 KB)

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  • Exception handling in the spreadsheet paradigm

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):923 - 942
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2720 KB)

    Exception handling is widely regarded as a necessity in programming languages today and almost every programming language currently used for professional software development supports some form of it. However, spreadsheet systems, which may be the most widely used type of “programming language” today in terms of number of users using it to create “programs” (spreadsheets), ... View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tse-eic@computer.org