By Topic

Industry Applications, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 5 • Date Sep/Oct 2000

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 35
  • Motor shaft voltages and bearing currents and their reduction in multilevel medium-voltage PWM voltage-source-inverter drive applications

    Page(s): 1336 - 1341
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (132 KB)  

    This paper presents test results on problems and solutions of motor shaft voltages and bearing currents in medium-voltage pulsewidth modulated (PWM) drive systems. Tests show that multilevel medium-voltage PWM voltage-source inverter drives can cause motor bearing currents, similar to a low-voltage PWM drives, even with one motor bearing insulated. Common-mode voltages generated as a result of PWM switching are observed on motor windings and capacitively coupled to the motor shaft, leading to bearing currents. Potential solutions, including altering common-mode circuitry, changing the grounding scheme, providing common-mode filtering, and grounding the motor shaft, are investigated. Test results on their effectiveness are presented View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A linear switched reluctance motor: converter and control

    Page(s): 1351 - 1359
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (364 KB)  

    The converter topology with a minimum number of power devices and control implementations to facilitate the pulsation-free force control of the linear switched reluctance machines are investigated for the first time in this paper. The minimization of the devices offers cost reduction, compact packaging, and enhanced overall reliability. With that in view, a topology with 3Nsc+3 devices is chosen where Nsc is the number of sectors in the linear machine. The propulsion force with conventional control of single-phase excitation has high-commutation torque pulsation and it is overcome with a multiphase excitation strategy, proposed in this paper. Further, the proposed control strategy reduces the normal force pulsation. A systematic step-by-step design procedure of the switching strategy for the converter known as unipolar switching strategy, proportional plus integral current controller, and gating control strategy of a long linear switched reluctance machine is presented. Experimental correlation of the proposed converter arrangement and control strategy is presented with a 4.8 m-long linear switched reluctance machine in achieving the stated objectives View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A practical approach to switching-loss reduction in a large-capacity static VAr compensator based on voltage-source inverters

    Page(s): 1396 - 1404
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (208 KB)  

    This paper presents a simple method for reduction of switching and snubbing losses in a large-capacity static VAr compensator (SVC) consisting of multiple three-phase voltage-source square-wave inverters. The proposed method is characterized by a “commutation capacitor” connected in parallel with each switching device. The commutation capacitor allows the SVC to perform zero-voltage switching, and to reduce switching losses. The electric charge stored in the commutation capacitor is not dissipated, but regenerated to the DC-link capacitor. Moreover, a soft-starting method for the SVC is also presented to avoid forming a short circuit across the commutation capacitor during startup. Experimental results obtained from a 10 kVAr laboratory setup are shown to verify the viability of the operating principle of the commutation capacitor View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Adaptive sliding-mode observer for speed-sensorless control of induction motors

    Page(s): 1380 - 1387
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (264 KB)  

    This paper presents an adaptive sliding-mode observer for the speed-sensorless field-oriented control of induction motors. The observer detects the rotor flux components in the two-phase stationary reference frame by the motor electrical equations. The motor speed is estimated by an additional relation obtained by a Lyapunov function. The analytical development of the sliding observer and the speed estimation algorithm is fully explained. Experimental results are presented, based on a TMS320F240 digital signal processor controller implementation. The system performance with different observer gains and the influence of the motor parameters deviations are shown and discussed View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Closed-loop control impact on the diagnosis of induction motors faults

    Page(s): 1318 - 1329
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (500 KB)  

    In this paper, the impact of control on faulted induction machine behavior is presented. The diagnostic indexes usually used for open-loop operation are no longer effective. Simulation and experimental results show that the spectrum of the field current component id in a field-oriented controlled machine has suitable features that can lead to an effective diagnostic procedure. Specifically, in the case of stator and rotor faults, the id spectrum components at frequencies 2f and 2sf, respectively, are quite independent of control parameters and dependent on the fault extent View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Dynamic operation of carrier-signal-injection-based sensorless direct field-oriented AC drives

    Page(s): 1360 - 1368
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (236 KB)  

    This paper analyzes the dynamic operation of carrier-signal-based sensorless field-oriented AC motor drives. The effects of the harmonics introduced by the fundamental current transients at frequencies near the carrier-signal frequency are first analyzed, then compensation based on a fundamental current observer is proposed. The utilization of such a fundamental current observer provides the possibility of modifying the analog-to-digital conversion process to increase the number of bits effectively containing spatial information and thereby substantially increasing the accuracy of the estimated rotor position or flux angle View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A control strategy for general-purpose active filters based on voltage detection

