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Personal Communications, IEEE

Issue 4 • Date Aug 2000

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • Evaluation of CRTP performance over cellular radio links

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 20 - 25
    Cited by:  Papers (15)  |  Patents (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1084 KB)  

    To make mobile IP telephony over cellular radio systems an economically viable alternative to circuit-switched voice, it is an absolute requirement that the 40-octet IP/UDP/RTP headers on IP telephony packets be reduced in size to conserve bandwidth and radio spectrum. We evaluate the performance of the default header compression scheme for IP/UDP/RTP, CRTP (RFC-2508), over links built on cellular radio access technology. We find that CRTP does not perform adequately over such links, and suggest that a more robust header compression scheme must be developed to make IP telephony over cellular economically viable View full abstract»

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  • Mobile IP joins forces with AAA

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 59 - 61
    Cited by:  Papers (18)  |  Patents (15)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (396 KB)  

    We present a set of requirements for a new security architecture for mobile IP, organized according to a progressively more detailed model of operation. The first requirements follow from the natural model for operation used in today's Internet, with special attention focused on the kinds of existing security associations that have evolved over the last few years. From this model, additional needs can be associated with the need for machine configuration and, in particular the dynamic allocation of an IP home address for a mobile client that wishes to use mobile IP. From the requirements and the natural trust model, a message flow has been engineered. With the proposals currently under consideration in the IETF a mobile node becomes truly able to roam throughout the Internet, while on the other hand needing substantially less administrative attention. It only needs a password and an NAI to formulate its global passport. If the existing Internet becomes integrated with telephone and mobile cellular infrastructures, Mobile IP may lead the way to economical communications anywhere in the world. The interaction between mobile IP entities and accounting, authentication, and authorization (AAA) services supplies the missing piece to enable operators to make a business case for offering mobile IP wireless data to their customers View full abstract»

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  • An Internet infrastructure for cellular CDMA networks using mobile IP

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 26 - 32
    Cited by:  Papers (12)  |  Patents (11)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1112 KB)  

    The CDMA community, under the umbrella of the 3rd Generation Partnership Project 2, has embarked on a standardization effort for wireless data based on mobile IP. Important issues addressed include the link layer interface to a mobile IP foreign agent; how link-layer mobility interacts with IP-layer mobility; how virtual private network services will be supported; and how to provide authentication, authorization, and accounting in a cellular mobile IP environment. Members of 3GPP2 are also active in the Internet Engineering Task Force's mobile IP, ROAMOPS, and AAA working groups. Based on our experiences in this effort, this article gives an overview of the issues we have encountered in standardizing a mobile IP-based network architecture in a cellular telephony environment, including current points of contention, and gives a summary of the current state of the standards View full abstract»

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  • ICEBERG: an Internet core network architecture for integrated communications

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 10 - 19
    Cited by:  Papers (40)  |  Patents (13)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1480 KB)  

    In the ICEBERG project at UC Berkeley, we are developing an Internet-based integration of telephony and data services spanning diverse access networks. Our primary goals are extensibility, scalability, robustness, and personalized communication. We leverage the Internet's low cost of entry for service creation, provision, deployment, and integration. We present our solutions to signaling, easy service creation, resource reservation, admission control, billing, and security in the ICEBERG network architecture View full abstract»

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  • Design, implementation, and evaluation of cellular IP

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 42 - 49
    Cited by:  Papers (168)  |  Patents (19)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1160 KB)  

    Wireless access to Internet services will become typical, rather than the exception as it is today. Such a vision presents great demands on mobile networks. Mobile IP represents a simple and scalable global mobility solution but lacks the support for fast handoff control and paging found in cellular telephony networks. In contrast, second- and third-generation cellular systems offer seamless mobility support but are built on complex and costly connection-oriented networking infrastructure that lacks the inherent flexibility, robustness, and scalability found in IP networks. In this article we present cellular IP, a micro-mobility protocol that provides seamless mobility support in limited geographical areas. Cellular IP, which incorporates a number of important cellular system design principles such as paging in support of passive connectivity, is built on a foundation of IP forwarding, minimal signaling, and soft-state location management. We discuss the design, implementation, and evaluation of a cellular IP testbed developed at Columbia University over the past several years. Built on a simple, low-cost, plug-and-play systems paradigm, cellular IP software enables the construction of arbitrary-sized access networks scaling from picocellular to metropolitan area networks View full abstract»

