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Instrumentation & Measurement Magazine, IEEE

Issue 2 • Date June 2000

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Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
  • Forgotten beginnings

    Page(s): 53
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (87 KB)  

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  • The student edition of Minitab for Windows 95 and Windows NT: Release 12 [Book Review]

    Page(s): 60
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Grounding and shielding. I. Noise

    Page(s): 41 - 44
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    Noise affects most devices. Designing adequate shielding does not have to be a black art-in fact, it should not be. Some basic understanding and the application of appropriate principles will eliminate most problems. This article is the first of a four-part series that covers the basics of noise, grounding, and shielding. This article describes various mechanisms of noise-understanding them will give immediate insight into avoiding noise problems View full abstract»

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  • Rapid development for medical products

    Page(s): 32 - 37
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    In today's world, intense international competition, rapidly changing technologies, fragmented and demanding markets, and increasing product complexity, force fast development for all high-technology products. The manufacturers of high-technology products have responded to these pressures, and doubling of development speed is commonplace. Even with the reductions in time-to-market attained thus far, product development speed can be much faster (and companies will do it). Success demands a new organizational mindset and new product development methods. Development speed will intensify in the future for all high-technology products, including medical devices. Companies must continually seek to improve the speed of their product development or be swept aside by their fleet-footed competitors View full abstract»

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  • Guesstimating firmware performance

    Page(s): 24 - 27
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    Abstraction conses af a price. In too many cases we're losing the “feel” of the problem. The flip side of a “feel” for a problem is an ability to combine that feeling with basic arithmetic skills to very quickly create a first approximation to a solution, something often called “guesstimating.” This word combines guess-based on our engineering feel for a problem-and estimate-a partial analytical solution View full abstract»

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  • Arbitrary polynomial transformations

    Page(s): 38 - 40
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    Previously, we looked at several polynomial transformations-the classical lowpass-to-highpass, lowpass-to-bandpass, and lowpass-to-bandstop transformations, and the special case of the bilinear transformation. We presented specific algorithms for accomplishing the transformations numerically. In this article, we end our preoccupation with polynomial transformations by presenting a straightforward algorithm derived from Heinen and Siddique [1988] for performing arbitrary polynomial transformations numerically, and, which is, in fact, based on Waggener's method [1980]. However, we do not implement Heinen and Siddique's algorithm directly. Instead, we rely on functions written to find sum-polynomials and product-polynomials. Our approach is quite as efficient, but it should prove easier to follow and code View full abstract»

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  • The deal-killer entrepreneurial personality

    Page(s): 22 - 23
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    After years participating in successful and struggling ventures, I have observed a curious, but fairly consistent pattern concerning personality traits of entrepreneurs. Some of these personality traits can put to death a new venture. Certainly these traits can stunt the promised growth of an enterprise. Paradoxically, the very traits that tend to move a person toward the realm of entrepreneur can be the same traits that may artificially dissolve a company. I use “artificially” here because these may be the only issues that are within the total control of the new venture. All other threats tend to be outside the venture, and thus, outside its control View full abstract»

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  • Chaos at 35,000 feet

    Page(s): 18 - 21
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    The author discusses his experience in gaining investment and starting up a company to develop an improved defibrillation technique. He outlines his frustrations and daily hassles, and tells how an incident of airline passenger cardiac failure strengthened his resolve to continue. The company set up, Control Dynamics, although small, is functional. Over the last several years, many contracts have been won to develop chaos-control technology. Patent applications for chaos-based devices have been successful, and now we are intensely working toward practical applications of our research View full abstract»

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  • Making sense of the moon illusion

    Page(s): 51 - 52
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  • Embedded and real-time Java

    Page(s): 49 - 50
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    Embedded and real-time system design are properly separate concerns. Many embedded systems lack strict timeliness requirements, while many real-time systems (e.g., telephone central office switches) are not embedded. However, a number of embedded systems do have real-time requirements, including a number of products that fall under the I&M umbrella. The author addresses both real-time and embedded Java initiatives View full abstract»

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  • Grounding and shielding. II. Grounding and return

    Page(s): 45 - 48
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    Shielding for noise has several possible configurations, with grounding as one of the concerns in designing an effective shield. Unfortunately, some people think that picking a ground connection is the panacea for their noise problems. The author attempts to dispel that notion by illustrating some principles for grounding and return configurations View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Instrumentation and Measurement Magazine contains applications-oriented and tutorial articles on topics in the broadly based areas of instrumentation system design and measurement techniques.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Prof. Wendy Van Moer

wendy.w.vanmoer@ieee.org
IandMMagazineEIC@ieee.org