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Networking, IEEE/ACM Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date Feb. 2000

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Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
  • Comments on "A deterministic approach to the end-to-end analysis of packet flows in connection oriented networks"

    Page(s): 121 - 124
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (146 KB)  

    For original paper see Chlamtac et al. (IEEE/ACM Trans. Networking, vol.6, no.4, p.422-31, 1998 August). We prove that the buffer bound in the above paper, can be improved by using a modification of the proofs in the original paper together with so-called network calculus bounds. We also show that the delay bound in the above paper, is the sum of worst-case queueing delays at all nodes along the path of a connection. View full abstract»

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  • List of reviewers

    Page(s): 125 - 127
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Secure group communications using key graphs

    Page(s): 16 - 30
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (344 KB)  

    Many emerging network applications are based upon a group communications model. As a result, securing group communications, i.e., providing confidentiality, authenticity, and integrity of messages delivered between group members, will become a critical networking issue. We present, in this paper, a novel solution to the scalability problem of group/multicast key management. We formalize the notion of a secure group as a triple (U,K,R) where U denotes a set of users, K a set of keys held by the users, and R a user-key relation. We then introduce key graphs to specify secure groups. For a special class of key graphs, we present three strategies for securely distributing rekey messages after a join/leave and specify protocols for joining and leaving a secure group. The rekeying strategies and join/leave protocols are implemented in a prototype key server we have built. We present measurement results from experiments and discuss performance comparisons. We show that our group key management service, using any of the three rekeying strategies, is scalable to large groups with frequent joins and leaves. In particular, the average measured processing time per join/leave increases linearly with the logarithm of group size View full abstract»

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  • A unified wireless LAN architecture for real-time and non-real-time communication services

    Page(s): 44 - 59
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (296 KB)  

    This paper addresses how to support both real-time and non-real-time communication services in a wireless LAN with dynamic time-division duplexed (D-TDD) transmission. With D-TDD, a frequency channel is time-shared for both downlink and uplink transmissions under the dynamic access control of the base station. The base station (1) handles uplink transmissions by polling mobiles in a certain order determined on a per-connection (per-message) basis for transmitting real-time (non-real-time) traffic from mobiles and (2) schedules the transmission of downlink packets. To handle location-dependent, time-varying, and bursty errors, we adopt the channel-state prediction, transmission deferment, and retransmission. We consider the problems of scheduling and multiplexing downlink packet transmissions, and polling mobiles for uplink transmissions depending on the channel state. We also establish conditions necessary to admit each new real-time connection by checking if the connection's delivery-delay bound can be guaranteed as long as the channel stays in good condition without compromising any of the existing guarantees. Last, the performance of the proposed protocol is evaluated to demonstrate how the protocol works and to study the effects of various parameters of the protocol View full abstract»

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  • The ERICA switch algorithm for ABR traffic management in ATM networks

    Page(s): 87 - 98
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (212 KB)  

    This paper describes the “explicit rate indication for congestion avoidance” (ERICA) scheme for rate-based feedback from asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) switches. In ERICA, the switches monitor their load on each link and determine a load factor, the available capacity, and the number of currently active virtual channels. This information is used to advise the sources about the rates at which they should transmit. The algorithm is designed to achieve high link utilization with low delays and fast transient response. It is also fair and robust to measurement errors caused by the variations in ABR demand and capacity. We present performance analysis of the scheme using both analytical arguments and simulation results. The scheme is being considered for implementation by several ATM switch manufacturers View full abstract»

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  • Statistical multiplexing and mix-dependent alternative routing in multiservice VP networks

    Page(s): 99 - 108
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    We consider problems in traffic integration and routing for virtual path (VP)-based multiservice networks. The objective is to exploit statistical multiplexing among various traffic types in order to improve system utilization. Difficulties arise due to statistical multiplexing since a connection's bandwidth requirement depends on the characteristics of the interfering traffic. We first consider whether segregating heterogeneous traffic with different quality of service (QoS) requirements on separate VPs is desirable. Next we consider routing heterogeneous permanent connections given a predefined traffic type mix onto multiple VPs between a source destination pair. We show that it is not necessarily advantageous to have each VP carry every traffic type. In fact, perhaps surprisingly, an optimum solution to this problem suggests that only a small number of traffic types, or even homogeneous traffic, need be present on each VP. Based on this observation, we propose a simple alternative routing algorithm with routing sequences depending on the traffic mix View full abstract»

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  • The UniMIN switch architecture for large-scale ATM switches

    Page(s): 109 - 120
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (284 KB)  

