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Computer

Issue 6 • Date June 2000

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Displaying Results 1 - 13 of 13
  • Are too many programmers too narrowly trained

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 12 - 15
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  • An overview of the Real-Time CORBA specification

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 56 - 63
    Cited by:  Papers (75)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (265 KB)  

    A growing class of real-time systems require end-to-end support for various quality-of-service (QoS) aspects, including bandwidth, latency, jitter and dependability. Applications include command and control, manufacturing process control, videoconferencing, large-scale distributed interactive simulation, and testbeam data acquisition. These systems require support for stringent QoS requirements. To meet this challenge, developers are turning to distributed object computing middleware, such as the Common Object Request Broker Architecture, an Object Management Group (OMG) industry standard. In complex real-time systems, DOC middleware resides between applications and the underlying operating systems, protocol stacks and hardware. CORBA helps decrease the cycle time and effort required to develop high-quality systems by composing applications using reusable software component services rather than building them entirely from scratch. The Real-Time CORBA specification includes features to manage CPU, network and memory resources. The authors describe the key Real-Time CORBA features that they feel are the most relevant to researchers and developers of distributed real-time and embedded systems. View full abstract»

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  • A generic framework for modeling resources with UML

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 64 - 69
    Cited by:  Papers (22)  |  Patents (20)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (304 KB)  

    Current wisdom encourages designers to first focus on the logical aspects of their problem and then defer platform and technology issues until the concluding phases of development. This behavior is reasonable, considering that devising logically sound solutions is frequently the most difficult aspect of development. Unfortunately-and this has been understated to date-there are many situations in which this approach is inappropriate. Real-time software design is one domain where this situation is particularly obvious because the domain's requirements force software to interact with the physical world in some way. Recently, a generic object oriented framework has been proposed for modeling both physical and logical resources. Although the framework is generic, it is mainly used with the industry-standard Unified Modeling Language (UML). By providing a standard means for representing resources and their attributes, it becomes possible to seamlessly transfer UML models of real-time systems between design and specialized analysis tools. The author shows how developers can use the OMG's UML to model resources and thus predict crucial system properties before fully implementing a system View full abstract»

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  • The empire strikes back... with the x-box

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 104 - 106
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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  • Alive and well: Jini technology today

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 107 - 109
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (116 KB)  

    The Jini community is an ongoing experiment in trying to mix open source development techniques with industrial engineering development. The Jini technology is an approach to distributed systems that uses several Java properties. In particular, the Jini environment makes heavy use of Java's ability to move objects, including each object's data and code, from one Java environment to another. The Java environment, with its portable bytecodes, dynamic loading, code verification, and security allows such an approach straightforwardly. The author discusses its core services, discovery protocol, device connection and system enhancement View full abstract»

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  • Distributed net applications create virtual supercomputers

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 16 - 20
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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  • The end of research as we know it?

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 112
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  • Components: what if they gave a revolution and nobody came?

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 28 - 34
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
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    There have been three great revolutions in computing technology during the past 50 years: the stored-program computer, high-level languages and component-level programming. Although working programmers are well aware of this last revolution, it seems to have escaped the notice of most everyone else. The author feels that academic researchers are doing little or nothing that touches the subject and apart from trade journals and magazines aimed at developers that publishers have all but ignored it. The component-level programming revolution has already happened in the academic community and in the authors opinion, nobody came. The author starts by giving a brief history of components, detailing the controls (tools that allow developers to create visually pleasing dialog boxes by drawing such devices as buttons), visual innovations and the data control of Visual Basic. The author moves on to current component technology. He explains ActiveX and other recent technological developments (like dynamic instantiation and universal standard). He finishes by looking into the future of component technology, explaining semipersistence and marketing flexibility and solutions to transmitting problems View full abstract»

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  • Winning teams: performance engineering during development

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 36 - 44
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    In 1995 Raytheon Systems initiated a program to develop a DSP-based array processor that would be used to process large amount of raw data from a sensor subsystem. However, because the next generation target processor had not yet been released the software development team had to complete a significant amount of the system and software development prior to the availability of the actual hardware. To foster strong algorithmic performance and efficient implementation in this high-risk development environment, they incorporated software performance engineering into their design methods. Loosely defined software engineering is a set of techniques designed to gather data, construct a system performance model, manage the risk of uncertainty, evaluate alternatives and verify the models and results. The author explains his experience on this project detailing the areas of SPE that were used throughout the life cycle of this software development program: execution modeling, input modeling, gathering of performance data, tools, design principles and software engineering View full abstract»

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  • APIs for real-time distributed object programming

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 72 - 80
    Cited by:  Papers (46)  |  Patents (5)
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    Ideally, according to the author, a real-time distributed programming method should be based on a general high-level style that could be easily accommodated by application programmers using C++ and Java. If such a method were to exist, these programmers could specify the interactions among distributed components and the timing requirements of various actions without expending much effort. Facilitating high-level, high precision, real-time object programming by establishing some form of language tools has consequently become a subject of great interest to the embedded systems community. This article focuses on application programming interfaces (APIs) that take the form of C++ and Java class libraries and support high-level, high precision, real-time object programming without requiring new language translators. These APIs wrap the services of the real-time object execution engines, which consist of hardware, node OSs, and middleware; they enable convenient high-level programming almost to the extent that a new real-time object language can. The author explains the API's fundamental features, how they interact among real-time objects, and how multicast channels and real-time multicast APIs contribute View full abstract»

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  • Recent advances in wireless networking

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 100 - 103
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (296 KB)  

    After discussing advances in wired networking in a previous column (see ibid., p.107-9, April 2000), I now turn to advances in wireless networking. Wireless networks can include everything from cellular, personal communications system (PCS), and Group System for Mobile communications (GSM) networks to wireless LANs, satellite-based networks, and fixed wireless networks. Many of these technologies have experienced significant growth lately because of an increasingly mobile workforce and accelerating user acceptance View full abstract»

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  • The real-time specification for Java

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 47 - 54
    Cited by:  Papers (54)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (292 KB)  

    New languages, programming disciplines, operating systems, and software engineering techniques sometimes hold considerable potential for real-time software developers. A promising area of interest-but one fairly new to the real-time community-is object-oriented programming. Java, for example, draws heavily from object orientation and is highly suitable for extension to real-time and embedded systems. Recognizing this fit between Java and real-time software development, the Real-Time for Java Experts Group (RTJEG) began developing the real-time specification for Java (RTSJ) in March 1999 under the Java Community Process. This article explains RTSJ's features and the thinking behind the specification's design. The goal of the RTJEG, of which the authors are both members, was to provide a platform-a Java execution environment and application program interface (API)-that lets programmers correctly reason about the temporal behavior of executing software View full abstract»

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  • Real-time distributed object computing: an emerging field

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 45 - 46
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    While the field of object-oriented real-time computing (ORC) is young, it is growing quickly because it offers such a wide range of applicability, from complex real-time systems to the next generation of computing and communication devices. The paper presents significant advances in both the art and science of ORC technology View full abstract»

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Ron Vetter
University of North Carolina
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