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Selected Areas in Communications, IEEE Journal on

Issue 5 • Date May 2000

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Displaying Results 1 - 15 of 15
  • Guest editorial recent advances in network management and operations

    Page(s): 641 - 643
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Using distributed object technologies in telecommunications network management

    Page(s): 644 - 653
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    The Telecommunications Management Network (TMN) has been developed as the framework to support administrations in managing telecommunications networks. It suggests the use of OSI Systems Management (OSI-SM) as the technology for management information exchanges. Distributed object technologies, such as the Common Object Request Broker architecture (CORBA), address the use of software application program interfaces (APIs) in addition to interoperable protocols. Their use in TMN has been the subject of intensive research in previous years, with most approaches focusing on interoperability aspects with OSI-SM. We examine the issues behind using distributed object technologies in TMN via a native fashion, with network elements supporting distributed objects directly, e.g., a "CORBA to the switch" approach. The proposed solution tries to maintain the full OSI-SM expressive power in a way that other solutions have not attempted before. Performance and scalability issues are considered, while the approach has been validated through implementation. View full abstract»

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  • Managing the network state evolution over time using CORBA environment

    Page(s): 654 - 663
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    This paper proposes a CORBA-based framework for managing the network state evolution over time. This framework is based on the concept of CORBA temporal agents, capable of managing the past and current behavior of network resources. Managed objects use specific time attributes for representing how their values are evolving in time. Moreover, specially designed operations (services) enable users to exploit the temporal dimension of management information in order to understand the past, control the present, and thus even predict the future of managed objects. The management environment is designed in order to provide coexistence and interoperability with existing management platforms. View full abstract»

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  • J/sup TMN/: a Java-based TMN development and experimentation environment

    Page(s): 664 - 675
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    Java technology has largely entered the world of element, network, and service management and has undoubtedly proven useful in combination with the SNMP framework for both manager and agent side developments. However, very few experiments have been made so far trying to provide an in-depth integration of this technology within the TMN framework. In this paper we present a free software which offers a generic environment which provides a basis for reaching this integration. This environment, called J/sup TMN/, is composed of a set of Java software packages which enable both development and deployment of TMN compliant components. Not bound to any specific management platform and easily portable to any TMN system, its goal is to allow experimentation and deployment of more advanced features such as mobile agents, active network management, and advanced delegation in harmony with existing TMN approaches. View full abstract»

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  • An integrated management environment for network resources and services

    Page(s): 676 - 685
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    Technological and human factors have contributed to increase the complexity of the network management problem. Heterogeneity and globalization of network resources, on one hand, have increased user expectations for flexible and easy-to-use environments; on the other hand, they have suggested entirely novel ways to face the management problem. Several research efforts recognize the need for integrated solutions to manage both network resources and services in open, global, and untrusted environments. In addition, these solutions should permit the coexistence of different management models and should interoperate with legacy systems. In the paper, we define a general architecture based on a distributed processing environment (DFE) that offers a large set of facilities to the application level. We have developed the MESIS management environment shaped after the above architecture and its DPE facilities with mobile agents technology. MESIS handles, in a uniform way, both resources and services, and focuses on two crucial properties: interoperability to overcome heterogeneity, and security to grant users safe and protected operations. The Agent Interoperability Facility supports compliance with CORBA-based management systems and with MASIF agent platforms. The Agent Security Facility provides authentication, integrity, privacy, authorization, and secure interoperation with CORBA systems. View full abstract»

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  • Using service models for management of Internet services

    Page(s): 686 - 701
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    As Internet services grow in complexity, Internet Service Providers (ISPs) are finding out that the ad hoc methods that they have employed thus far to monitor and diagnose their services are not sufficient to provide acceptable service quality to their subscribers. In this paper, we demonstrate how service models can he used by ISPs to effectively manage their service offerings. A service model encapsulates a human expert's knowledge of a service, its components, and its interdependencies with other services. In addition, using ongoing measurements, a service model tracks the health of the different services and their components. By traversing a service model top-down, an operator can not only assess the overall health of a service, but also easily correlate the health of all the services and service components to determine the root cause of any problems that may occur. By minimizing the time and effort needed to diagnose problems, service models enable ISP operators to efficiently resolve problems that occur in an ISP environment. Since each ISP system is unique in many respects, unique service models have to be crafted for each of the services in every ISP system. Handcrafting customized service models requires enormous effort and time on the part of a human expert, a luxury that few ISPs can afford. In this paper, we describe a methodology for constructing customized service models for a target ISP system with minimal human intervention. This methodology relies on a service model creation engine that composes a custom service model for an ISP system using a predefined service model template specification and automatically discovered information about the target ISP system. We describe a prototype implementation of this methodology and present an example of a service model obtained from a real-world ISP system. The concepts described are applicable for the management of networks and services in enterprise systems as well. View full abstract»