    Page(s): 1405 - 1412
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (200 KB)  

    A new control strategy to realize general-purpose active filters based on voltage detection is proposed as an economical solution to harmonic compensation in distribution lines. The proposed control method is based on real-time digital simulation of an LC filter accomplished by a digital signal processor. The adaptive gain control to realize the automatic online adjustment of the compensating characteristics is introduced. This achieves the optimum operation according to the condition of the AC lines. Thus, the proposed active filter can be used as a general-purpose active filter. In this paper, the compensation characteristics of plural units of the proposed active filters connected to a distribution line are investigated. The theoretical investigation of the compensation characteristics is presented. Furthermore, to confirm the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy, some experimental results employing a test system are included View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Zone-branch reliability methodology for analyzing industrial power systems

    Page(s): 1212 - 1218
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (216 KB)  

    There are many methods available for evaluating the frequency and duration of load point interruptions within a given industrial power system configuration. As systems become larger and more interconnected, these existing methods can become computationally bound and limited in their ability to assess the impact of unreliable protective equipment and unreliable protection-coordination schemes on individual load point reliability indexes within a given plant configuration. These methods also can often not account for complex isolation and restoration procedures within an industrial plant configuration. This paper presents a zone-branch methodology that overcomes many of these limitations and applies the methodology to a large industrial plant power system configuration. The primary advantage of the zone-branch methodology is that it can readily identify faulty protection schemes involving all the components of an industrial power system and evaluate load point reliability indexes View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Premises for the mathematical modeling of the combined corona-electrostatic field of roll-type separators

    Page(s): 1260 - 1266
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (608 KB)  

    Corona and induction charging mechanisms are frequently associated in modern roll-type electrostatic separators. Various electrode configurations have been proposed and numerous attempts have been made in order to fully characterize them. This paper approaches this problem from a computational point of view. The boundary-element method is employed for analyzing the electrostatic field distribution generated by a typical arrangement, consisting of a wire-type corona electrode and an ellipse-profile nonionizing electrode. The computed results pointed out the effect of various parameters on the uniformity of the electric field near the ionizing element and at the surface of the grounded rotating roll electrode. These data can be used by the designer in order to improve the electrode configuration, produce a uniform field in the active zone of the separator, and reduce the corona inception voltage. At the same time, they validate two important premises for the mathematical modeling of the combined corona-electrostatic held of a roll-type separator: (1) Peek's law can be used for evaluating the electric field strength at the surface of the wire electrode at corona onset in any of the usual electrode configurations; and (2) the distribution of the electric field in the active zone of the separator is affected only by the geometry of the high-voltage electrode system View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An electronic dimming ballast with bifrequency and fuzzy logic control

    Page(s): 1308 - 1317
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (292 KB)  

    This paper presents the analysis and design of a series-resonant parallel-loaded inverter applied to electronic dimming ballasts with bifrequency and fuzzy logic control. The analysis of the ballast is carried out in conjunction with the fluorescent lamp represented in a plasma model. The component values of the power stage, as well as two switching frequencies, according to the desired maximum and minimum power levels are, therefore, determined. The power levels in between are controlled by varying the ratio between two time intervals for which the two frequencies last, respectively. This mechanism is achieved by using a fuzzy logic controller (FLC). A ballast prototype with the FLC which is implemented on an 8-bit microprocessor with a reduced instruction set computer architecture has been built. Experimental measurements have shown the feasibility of the ballast with the proposed control strategy View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Root cause AC motor failure analysis with a focus on shaft failures

    Page(s): 1435 - 1448
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2808 KB)  

    The squirrel-cage induction motor remains the workhorse of the petrochemical industry because of its versatility and ruggedness. However, it has its limitations, which, if exceeded, will cause premature failure of the stator, rotor, bearings or shaft. This paper is the final abridgement and update of six previous papers for the Petroleum and Chemical Industry Committee of the IEEE Industry Applications Society presented over the last 24 years and includes the final piece dealing with shaft failures A methodology is provided that will lead operations personnel to the most likely root causes of failure. Check-off sheets are provided to assist in the orderly collection of data to assist in the analysis. As the petrochemical industry evolves from reactive to time based, to preventive, to trending, to diagnostics, and to a predictive maintenance attitude, more and more attention to root cause analysis will be required. This paper will help provide a platform for the establishment of such an evolution. The product scope includes low- and medium-voltage squirrel-cage induction motors in the 1-3000 hp range with anti friction bearings. However, much of this material is applicable to other types and sizes View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Simplified control technique for high-power-factor flyback Cuk and Sepic rectifiers operating in CCM

