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Control Systems, IEEE

Issue 2 • Date April 2000

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Displaying Results 1 - 7 of 7
  • New CSS technical committee on automotive controls

    Page(s): 62 - 65
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (356 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Integrated navigation andguidance systems [Book Review]

    Page(s): 76
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (144 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • System dynamics and control [Bookshelf]

    Page(s): 76 - 78
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The frequency domain

    Page(s): 8 - 14
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    The author aims to give you some idea of what a pole is and why it is a significant concept. To do this, he gives a tour of the mysterious world that control engineers call the frequency domain. The article is intended as a conceptual preview for undergraduate students and assumes minimal technical background. The frequency domain is a kind of hidden companion to our everyday world of time. We describe what happens in the time domain as temporal and in the frequency domain as spectral. Roughly speaking, in the time domain we measure how long something takes, whereas in the frequency domain we measure how fast or slow it is. Why do control engineers like the frequency domain so much? In a nutshell, the reason is this: most signals and processes involve both fast and slow components happening at the same time. Frequency domain analysis separates these components and helps to keep track of them View full abstract»

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  • A synthetic environment for dynamic systems control and distributed simulation

    Page(s): 49 - 61
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    Rapid prototyping and controlled motion evaluation of complex human-machine interfaces, from nuclear plant operation panels to deep submerged underwater vehicles to advanced airplane cockpits, require hardware-in-the-loop, man-in-the-loop, and software integration. What appears to be needed is specific software to give designers tools for analyzing and simulating complex and integrated projects. The research software described in this article promises to fill that need, providing a new synthetic environment for simulation and control synthesis of dynamic systems. The article addresses problems of high performance, realistic environments, and vehicle simulation, with particular attention to synthetic world creation and visualization. The new software is capable of handling most of the simulation and visualization requirements highlighted View full abstract»

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  • Adaptive fuzzy temperature control for hydronic heating systems

    Page(s): 39 - 48
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    In a hydronic heating system, a boiler heats hot water that is pumped through pipes to radiators throughout the dwelling. This article describes an alternative to a traditional PI algorithm for hydronic heating system control. The control algorithm described is an adaptive fuzzy control (AFC) algorithm. It compactly combines a unique adaptation algorithm that automatically learns the steady-state radiator valve positions for different operating set points with a simple rule-based fuzzy controller. Laboratory test results comparing the performance of the AFC with a variable-gain PI algorithm demonstrate that the AFC combines better temperature control with dramatically reduced battery consumption View full abstract»

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  • Modeling and control of McKibben artificial muscle robot actuators

    Page(s): 15 - 38
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    The McKibben artificial muscle is a pneumatic device characterized by its high level of functional analogy with human skeletal muscle. While maintaining a globally cylindrical shape, the McKibben muscle produces a contraction force decreasing with its contraction ratio, as does skeletal muscle. The maximum force-to-weight ratio can be surprisingly high for a limited radial dimension and for a conventional pressure range. A 50 g McKibben muscle can easily develop more than 1000 N under 5 bar pressure for an external radius varying from about 1.5 to 3 cm. Thus, robotics specialists are interested in this well-adapted artificial muscle for motorizing powerful yet compact robot arms. The basic McKibben muscle static modeling developed in the paper, which is based on the three main parameters (i.e., initial braid angle, initial muscle length, and initial muscle radius) and includes a three-parameter friction model of the thread against itself, has shown its efficiency in both isometric and isotonic contraction View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Control Systems Magazine is the largest circulation technical periodical worldwide devoted to all aspects of control systems.

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Editor-in-Chief
Jonathan P. How
jhow@mit.edu