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  • Building distributed management applications with the IETF Script MIB

    Page(s): 702 - 714
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    Scalable and efficient management of today's fast growing networks requires distributed management systems. This paper introduces a classification of distributed management systems, followed by an overview of technologies for building such systems. One technology, the IETF Script MIB, is discussed in detail, including an implementation architecture and performance studies. Finally, application scenarios are presented, demonstrating how distributed management applications can be built by means of the IETF Script MIB. View full abstract»

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  • Applying a 3-D-GUI to a distributed network management system

    Page(s): 715 - 722
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    Three-dimensional (3-D) GUIs help network operators to understand complicated network configurations. With the goal of applying 3-D-GUI technology to CORBA-based network management systems, this paper proposes a method of integrating VRML/Java/CORBA, in which Java applets mediate management information between a VRML scene and a CORBA server. A prototype system configuration that incorporates this method and its operation sequence, which displays the fault notifications on VRML scenes, is described. An evaluation of the prototype system demonstrates the effectiveness of this method. View full abstract»

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  • Toward efficient monitoring

    Page(s): 723 - 732
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    In many cases, data networks need to be monitored to ensure that they stay within acceptable parameters. The monitoring consists of measuring properties of the network, and of inferring an aggregate predicate from these measurements. In many cases it is too complex, or too expensive, to conduct explicit monitoring at all times. In these cases, information (integrity constraints) on the evolution of the network status can often allow us to use past measurements to infer the future behavior, thus reducing the monitoring cost. We provide a formal description of the problem of monitoring rapidly changing data, which we call the monitoring problem. We then classify this problem in terms of the integrity constraints that govern the evolution of the environment, and propose different algorithms for each of these classes. For the most restricted case, we can find a greedy algorithm which is optimal, while for the more general cases, we use competitive analysis and show that optimal worst and average case cost measuring algorithms exist. We then present heuristics for low-cost low-complexity measuring algorithms. We believe that the results of this paper can serve as a framework for further studies. View full abstract»

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  • Large-scale fault isolation

    Page(s): 733 - 743
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    Of the many distributed applications designed for the Internet, the successful ones are those that have paid careful attention to scale and robustness. These applications share several design principles. In this paper, we illustrate the application of these principles to common network monitoring tasks. Specifically, we describe and evaluate 1) a robust distributed topology discovery mechanism and 2) a mechanism for scalable fault isolation in multicast distribution trees. Our mechanisms reveal a different design methodology for network monitoring-one that carefully trades off monitoring fidelity (where necessary) for more graceful degradation in the presence of different kinds of network dynamics. View full abstract»

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  • Adaptive and automated detection of service anomalies in transaction-oriented WANs: network analysis, algorithms, implementation, and deployment

    Page(s): 744 - 757
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    Algorithms and software for proactive and adaptive detection of network/service anomalies (i.e., performance degradations) have been developed, implemented, deployed, and field-tested for transaction-oriented wide area networks (WANs). A real-time anomaly detection system called TRISTAN (transaction instantaneous anomaly notification) has been implemented, and is deployed in the commercially important AT&T transaction access services (TAS) network. TAS is a high volume, multiple service classes, hybrid telecom and data WAN that services transaction traffic in the U.S. and neighboring countries. TRISTAN adaptively and preactively detects network/service performance anomalies in multiple-service-class-based and transaction-oriented networks, where performances of service classes are mutually dependent and correlated, where environmental factors (e.g., nonmanaged or nonmonitored equipment within customer premises) can strongly impact network and service performances. Specifically, TRISTAN implements algorithms that: 1) sample and convert raw transaction records to service-class based performance data in which potential network anomalies are highlighted; 2) automatically construct adaptive and service-class-based performance thresholds from historical transaction records for detecting network and service anomalies; and 3) perform real-time network/service anomaly detection. TRISTAN is demonstrated to be capable of proactively detecting network/service anomalies, which easily elude detection by the traditional alarm-based network monitoring systems. View full abstract»

