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Personal Communications, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date Feb. 2000

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • Connectivity and Application enablers for ubiquitous computing and communications [Guest Editorial]

    Page(s): 6 - 7
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The Bluetooth radio system

    Page(s): 28 - 36
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    A few years ago it was recognized that the vision of a truly low-cost, low-power radio-based cable replacement was feasible. Such a ubiquitous link would provide the basis for portable devices to communicate together in an ad hoc fashion by creating personal area networks which have similar advantages to their office environment counterpart, the local area network. Bluetooth/sup TM/ is an effort by a consortium of companies to design a royalty-free technology specification enabling this vision. This article describes the radio system behind the Bluetooth concept. Designing an ad hoc radio system for worldwide usage poses several challenges. The article describes the critical system characteristics and motivates the design choices that have been made. View full abstract»

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  • Author Index

    Page(s): 1 - 2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Subject index

    Page(s): 2 - 7
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IrDA: past, present and future

    Page(s): 11 - 19
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    The core Internet technologies were in the hands of the research community 10 or more years before the World Wide Web happened and popularized the Internet as a place to find information, access service, and trade. The Infrared Data Association has been in existence for over six years. Products embedding the communication technology the IrDA defines have been around for over five years, starting with printers and portable PCs. IrDA is cheap to embed, uses unregulated spectrum, and is increasingly pervasive in a wide range of devices. From its roots in portable PCs and printers, IrDA technology is present in virtually all new PDAs, it is emerging in mobile phones, pagers, digital cameras, and image capture devices. We are sitting on the cusp of the information appliance age, and IrDA is playing a significant role in enabling the interaction between information appliances, between information appliances and the information infrastructure, and between appliances communicating across the information infrastructure. This article discusses IrDA's communications model. It charts the evolution of the IrDA-Data (1.x) platform architecture, and the early applications and application services now in common Use. It considers the present day and the explosion in device categories embedding the IrDA platform. It broadens its horizons to consider other emerging appliances technologies and to consider communications models that might arise from a blend of IrDA short-range wireless communications and mobile object technologies. Finally, it considers future directions for the IrDA platform itself View full abstract»

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  • System support for mobile, adaptive applications

    Page(s): 44 - 49
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    Imagine that, while on a business trip to Paris, you decide to take a few extra days to sample the city's museums. When you buy your museum pass, you are given a virtual tour guide device-a small PDA that can deliver information about specific pieces in the museum system as well as general information about the city. This device communicates via wireless networks. In or near a museum, the device has access to a high-speed micro-cellular network; in the rest of the city, it makes use of the GSM infrastructure. The user can ask this device to elaborate on specific sites or pieces, display related information, or perform geographically-based queries. These requests are satisfied by applications such as a customized Web browser and a video playback application. When within range of a museum's high-quality network, the displayed information is of excellent quality: images are at high resolution and color, and video is delivered in full motion. However, when the user strays away from the high-bandwidth network, each application degrades the quality of the data it delivers so that it arrives in a timely fashion View full abstract»

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  • HomeRF: wireless networking for the connected home

    Page(s): 20 - 27
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    The SWAP specification for wireless voice and data networking within the home will enable a new class of mobile consumer devices that draw from the power and content of the Internet and the home PC. If cable modems and xDSL represent the “last mile” access to the home, then HomeRFTM's mission with SWAP could be called the “very last 150 feet” within and around the home. HomeRF has the broad backing of the major corporate stakeholders for networking within the home and is optimized specifically for the cost/performance point needed for consumers. The technology leverages the existing PC-industry infrastructure around the Internet, TCP/IP, and Ethernet, and adds a standard way to connect to the PSTN for voice telephony. First products should appear in late 1999, and future versions with enhanced features and/or higher data rates should follow in one to two years View full abstract»

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  • Paving the way for personal area network standards: an overview of the IEEE P802.15 Working Group for Wireless Personal Area Networks

    Page(s): 37 - 43
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    The process of creating international standards is a mystery to most people, even to the technologists who use them every day. This article describes the origins and processes of the IEEE Project 802.15 Working Group for Wireless Personal Area Networks and their effort to bring standardization to the Bluetooth specification. The committee of experts that comprises P802.15 is chartered with codifying the physical characteristics and protocols used to construct small, low-power, ad hoc networks used for wireless interconnection of personal electronic devices View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

This Magazine ceased publication in 2001. The current retitled publication is IEEE Wireless Communications.

Full Aims & Scope