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Engineering Management, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date May 2000

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Displaying Results 1 - 14 of 14
  • About this issue

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 161 - 162
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The rise and fall of strategic planning [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 281 - 282
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Economic models of technological change [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 282 - 283
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The growth warriors: Creating sustainable global advantage for America's technology industriesb [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 283 - 284
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Knowledge management in new product teams: practices and outcomes

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 221 - 231
    Cited by:  Papers (58)
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    This paper explores the critical practices impacting a new product team's ability to learn and succeed. By investigating the practices of 281 new product teams from around the world, several factors emerged that impact a team's ability to acquire and use knowledge to reduce cycle time and improve their probability of success. The significant factors include: (1) documentation of project information, (2) storage and retrieval systems for project information, (3) information reviewing practices, (4) vision clarity, (5) vision stability, and (6) management support of the project View full abstract»

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  • Performance and time to market: accelerating cycle time with overlapping stages

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 232 - 244
    Cited by:  Papers (37)
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    Windows of opportunity and product life cycles have been shortening, placing pressure on firms to stay competitive. Many firms have responded to this pressure by setting goals of reducing new product development (NPD) cycle time and/or improving product performance, often by setting up fuzzy gates between stages, cross-functional teams, or both. This study examines the tradeoff between product performance and time to market, focusing on the effect of overlapping stages during which marketing, design, and manufacturing engineering are jointly working on performance improvement, An NPD process model comprising a design stage, a process stage, and an intermediary overlap stage representing the interaction between design and process personnel is developed. Key findings include the following. (1) Overlapping stages reduces time to market, but the marginal returns to lengthening the overlap stage yield progressively smaller improvements in time to market. (2) The longer the market window is open, the less is the pressure to rush the product to market, and product performance can be further improved by leaving the product longer in development. (3) It is better to keep the product longer in development rather than accelerate time to market if the base product performance is low. (4) If the productivity of the overlap stage is increased, it is more profitable to keep the product in development longer and boost product performance at launch than to rush the product to market quicker. (5) The greater the market power the firm possesses, the faster it should bring the product to market, as long as product performance and sustainability of market power are not substantially reduced. A set of propositions is derived from the model, and is tested in a small-scale empirical study on firms in the automobile and automotive supply industry. The results are largely supportive of the propositions. Management implications and recommendations for further research are presented View full abstract»

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  • Inventors are not alike: the distribution of patenting output among industrial R&D personnel

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 184 - 199
    Cited by:  Papers (25)
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    From theoretical work, as well as from empirical findings on the distribution of scientific performance, we can deduce that there are also great variations in the output of industrial research and development personnel. By analyzing the patenting output from research and development personnel, we are able to measure their technological performance. The inventor portfolio provides a method to measure and identify key inventors. Key inventors are characterized by a large number of patent applications which are of high quality. This paper presents the results from an empirical study that analyzes the distribution of the patenting output of inventors working in the chemical, electrical, and mechanical engineering industry in 43 German companies. The findings of this study suggest that the technological performance of inventors defined by the number and quality of filed patents is highly concentrated. In particular, a very small group of key inventors is responsible for the major part of the company's technological performance, and thus for the company's competitiveness. These findings, in turn, have major practical implications for human resource management in industrial R&D departments View full abstract»

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  • Technology competition policies and the semiconductor industries of Japan and the United States: a fifty-year retrospective

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 200 - 210
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
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    The dramatic changes in the fates of firms and industries involved in the production of semiconductors in the United States and Japan over the past half century have led to a large literature addressing or at least posing a number of questions. Did technology import policies, protectionism, support of research consortia, and the use of other industrial policies help or hurt the development of the Japanese industry? What were the consequences of the apparent technological discontinuities represented by the replacement of vacuum tubes by transistors, of germanium transistors by silicon transistors, of discrete transistors by integrated circuits? Have differences in industrial structure between the United States and Japan had consequences for competitiveness? This paper reviews this literature, and applies hindsight in revisiting these questions View full abstract»

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  • Understanding relationships among teleworkers' e-mail usage, e-mail richness perceptions, and e-mail productivity perceptions under a software engineering environment

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 163 - 173
    Cited by:  Papers (11)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (184 KB)  

    This study was undertaken to investigate the use of e-mail and its implications under a telework environment for distributed software engineering. For this, the relative strength between a social influence and individual attributes in affecting teleworkers' e-mail use was studied. Management support was used as the representative social influence, and age, status, and ease of use represented individual attributes. An examination was also made on how e-mail use, individual attributes, and management support affected the perceptions of e-mail's information richness and e-mail productivity. Two different types of surveys, log sheets and perception-based self-reports, as well as interviews and e-mail correspondences composed the data sources. Three hierarchical regression models were defined and tested for the hypothesis validation. Data analysis indicated that management support was a much more powerful indicator for teleworkers' media use than individual characteristics. Furthermore, although labeled as a relatively lean medium from the media richness theory perspective, e-mail could become an effective and richer communication tool through an active social construction process of management support. Finally, the management support and perception of e-mail as a rich medium were both highly influential in creating teleworkers' positive perception on e-mail productivity. This study rendered a strong indication that effective adoption of e-mail by teleworkers as an information-rich medium could benefit distributed work and distributed organizations through enhanced work productivity View full abstract»