    Page(s): 1413 - 1418
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (248 KB)  

    Control techniques for high-power-factor rectifiers which do not need input voltage sensing are gaining considerable attention due to their simpler implementation and inherently superior stability, as compared to conventional average or peak current mode control. Among these, the solutions based on the integration of a current signal (switch, diode, or inductor current) provide an inherent noise immunity, which makes them further appealing. This paper proposes a simple implementation of one such control technique for high-power-factor flyback, Cuk, or Sepic rectifiers, which, while still retaining a high power factor, further reduces the control complexity, thus making the solution very attractive for smart-power integration. A 200 W flyback rectifier with the proposed control technique was implemented and tested. The achieved results are in good agreement with the expected performance View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Adaptive tracking controller for induction motor drives using online training of neural networks

    Page(s): 1285 - 1294
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (244 KB)  

    This paper explores means of controlling the dynamics of the stator currents of an induction motor. A neural network-based identification and control scheme is presented. A single artificial neural network is trained to capture the nonlinear dynamics of the motor. A control law is derived using the dynamics captured by the network, and employed to force the stator currents to follow prescribed trajectories. The proposed architecture adapts and generalizes its learning to a wide variety of loads and, in addition provides the necessary abstraction when measurements are contaminated with noise. Extensive simulations reveal that neural designs are effective means of system identification and control for time-varying nonlinear systems, in the presence of uncertainty. The effects of parameter changes on the performance of the network is addressed. Particular emphasis is placed on the effects of sudden, random load torque changes. The difficulties addressed by this paper include incomplete system knowledge, nonlinearity, noise and delays View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A novel two-quadrant soft-switching converter with one auxiliary switch for high-power applications

    Page(s): 1388 - 1395
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (236 KB)  

    This paper describes a newly proposed two-quadrant soft-switching (SS) converter with only one auxiliary switch suitable for various high-power applications. The proposed converter realizes SS using a simple load-side auxiliary resonant tank that consists of a switching device, a diode, and an inductor. With a novel fixed-timing control scheme, the resonant current varies with the load current to achieve near zero-voltage turn-on and lossless snubber turn-off at all current conditions. There is no need for any sophisticated control algorithms and sensors. Computer simulation and hardware implementation were performed with a 15 kVA converter to validate the proposed converter. A comprehensive evaluation indicates that the SS gains significant benefits over the conventional hard-switching counterpart View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Pattern recognition for modeling and online diagnosis of bioprocesses

    Page(s): 1295 - 1299
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (120 KB)  

    Bioprocesses are highly nonlinear and they operate within a wide range of operating regimes. Proper modeling and control of these processes necessitate real-time identification of these regimes. In this paper, the authors introduce an approach for the development of a fuzzy neural network (NN) model for a bioprocess based on decomposition of the process into its different regimes. The model consists of multiple linear local models, one for each regime, and its output is the interpolation of the outputs from the local models. Regime identification is performed using fuzzy clustering and NNs. The outcome of this identification technique is a set of membership functions which indicate to what degree the process is governed by the three operating regimes at any given point in time. The method is illustrated through the development of a real-time product estimation model for a simulated gluconic acid batch fermentation View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Using rainwear as switching jackets: a reasonable solution for electric arc exposure

    Page(s): 1241 - 1246
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (172 KB)  

    Louisville Gas and Electric, Louisville, KY, USA, has tested numerous types of clothing for worker protection under electric arc exposure situations and discusses the test methods used, along with practical application of the arc thermal protective value and heat attenuation factor results which are being reported by manufacturers of arc-resistant clothing. This paper focuses on the newly discovered and documented feasibility of using flame-resistant (FR) rainwear in high fault current switching applications. This paper includes data and a comparison of several popular rainwear materials in their performance under electrical arc conditions. Some of these rainsuits have been shown by mannequin testing to withstand arcs up to 30 000 A, 15 cycles without sustained fire or ignition of clothing covered. Using rainwear as switching jackets could allow “double-duty” use of rainsuits in plants and on line trucks. Further, Neoprene/Nomex and some PVC/Nomex/Kevlar rainsuits have, in testing, proven more protective than woven Nomex “switching jackets” costing substantially more View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • DC ripple current reduction on a single-phase PWM voltage-source rectifier

