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Potentials, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date Feb/Mar 2000

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • Taking cues from Java [discrete simulation]

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 11 - 15
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (484 KB)  

    The article examines how discrete simulation and Java can light up the Web. Any programmer who is competent in Java will find that it is straightforward to develop a Java based discrete event simulation library useful for real work. However, the article only scratches the surface. Java has many other possibilities for extending discrete event simulation. For example, the in-built support can be provided by Java for remote method invocation to support distributed and client/server simulations. The Internet and the intranet protocols are a suitable way of supporting these developments. These present new ways of developing parallel and distributed simulations that do not need expensive, special purpose computer systems. Based on developments in computer supported cooperative work, Wilcox and Pooley discuss how Java can enable simulation users to jointly run simulation models even though they are separated in space and time. There is clearly much more to come View full abstract»

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  • Analyzing Web-based simulation data

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 16 - 19
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (370 KB)  

    The article deals only with simulation models that have stochastic, or random input. Classical statistical methods for independent observations assume that each observation carries the maximum information, and therefore they compute the smallest confidence interval. Since stationary simulation output data carries less information, the confidence interval resulting from applying classical statistical computations using autocorrelated observations would be too small. This would lead one to conclude the parameter estimate is much more precise than is actually the case. To get around this problem, several methods have been suggested in the output data analysis literature. Two of the most widely accepted methods are: 1) the method of independent replications; and 2) the method of batch means. Both methods try to avoid autocorrelation by breaking the data into “independent” segments. The sample means of these segments are considered i.i.d, and used to calculate confidence intervals. In the first method, several independent runs are executed. In the second method, a long simulation run is executed and divided into several “nearly uncorrelated” batches. The article specifically examines the Java Simulation (JSIM) Web based environment which has evolved to incorporate component based technology. If component based technology succeeds, the long hoped for gains in software development productivity may finally be realized View full abstract»

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  • Joining an internet startup

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 27 - 29
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (301 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
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  • What's the deal with “e-business”?

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 34 - 35
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (359 KB)  

    E-business is re-shaping the information technology infrastructure of many companies. While the definition varies depending on whom you talk to, it is usually something like IBM's definition: the transformation of key business processes through the use of Internet technologies. On the surface, this definition sounds like what we've been doing all along with information technology. However, this transformation is much more pervasive and complete than it has been in the past. E-commerce (the buying and selling of goods and services using Internet technologies) is only a small part of this transformation. The larger transformation involves how companies interact with one another and how they use the ubiquitous Internet infrastructure. The bottom line is that the impact of e-business is really one of improving a company's productivity. Flexible business arrangements between different companies make this possible. They also directly increase the productivity of individuals, workgroups, companies and industries. E-business is re-shaping how companies look at information technology used to support the company. (In the past, most of these systems had been internal, isolated and secured.) For e-businesses to work, they must have the ability to work with external customers, be integrated and still be secure View full abstract»

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  • Modeling the world-how it's blocked out on the Web

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 6 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (506 KB)  

    Placing bets on one technology over another is risky; however, there are some guiding lights. The Web is here to stay. It offers a way of sharing and presenting multimedia information to a worldwide set of interactive participants. Therefore, any technology tied to the Web's development is likely to change modeling and simulation. The tremendous interest in Java for doing simulation has taken a firm hold within the simulation field. Apart from being a good programming language, its future is intrinsically bound to the coding and interaction within a browser. VRML, and its X3D successor, represent the future of 3D immersing environments on the Web. Model handles and their accompanying object groups will remain invisible unless requested by those with a modeling bent. The modeling approach presented takes a substantial departure from existing approaches. That is the modeling environment and the object environment merge seamlessly into a single environment. There isn't a difference between a circle and a house, or a sphere and a teapot, Furthermore, objects can take on any role. This frees the modeler to choose whatever metaphor agreed upon by a certain community. There is no single syntax or structure for modeling. Modeling is both an art and a science; the realization that all objects can play roles takes us back to childhood. The Rube modeling environment is being built in the hope that by making all objects virtual we can return to free-form modeling of every kind View full abstract»

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  • Querying XML documents

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 24 - 26
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (362 KB)  

    Web based environments will typically need to maintain many documents (e.g. simulation model information and data results from multiple sites). Ideally, this information would be held in a widely utilized and highly viewable format. The eXtensible Markup Language (XML) is a new standard that meets this criteria for World Wide Web based applications. It is sophisticated enough so that complex real world structures and relationships may be captured. Large collections of XML documents can be stored for efficient retrieval using database management systems (DBMSs). Current database management is represented by the object oriented (OO) and object-relational (OR) database systems. Each type has their own query languages, Object Query Language (OQL, v.2) and Structured Query Language (SQL), respectively. These database query languages provide a high-level way to ask for information from a database. The article looks at storing and retrieving XML documents. It surveys work being done on query languages and tools for XML. It then discusses a simple graphical XML query tool for front end use in the Java Simulation (JSIM) Web based simulation environment View full abstract»

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  • Eddy current magnetic levitation. Models and experiments

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 40 - 44
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (493 KB)  

    We present a simple demonstration of eddy-current magnetic levitation using a small copper coil, energized with 60 Hz AC and levitated over an aluminum plate. The processes that generate magnetic forces are identified using Maxwell's equations. Through this experiment, a method for determining lift-off power, levitation height and suspension resonant frequency is shown. The principles outlined in this article have numerous applications to magnetic levitation, induction heating and other electrodynamic processes involving induced eddy currents. Scaling laws show how to size a suspension conductor and power supply for a given levitated load View full abstract»

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  • Meta data

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 20 - 23
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (387 KB)  

    Meta data provides an architecture or framework describing the user's data within a data environment. This architecture should provide a precise, coherent and logical structure that “paints a picture” of the data. It also should describe how the data internal to the data environment is interfaced to the external world. Satisfying the different needs of users and implementers, obtaining all the desirable qualities of meta data, while interfacing with various data systems is certainly a Herculean task for meta data. Basically, there seem to be three approaches to managing meta data: meta data bridges; meta data repositories; and intelligent software agents. One meta data repository trying to catch on is Microsoft's Repository (MDC-OIM). It uses the Open Information Model (OIM) as its base. The Meta Data Coalition (MDC) and the Object Management Group (OMG) have refined this OIM model. Both groups have also proposed it as the common standard for meta data exchange. The goal of the MDC-OIM repository is to allow creation, reuse and exchange of meta data across multiple hardware and software platforms. This includes the meta data integration of all tools, applications and databases for each individual platform View full abstract»

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  • Electronic commerce infrastructure

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 30 - 33
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (390 KB)  

    Electronic commerce (E-commerce) is all the rage these days. About 100 million users and at least one million businesses already reachable via the Internet have made it that way. This critical mass compares to the market economy of North America, Japan or Europe. But doing business electronically means shifting critical business processes to open networks. It also means connecting back-end business applications in a secure and flexible way. Is there anything preventing the continued proliferation of this economy? Yes. A software infrastructure that allows all participants to carry out business transactions is still lacking. As a result, specialty market reference architectures are still needed to help identify important players, roles and relationships of the various markets and their participants. These architectures define the major components these participants require to carry out business transactions in that particular market. By defining interfaces and the semantics of the involved services, reference architectures provide patterns for software developers. These patterns help the software developers to implement coherent pacts to the overall electronic market system View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Potentials is the magazine dedicated to undergraduate and graduate students and young professionals.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
David Tian
Carnegie Mellon University
david.tian@ieee.org