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  • IP-based access network infrastructure for next-generation wireless data networks

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 34 - 41
    Cited by:  Papers (44)  |  Patents (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1384 KB)  

    Next-generation wireless network standards are currently being defined. The access network architectures have several specialized components tailored for their respective wireless link technologies, even though the services provided by these different wireless networks are fairly similar. We propose a homogeneous IP-based network as a common access network for the different wireless technologies. The IP-based access network uses the Internet standard, Mobile IP, to support macro-mobility of mobile hosts, and HAWAII to support micro-mobility and paging functionality of current wireless networks. We also illustrate how the proposed IP-based solution can interwork with existing infrastructure so that deployment can be incremental View full abstract»

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  • IP-based mobile telecommunications networks

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 8 - 9
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (248 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
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  • The 3GPP and 3GPP2 movements toward an all-IP mobile network

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 62 - 64
    Cited by:  Papers (14)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (532 KB)  

    Today's wireless core network is based on a circuit-switched SS7 architecture similar to that found in wireline telecommunications networks. With the advent of IP technologies and the tremendous growth in data traffic, the wireless industry is evolving its core networks toward IP technology. Wireless telecommunications started as an offshoot of wireline telephony, and the absence of global standards resulted in regional standardization. Two major mobile telecommunications standards have dominated the global wireless market, namely, TDMA/CDMA developed by the TIA in North America and GSM developed by the ETSI in Europe. As we move toward third-generation wireless, there is a need to develop standards which are more global and collaborative. The global wireless industry has created two new global partnership projects, SGPP and 3GPP2, to address the issue of the limited data capabilities of 2G systems, motivating the partnership projects (PPs) to start work on 3G wideband radio technologies that can provide higher data rates. This work resulted in 3G wireless radio technologies that will provide data rates of 144 kb/s for vehicular, 384 kb/s for pedestrian, and 2 Mb/s for indoor environments, and meet the ITU IMT-2000 requirements. Now that the radio technology standards to support higher data rates have been developed, the PPs are focusing on development of standards for all-IP networks. We discuss the genesis of 3GPP and 3GPP2 IP work, outlining the important architectural differences of the two groups. Currently, 3GPP and 3GPP2 offer divergent proposals that need to be harmonized if convergence toward an IP-based mobile telecommunications networks is to become a reality View full abstract»

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  • TeleMIP: telecommunications-enhanced mobile IP architecture for fast intradomain mobility

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 50 - 58
    Cited by:  Papers (65)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1720 KB)  

    This article first surveys existing protocols for supporting IP mobility and then proposes an extension to the mobile IP architecture, called TeleMIP. Our architecture attempts to achieve smaller handoff latency by localizing the scope of most location update messages within an administrative domain or a geographical region. TeleMIP is intended for use in evolving third-generation wireless networks, and introduces a new logical entity, called the mobility agent, which provides a mobile node with a stable point of attachment in a foreign network. While the MA is functionally similar to conventional foreign agents, it is located at a higher level in the network hierarchy than the subnet-specific FAs. Location updates for intradomain mobility are localized only up to the MA; transmission of global location updates are necessary only when the mobile changes administrative domains and/or geographical regions. By permitting the use of private or locally scoped addresses for handling intradomain mobility, TeleMIP allows efficient use of public address space. Also, by reducing the frequency of global update messages, our architecture overcomes several drawbacks of existing protocols, such as large latencies in location updates, higher likelihood of loss of binding update messages, and loss of inflight packets, and thus provides better mobility support for real-time services and applications. The dynamic creation of mobility agents (in TeleMLP) permits the use of load balancing schemes for the efficient management of network resources View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

This Magazine ceased publication in 2001. The current retitled publication is IEEE Wireless Communications.

Full Aims & Scope