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IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering

Issue 6 • Date Nov.-Dec. 1999

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Displaying Results 1 - 10 of 10
  • Guest editorial: introduction to the special section

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):747 - 748
    Request permission for commercial reuse | PDF file iconPDF (144 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Guest editorial: introduction to the special section

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):782 - 783
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | PDF file iconPDF (218 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Measuring process consistency: implications for reducing software defects

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):800 - 815
    Cited by:  Papers (43)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1220 KB)

    In this paper, an empirical study that links software process consistency with product defects is reported. Various measurement issues such as validity, reliability, and other challenges in measuring process consistency at the project level are discussed. A measurement scale for software process consistency is introduced. An empirical study that uses this scale to measure consistency in achieving ... View full abstract»

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  • Managing process inconsistency using viewpoints

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):784 - 799
    Cited by:  Papers (17)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1084 KB)

    Discusses the notion of software process inconsistency and suggests that inconsistencies in software processes are inevitable and sometimes desirable. We present an approach to process analysis that helps discover different perceptions of a software process and that supports the discovery of process inconsistencies and process improvements stimulated by these inconsistencies. By analogy with viewp... View full abstract»

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  • Managing requirements inconsistency with development goal monitors

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):816 - 835
    Cited by:  Papers (29)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1684 KB)

    Managing the development of software requirements can be a complex and difficult task. The environment is often chaotic. As analysts and customers leave the project, they are replaced by others who drive development in new directions. As a result, inconsistencies arise. Newer requirements introduce inconsistencies with older requirements. The introduction of such requirements inconsistencies may v... View full abstract»

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  • Managing standards compliance

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):836 - 851
    Cited by:  Papers (28)  |  Patents (3)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1440 KB)

    Software engineering standards determine practices that “compliant” software processes shall follow. Standards generally define practices in terms of constraints that must hold for documents. The document types identified by standards include typical development products, such as user requirements, and also process-oriented documents, such as progress reviews and management reports. Th... View full abstract»

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  • Conflicts in policy-based distributed systems management

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):852 - 869
    Cited by:  Papers (221)  |  Patents (15)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1520 KB)

    Modern distributed systems contain a large number of objects and must be capable of evolving, without shutting down the complete system, to cater for changing requirements. There is a need for distributed, automated management agents whose behavior also has to dynamically change to reflect the evolution of the system being managed. Policies are a means of specifying and influencing management beha... View full abstract»

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  • Space efficient execution of deterministic parallel programs

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):870 - 882
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (852 KB)

    We model a deterministic parallel program by a directed acyclic graph of tasks, where a task can execute as soon as all tasks preceding it have been executed. Each task can allocate or release an arbitrary amount of memory (i.e., heap memory allocation can be modeled). We call a parallel schedule “space efficient” if the amount of memory required is at most equal to the number of proce... View full abstract»

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  • Measuring and evaluating maintenance process using reliability, risk, and test metrics

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):769 - 781
    Cited by:  Papers (30)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (660 KB)

    In analyzing the stability of a software maintenance process, it is important that it is not treated in isolation from the reliability and risk of deploying the software that result from applying the process. Furthermore, we need to consider the efficiency of the test effort that is a part of the process and a determinate of reliability and risk of deployment. The relationship between product qual... View full abstract»

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  • Identifying modules via concept analysis

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):749 - 768
    Cited by:  Papers (47)  |  Patents (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1184 KB)

    Describes a general technique for identifying modules in legacy code. The method is based on concept analysis - a branch of lattice theory that can be used to identify similarities among a set of objects based on their attributes. We discuss how concept analysis can identify potential modules using both “positive” and “negative” information. We present an algorithmic framew... View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tse-eic@computer.org