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  • NESTOR: an architecture for network self-management and organization

    Page(s): 758 - 766
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    Configuration management presently requires complex labor-intensive processes by experts. A single configuration task-installing/reconfiguring a system, or provisioning a service-typically involves a large number of activities fragmented among multiple network elements, each with its own proprietary configuration management instrumentation and tools. A change may cause configuration inconsistencies resulting in failures or inefficiencies; undoing changes to recover an operational state is often very difficult or even practically impossible. Therefore, configuration management is very costly, error prone, and often results in unpredictable failures and costly recovery. NESTOR seeks to replace labor-intensive configuration management with one that is automated and software-intensive. Configuration management is automated by policy scripts that access and manipulate respective network elements via a resource directory server (RDS). RDS provides a uniform object-relationship model of network resources and represents consistency in terms of constraints; it supports atomicity and recovery of configuration change transactions, and mechanisms to assure consistency through changes. RDS pushes configuration changes to network elements using a layer of adapters that translate operations on its object-relationship model to actions on respective elements. NESTOR has been implemented in two complementary versions and is now being applied to automate several configuration management scenarios of increasing complexity, with encouraging results. View full abstract»

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  • OAM MIB: an end-to-end performance management solution for ATM

    Page(s): 767 - 778
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    Current network management needs an end-to-end overview of various connections rather than the information that is purely local to the individual devices. The typical manager-centric polling approach, however, is not adequate to understand network-wide behavior of a large-scale broadband network. We propose a new management information base (MIB) approach, called operation, administration, and maintenance (OAM) MIB. The MIB provides a network manager with dynamic end-to-end management information by utilizing special standard ATM cells. The MIB makes end-to-end management feasible while it reduces management-related traffic and manager-to-manager interactions. In our model, a customer network management system accesses the MIB through M1/M2 reference points of the ATM Forum management architecture with simple network management protocol (SNMP). View full abstract»

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  • A highly efficient path-restoration protocol for management of optical network transport integrity

    Page(s): 779 - 794
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    Distributed path restoration based on optical cross-connects can provide highly capacity-efficient real-time restoration for WDM-based optical networking. However, to obtain an assured restoration level with the theoretically very low amounts of spare capacity that path restoration allows, one must solve, or closely approximate a solution to, the integer multicommodity maximum flow (MCMF) problem, MCMF is, however a hard combinatorial optimization problem due to what is called the "mutual capacity" aspects of the problem: which of many competing origin-destination pairs should be allowed paths over the finite spares on each span? Integer MCMF is further complicated by the nonunimodular nature of the problem, i.e., fractional flows are forbidden but would arise if solved by linear programming. This paper presents a heuristic principle that tests well against integer programming solutions of MCMF routing. The heuristic is first characterized in a centralized program, then adapted for use in a distributed path restoration protocol. In all test cases, the protocol obtains over 97% of the paths found in an optimal MCMF solution in the same network. Via OPNET simulation it is also predicted that the protocol will run in well under 2 seconds which means it could be used directly in real-time, or in distributed prefailure self-planning, for restoration. The significance is that network operators could aggressively optimize their spare capacity, toward theoretical minimums, while still assuring 100% restorability. View full abstract»

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  • Manageability of Java-based digital TV receivers

    Page(s): 795 - 805
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    The hardest problems of network management are frequently not modeling, abstracting, filtering, or propagation of management information; they are the extraction of management information from the resources being managed. This process is commonly referred to as the management instrumentation of resources. Although a variety of new systems are being designed and deployed on a continuous basis, it is still a rare occasion that these systems are designed and instrumented to be managed. We show how management instrumentation can be simply and powerfully accomplished if management provisions are made in the design of the managed resource. We look at digital television receivers and their Java applications as standardized by the Advanced Television Standards Committee (ATSC). We model the applications lifecycle of these applications using the ITU-T X.731 State Management function, and outline the corresponding applications and management Java APIs. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications focuses on all telecommunications, including telephone, telegraphy, facsimile, and point-to-point television, by electromagnetic propagation.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Muriel Médard
MIT