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  • Software development and new product development: potentials for cross-domain knowledge sharing

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 211 - 220
    Cited by:  Papers (17)
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    Software development (SD) and new product development (NPD) share several similarities. However, scholars in the two fields have generally focused on different aspects of “development.” Specifically, the SD literature emphasizes development methodologies, techniques, and process metrics, while the NPD studies typically focus on organizational factors like teamwork, cross-functional integration, internal/external communication in teams, performance, processes, and project leadership. Further, there has been a limited exchange of ideas and research findings between the two domains. This paper establishes the potential for SD and NPD to learn from each other by addressing several important product development challenges. Specifically, we demonstrate this potential by deriving significant cross-domain lessons in three areas, namely, teamwork management, development process maturity, and development process acceleration View full abstract»

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  • Utilizing cluster analysis to structure concurrent engineering teams

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 269 - 280
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
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    The problem of structuring a concurrent engineering team was studied. This research considered various mathematical clustering approaches to group product development design tasks together, and then constructed cross-functional teams based on the task clusters formed from each approach, Resultant team structures were evaluated against each other, and against a traditional discipline-centered hierarchical structure. The goal of this effort was to develop a structuring methodology for concurrent engineering teams that would allow projects to be completed faster, and with a lower risk of project failure. Team structures were developed using alternative clustering techniques and different combinations of data as inputs into the clustering techniques. Clustering approaches included single linkage, complete linkage, average linkage, the centroid method, and Ward's method. Data sources were from the initial stages of product development, and included task risk levels, task precedence relationships, disciplines required, personnel available, task technical importance, task difficulty, task priority, component requirement interactions, and projected communication levels between design tasks. Additional analysis was done on the effects of multiteam assignments for critical personnel. Team structures developed using the average linkage clustering approach and a data set composed of projected communication levels between tasks and discipline requirements for each design task were found to support the development of shorter duration projects with lower risk levels View full abstract»

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  • Managing multiple engineering projects in a manufacturing support environment

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 258 - 268
    Cited by:  Papers (24)
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    Business trends require front-line managers to integrate multiproject concepts with those of traditional single-project management since very rarely can one find major organizations managing just one project. A typical situation entails a limited pool of resources which is applied to the management of several projects, with people moving back and forth among different assignments in different projects. Yet, few studies on project management have started to explore the issue of how to manage an organization with multiple inter- or intradepartmental projects. Using a case study method, our exploratory research investigates the specific problems associated with the management of multiple engineering projects in a manufacturing support environment, with the intent to identify common factors of success. Knowing the factors of success is but the first step toward improving multi-project management. Our findings provide insight into how the most important multiple-project success factors in this environment differ from factors of success in traditional single-project management, and are consistent with other emerging research in product development environments. The differences center on resource allocation and flexibility. Some factors, such as ownership, staff experience, and communication, take on additional dimensions when considered in a multiple-versus a single-project environment. Division and assignment of resources, prioritization, and customized management style, which have little relevance in relation to single projects, are shown to play a major role in the success of multiproject management View full abstract»

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  • Innovative capabilities of a firm and the use of technical alliances

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 174 - 183
    Cited by:  Papers (33)
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    Relationships between types of innovative capabilities of firms, the amount and nature of technical alliance usage, and the extent and types of problems associated with those alliances are explored with firms in the semiconductor industry. Results show that, although firms need radical and/or incremental product and process innovation capabilities to compete successfully, they are likely to have core capabilities which are either product focused or process focused. Firms can reconcile radical and incremental R&D cultures, but find it more difficult to bridge the product-versus-process divide. Firms with strong capabilities are found to engage in more technical alliances. This is particularly true of firms with radical innovation capabilities. The study also finds that firms engage in technical alliances more often to supplement rather than complement their capabilities. Firms experience more problems in acquiring product innovation capabilities through alliances meant for new technology development than they do in acquiring process innovation capabilities View full abstract»

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  • The development of knowledge embeddedness in CASE technologies within organizations

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 245 - 257
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (192 KB)  

    Computer-aided software engineering (CASE) has become an important part of the information technology landscape and software development activities. While researchers have examined the productivity gains associated with CASE, relatively little attention has been accorded to one of the critical elements of CASE: the repository. The CASE repository is considered to be the cornerstone of CASE technology platforms. Therefore, any plan for CASE tool implementation must include a plan for building and managing the repository. Yet, significant challenges are encountered in efforts to fashion the CASE repository as an active source of relevant systems development knowledge in organizations. This study investigates the influence of factors that are believed to facilitate knowledge embeddedness within the CASE repository. Knowledge embeddedness refers to the extent to which relevant systems development knowledge in an organization has been codified and stored within the CASE repository. Data drawn from 176 firms employing CASE environments are used to investigate the relative influence of these factors. The results indicate that management support, methodology influence, time since adoption, and external knowledge links enable success in knowledge embeddedness View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

Management of technical functions such as research, development, and engineering in industry, government, university, and other settings. Emphasis is on studies carried on within an organization to help in decision making or policy formation for RD&E. 

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Rajiv Sabherwal
Sam M. Walton College of Business, University of Arkansas