    Page(s): 1419 - 1429
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (304 KB)  

    A novel topology of single-phase pulsewidth modulation (PWM) voltage-source rectifier capable of achieving not only a sinusoidal input current, but also a zero-ripple output current, is presented. The rectifier consists of a conventional single-phase PWM voltage-source rectifier, a pair of additional switches and an inductor. Hence, the proposed rectifier requires neither a large DC capacitor nor a passive L-C resonant circuit. The input current control is achieved by the conventional PWM current control technique. However, DC ripple current reduction control is difficult because one of the switching legs in the DC ripple current reduction circuit is shared with the PWM rectifier circuit. Two control methods, referred to here as the DC C inductor method and the AC inductor method, are proposed for DC ripple reduction, and the characteristics of these control methods are discussed. These control methods are implemented using a microprocessor, and the effectiveness of the circuit is confirmed experimentally. This rectifier has useful applications in uninterruptible power systems and DC power supplies, especially for cases in which the batteries are connected in parallel to the DC line View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A motor primer. I

    Page(s): 1455 - 1466
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (436 KB)  

    Much has been written about applying motors on variable-speed drives, high-speed rigid shaft motors, impact on API Standard 541, motor diagnostics, etc. Most of these papers and articles assume that the reader has significant knowledge of motor theory and operation. However, this assumption is overly optimistic, considering that few if any, colleges teach motor theory today and that application experience at motor user locations has been reduced. This paper is the first of a series of papers. The authors present induction motor theory and application information with an extensive reference list that will help engineers understand such questions as: what causes a motor to make noise? Why is a medium-voltage motor different than a low-voltage motor? How should a motor be grounded? etc. This paper serves as a valuable reference for those who apply and specify motors View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Analysis of a novel four-level DC/DC boost converter

    Page(s): 1342 - 1350
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (188 KB)  

    In this paper, novel two-quadrant buck/boost and one-quadrant boost four-level DC/DC power converters are introduced. The primary application for these converters is that of interfacing a low-voltage DC source, such as a fuel cell or battery, to a high-voltage four-level inverter. One important feature of the four-level DC/DC power converters proposed is the ability to perform the power conversion and balance the inverter capacitor voltages simultaneously. With the capacitor voltage balancing, it is possible to obtain the full voltage from the inverter. For the boost converter, the steady-state and nonlinear average-value (NLAM) models are developed. The NLAM is verified against a detailed simulation of a four-level converter/inverter drive system. The proposed converter is experimentally verified using an 18 kW converter/inverter system View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An analytical approach to solving motor vibration problems

    Page(s): 1467 - 1480
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (300 KB)  

    Vibration problems in induction motors can be extremely frustrating and may lead to greatly reduced reliability. It is imperative, in all operations and manufacturing processes that downtime is avoided or minimized. If a problem does occur, the source of the problem is quickly identified and corrected. With proper knowledge and diagnostic procedures, it is normally possible to quickly pinpoint the cause of the vibration. All too often, erroneous conclusions are reached as a consequence of not understanding the root cause of the vibration. This may result in trying to fix an incorrectly diagnosed problem, spending a significant amount of time and money in the process. By utilizing the proper data collection and analysis techniques, the true source of the vibration can be discovered. This includes, but is not limited to, the following: electrical imbalance; mechanical unbalance-motor, coupling, or driven equipment; mechanical effects-looseness, rubbing, bearings, etc.; external effects-base, driven equipment, misalignment, etc.; resonance, critical speeds, reed critical, etc. Once the electrical and mechanical interactions in a motor are understood, and the influence external components have on the apparent motor vibration, identification of the offending component is usually straightforward. This paper provides an analytical approach for expeditiously understanding and solving these types of problems View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Removal of NF3 from semiconductor-process flue gases by tandem packed-bed plasma and adsorbent hybrid systems

    Page(s): 1251 - 1259
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (272 KB)  