    A general expansion architecture is proposed that can be used in building large-scale switches using any type of asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) switch. The proposed universal multistage interconnection network (UniMIN) switch is composed of a buffered distribution network (DN) and a column of output switch modules (OSMs), which can be any type of ATM switch. ATM cells are routed to their destination using a two-level routing strategy. The DN provides each incoming cell with a self-routing path to the destined OSM, which is the switch module containing the destination output port. Further routing to the destined output port is performed by the destination OSM. Use of the channel grouping technique yields excellent delay/throughput performance in the DN, and the virtual FIFO concept is used for implementing the output buffers of the distribution module without internal speedup. We also propose a “fair virtual FIFO” to provide fairness between input links while preserving cell sequence. The distribution network is composed of one kind of distribution module which has the same size as the OSM, regardless of the overall switch size N. This gives good modular scalability in the UniMIN switch. Performance analysis for uniform traffic and hot-spot traffic shows that a negligible delay and cell loss ratio in the DN can be achieved with a small buffer size, and that DN yields robust performance even with hot-spot traffic. In addition, a fairness property of the proposed fair virtual FIFO is shown by a simulation study View full abstract»

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  • Enhanced distributed explicit rate allocation for ABR services in ATM networks

    Page(s): 71 - 86
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    Rate allocation for available bit-rate (ABR) services in ATM networks has received a considerable amount of attention, but important issues such as bandwidth fairness, MCR rate guarantees, and queue control still require further investigation. In light of these concerns, an enhanced rate allocation algorithm is proposed for congestion management using explicit rate feedback control. The algorithm uses fast, exact rate computations and is capable of achieving a variety of MCR-related fairness criteria. The scheme handles transient effects and can function in heterogeneous networks carrying higher priority real-time traffic. Simulation results for a wide range of network scenarios demonstrate that the algorithm effectively controls queue buildups and achieves good fairness. Performance scalability to large networks under challenging conditions is also shown for a given control parameter set View full abstract»

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  • Adaptive group multicast with time-driven priority

    Page(s): 31 - 43
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (240 KB)  

    This paper shows how to provide an adaptive real-time group multicast (many-to-many) communication service. Adaptive means that the number of nodes that transmit to the multicast group is continuously changing. In order to meet deterministic quality-of-service (QoS) requirements of a real-time group multicast, some communication resources are reserved. We show (1) how bandwidth is reserved for each multicast group and (2) how an active source can dynamically share the bandwidth allocated to this multicast group with other active group members. Quality-of-service support for a real-time multicast group is based on time-driven priority. In this scheme the time is divided into time frames of fixed duration, and all the time frames are aligned by using a common global time reference, which can be obtained from the Global Positioning System. Bandwidth is allocated to a multicast group as a whole, rather than individually to each user. The allocation is done by reserving time intervals within time frames in a periodic fashion. This type of allocation raises two problems that are studied in this paper: (1) scheduling: how time intervals are reserved to each multicast group and (2) adaptive sharing: how the active (transmitting) participants can dynamically share the time intervals that have been reserved for their multicast group. The proposed approach is based on the embedding of multiple virtual rings, one for each multicast group. By using the virtual rings, it is simple to route messages to all the participants while minimizing the bound on the buffer sizes and queueing delays. The final part of this paper introduces a scalable growth of the multicast group by adding multiple subtrees to the virtual ring View full abstract»

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  • Router plugins: a software architecture for next-generation routers

    Page(s): 2 - 15
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (524 KB)  

    Present-day Internet protocol routers typically employ monolithic operating systems that are not easily upgradable and extensible. With the rapid rate of protocol development it is becoming increasingly important to dynamically upgrade router software in an incremental fashion. We have designed and implemented a high-performance, modular, extended services router software architecture in the Net BSD operating system kernel. This architecture allows code modules, called plugins, to be dynamically added and configured at run time. One of the novel features of our design is the ability to bind different plugins to individual flows; this allows for distinct plugin implementations to seamlessly coexist in the same runtime environment. We achieve high performance through a carefully designed modular architecture, an innovative packet classification algorithm that is highly efficient, and by caching that exploits the flow-like characteristics of Internet traffic. Compared to a monolithic best effort kernel, our implementation requires an average increase in packet processing overhead of only 8%, or 600 cycles per packet when running on an Intel Pentium Pro at 233 MHz. By shortcutting the forward loop based on the per-flow state we establish, we can forward packets up to three times faster than the best effort kernel View full abstract»

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  • A dynamic regulation and scheduling scheme for real-time traffic management

    Page(s): 60 - 70
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (280 KB)  

    Typical rate-based traffic management schemes for real-time applications attempt to allocate resources by controlling the packet delivery to the resource arbitrator (scheduler). This control is typically based only on the characteristics of the particular (tagged) traffic stream and would fail to optimally adjust to non-nominal network conditions such as overload. In this paper, a dynamic regulation and scheduling (dynamic-R&S) scheme is proposed whose regulation function is modulated by both the tagged stream's characteristics and information capturing the state of the coexisting applications as provided by the scheduler. The performance of the proposed scheme-versus an equivalent static one-is investigated under both underload and overload traffic conditions. The substantially better throughput/jitter characteristics of the dynamic-R&S scheme are established View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking’s high-level objective is to publish high-quality, original research results derived from theoretical or experimental exploration of the area of communication/computer networking.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
R. Srikant
Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engineering
Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign