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MultiMedia, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date Jan-Mar 2000

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Displaying Results 1 - 10 of 10
  • Querying by photographs: a VR metaphor for image retrieval

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 52 - 59
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (520 KB)  

    Interaction paradigms based on 3D interfaces and virtual reality offer new possibilities to overcome the limitations of query by example. We present a system that lets users navigate a 3D world where they can take photographs to query a database of images by content. Furthermore, users can interactively customize the virtual world by adding objects to the scene and editing object properties such as colors and textures View full abstract»

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  • Video modeling using strata-based annotation

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 68 - 74
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (476 KB)  

    Our project on digital video modeling aims to achieve efficient browsing and retrieval. Video is not merely a huge collection of still images, it is a complex temporal medium capturing high-level semantic ideas. For almost a decade researchers have worked on developing efficient techniques to model, index, and retrieve digital video information. To support intuitive video access, the video data must be properly modeled and indexed based on its characteristics and contents. One such annotation-based model is the stratification model, which focuses on segmenting the video's contextual information into multiple layers or strata. Each stratum describes the temporal occurrences of a simple concept such as the appearance of an anchor person in a news video. It thus focuses on segmenting the contextual information into chunks rather than dividing physically contiguous frames into shots, as is traditionally done View full abstract»

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  • MPEG-4: a multimedia standard for the third millennium. 2

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 76 - 84
    Cited by:  Papers (11)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (552 KB)  

    MPEG-4 defines a multimedia system for interoperable communication of complex scenes containing audio, video, synthetic audio, and graphics material. In part 1 of this two-part article (Battista et al., 1999) we provided a comprehensive overview of the technical elements. In part 2 we describe an application scenario based on digital satellite television broadcasting, discuss the standard's envisaged evolution, and compare it to other activities in forums addressing multimedia specifications View full abstract»

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  • Multimedia computing and systems

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 18 - 21
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (56 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
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  • SeamlessDesign for 3D object creation

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 22 - 33
    Cited by:  Papers (17)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (7244 KB)  

    The paper discusses SeamlessDesign, a novel collaborative workspace for rapid creation of 3D objects with constraints. Its seamless design supports both shape and behavioral designs of 3D objects in a unified and intuitive manner. Virtual and augmented setups support both multiple perspectives for parallel activity and face-to-face interaction for rich awareness View full abstract»

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  • A combinatorial approach to content-based music selection

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 44 - 51
    Cited by:  Papers (9)  |  Patents (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (84 KB)  

    Accessing large digital music catalogues raises a problem for both users and content providers. We propose a novel approach to music selection called RecitalComposer, which is based on computing coherent sequences of music titles. This amounts to solving a combinatorial pattern generation problem by using constraint satisfaction techniques View full abstract»

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  • Interactive maps for a digital video library

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 60 - 67
    Cited by:  Papers (8)  |  Patents (18)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (788 KB)  

    To improve library access, the Informedia Digital Video Library uses automatic processing to derive descriptors for video. A new extension to the video processing extracts geographic references from these descriptors. The operational library interface shows the geographic entities addressed in a given story, highlighting the regions discussed in the video through a map display synchronized with the video playback. The map can also serve as a query mechanism, allowing users to search the terabyte library for stories taking place in a selected area of interest. This article discusses using interactive maps with the Informedia Digital Video Library View full abstract»

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  • User experience in the pervasive computing age

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 12 - 17
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (308 KB)  

    The pervasive computing age will provide easier and more satisfying ways for people to interact with their world. As a result, the ways we interact with people, information, organizations, processes, devices, appliances, places, and everyday things will change. We describe four aspects of living in the pervasive computing age from a user experience perspective: life networks will make it easy to capture, store, access, and process everything as information that flows to where authorized users need it; in attentive environments, inanimate things will seemingly become attentive and gain virtual affordances, providing users with responsive digital servants that respect privacy; with WorldBoard-like services, information will appear to exist in real places, providing users with enhanced information perception services; and intermediaries will enhance the flow of information, allowing users to get information the way they want it and securely provide personal information only when appropriate. These changes will affect the nature of information itself and provide us with many new ways to access it. We set the stage by providing an overview of some technology drivers such as improved communication, storage, processing, identification tags, sensors, displays, interaction technologies, and software technologies View full abstract»

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  • Making contact with artful CD-ROMs

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 4 - 6
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (356 KB)  

    CD-ROMs have only seriously begun to surface on the art scene in the last few years. Paradoxically, CD-ROMs came into their own as an artful medium by using existing media and reconfiguring and articulating them together in new ways. One of the crucial moments of this articulation is the moment of interactivity, the moment during which these constitutive media are fundamentally disrupted. To discuss the reconfiguring and rearticulation of existing media in CD-ROM art, I have chosen a number of examples from Contact Zones: The Art of CD-ROM, a traveling exhibition curated by Timothy Murray of Cornell University. This exhibition, which is itself a landmark in the CD-ROM's emergence as an art form, is impressive in its scale-more than 50 CD-ROMs from 18 countries. Until this exhibition reaches a venue near you, you can get a sense of its richness and the provocative questions it opens through its Web presence, http://contactzones.cit.cornell.edu/ View full abstract»

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  • Face tracking and realistic animations for telecommunicant clones

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 34 - 43
    Cited by:  Papers (8)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (708 KB)  

    Using realistic face models and photometric modeling techniques, we present a visual feedback loop that tracks a face, without any marker or controlled lighting, throughout a video sequence and precisely recovers the face position and orientation. We also propose animation techniques to embed realistic expressions in our 3D clones. Such face models permit automatic construction of appearance models View full abstract»

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The magazine contains technical information covering a broad range of issues in multimedia systems and applications

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John R. Smith
IBM T.J. Watson Research Center