    A tandem hybrid gas cleanup system, consisting of a BaTiO3 packed-bed plasma reactor and a CaCO3 adsorbent filter, was used to study the removal of NF3 from semiconductor-process flue gases. Plasma-chemical kinetics of N2 -NF3-O2-H2 gas mixtures suggested byproducts observed in the experiments. The laboratory-scale system showed NF3 removal at atmospheric pressure. Typically, 100% NF3 abatement was achieved with an inlet concentration of 5000 ppm and a gas residence time in the reactor less than 10 s View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Determination of d and q reactances of permanent-magnet synchronous motors without measurements of the rotor position

    Page(s): 1330 - 1335
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (132 KB)  

    The interest in permanent-magnet synchronous motors (PMSMs) is increasing in a wide area of applications. Since most PMSMs will operate without a shaft sensor in the future, valuable information for experimental determination of machine parameters will be lost. In this paper, therefore, a method is presented where the induced EMF and the d-axis reactance are determined in a no-load test and the q-axis reactance is determined in a load test. The load angle δ is determined from the load test by means of a new analytical method. In this way, no separate measurement of the load angle is required. The method is especially suitable for line-start PMSMs which normally operate with negative d-axis current and, therefore, are not saturated in the d-axis flux paths. Moreover, the method is very simple to carry out for any laboratory technician, since the only tests that have to be made are standard tests which are made on standard induction motors on a regular basis View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • New life for old thyristor power rectifiers using contemporary digital control

    Page(s): 1449 - 1454
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (388 KB)  

    This paper presents information on a control and monitoring system retrofit of two unreliable 1978 14 MW rectifiers used in a sodium chlorate plant. Reasons for the upgrade and expectations of the new system are discussed. Alternate solutions considered and the rationale supporting the choices made are reviewed. The paper summarizes the project from the initial investigation through the design process and selection of equipment. Justification of the expenditure, issues of mating old and new equipment, problems overcome during the implementation, and the lessons learned are described. In closing, the suitability of this approach for other rectifier installations is addressed View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Dual stator winding induction machine drive

    Page(s): 1369 - 1379
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (420 KB)  

    A new dual stator winding induction machine drive is described in this paper. The proposed induction machine consists of a standard squirrel-cage rotor and a stator with two separate windings wound for a dissimilar number of poles. Each stator winding is fed from an independent variable-frequency variable-voltage inverter. The proposed drive offers such advantages as speed sensorless operation, better reliability, and more flexibility to manipulate the resultant torque-speed curve of the motor. In the proposed drive, zero-speed operation is achieved by independently controlling the two sets of stator currents, hence, maintaining a minimum electrical frequency independent of the mechanical speed. This feature is especially important to minimize the negative impact of the stator resistance influence at low-speed operation and it greatly simplifies the implementation of speed sensorless control schemes. The drive is well suited for either constant volts per hertz or field-oriented (FO) operation. Circulating harmonic currents, common to most dual stator machines, are eliminated by the dissimilar pole number in each stator winding View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Prediction of magnetic fields in multiconductor systems with significant harmonic currents

    Page(s): 1206 - 1211
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (140 KB)  

    Electric and magnetic fields produced by transmission systems have received strong interest both for biological effects and for interference with electrical and electronic devices, measuring sets, computers, control systems, etc. A deeper attention has been more recently devoted to magnetic fields which are difficult to screen and which can be significant when produced by transmission, but also by distribution and utilization systems. This paper proposes a simplified approach which seems to be useful in the case of lines set up by cables and, in particular, when more cables are connected in parallel, considering currents affected by significant harmonics content. Complete simulation results for several selected cases to analyze the electromagnetic field under quasi-stationary conditions in a multiconductor system are reported and discussed in detail, and the main results are summarized. It was found that the parallel connection of conductors can amplify or reduce magnetic field amplitude with respect to the single conductor case and that this effect depends on the harmonics order View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

The scope of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRY APPLICATIONS includes all scope items of the IEEE Industry Applications Society, that is, the advancement of the theory and practice of electrical and electronic engineering in the development, design, manufacture, and application of electrical systems, apparatus, devices, and controls to the processes and equipment of industry and commerce; the promotion of safe, reliable, and economic installations; industry leadership in energy conservation and environmental, health, and safety issues; the creation of voluntary engineering standards and recommended practices; and the professional development of its membership.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Carlton E. Speck