Computer

Issue 2 • Feb. 2000

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Displaying Results 1 - 17 of 17
  • Food for thought [Letters]

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s): 4
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Uncovering erroneous assumptions [Letters]

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s): 4
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Einstein's nobel prize [Letters]

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):6 - 8
    Cited by:  Patents (9)
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Small-project process improvement [Letters]

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s): 7
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Biometrics: The future of identification [Guest Eeditors' Introduction]

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):46 - 49
    Cited by:  Papers (73)  |  Patents (7)
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Why digital entertainment drives the need for speed

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):124 - 127
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (584 KB)

    By aggressively maneuvering to seize and expand their market share, the entertainment industry's biggest players are shaping a 21st century in which consumer demand for entertainment will drive computing innovation. Private sector research and development spending, which now accounts for 75 percent of total US R&D, will increase to about $187.2 billion in 2000, up from an estimated $169.3 bill... View full abstract»

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  • Intellectual-propepty protection opens path for E-commerce

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):14 - 21
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (204 KB)

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  • Mobile-agent coordination models for Internet applications

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):82 - 89
    Cited by:  Papers (89)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (100 KB)

    Internet applications face challenges that mobile agents and the adoption of enhanced coordination models may overcome. Each year more applications shift from intranets to the Internet, and Internet-oriented applications become more popular. New design and programming paradigms call help harness the Web's potential. Traditional distributed applications assign a set of processes to a given executio... View full abstract»

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  • An iris biometric system for public and personal use

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):70 - 75
    Cited by:  Papers (32)  |  Patents (13)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (600 KB)

    Much work in the emerging field of biometrics has focused on identification applications. Biometrics offers the means to identify individuals without requiring that they carry ID cards and badges or memorize passwords. A leading concern in the development of such applications, however, is how to avoid rejecting valid users or approving imposters. The iris of the eye may provide a solution by offer... View full abstract»

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  • An emerging biometric API industry standard

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):130 - 132
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (176 KB)

    In an emerging industry, standards are key to the industry's growth and a technology's acceptance. Biometrics is a relatively young industry with immense potential and is thus a key target for standardization. Its roots lie in law enforcement and other government applications, in which custom integration was the norm, so its not surprising that the standards to adapt biometrics to off-the-shelf ap... View full abstract»

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  • Shopbots become agents for business change

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):18 - 21
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (136 KB)

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  • Federal biometric technology legislation

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):76 - 80
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (568 KB)

    Voters in the United States expect the government to deliver more services to an increasing population in a more efficient, cost-effective, and fraud-free manner, while limiting the size and scope of the governmental infrastructure. Encouraged or mandated by federal legislation, governmental agencies at all levels have turned to technology in an attempt to meet these competing requirements. Howeve... View full abstract»

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  • Can you trust software capability evaluations?

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):28 - 35
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (140 KB)

    In the early 1989s, the US Department of Defense suffered many monetary, schedule, and performance costs because it misjudged the ability of its contractors to develop software. Recognizing that this was less a reflection on the organizations themselves than on the general immaturity of the software industry, the DoD helped create the Software Engineering Institute with the aim of studying ways to... View full abstract»

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  • EPIC: Explicitly Parallel Instruction Computing

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):37 - 45
    Cited by:  Papers (47)  |  Patents (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (184 KB)

    Over the past two and a half decades, the computer industry has grown accustomed to the spectacular rate of increase in microprocessor performance. The industry accomplished this without fundamentally rewriting programs in parallel form, without changing algorithms or languages, and often without even recompiling programs. Instruction level parallel processing achieves high performance without maj... View full abstract»

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  • Face recognition for smart environments

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):50 - 55
    Cited by:  Papers (94)  |  Patents (22)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (272 KB)

    Smart environments, wearable computers, and ubiquitous computing in general are the coming “fourth generation” of computing and information technology. But that technology will be a stillbirth without new interfaces for interaction, minus a keyboard or mouse. To win wide consumer acceptance, these interactions must be friendly and personalized; the next generation interfaces must recog... View full abstract»

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  • An introduction evaluating biometric systems

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):56 - 63
    Cited by:  Papers (107)  |  Patents (9)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (404 KB)

    On the basis of media hype alone, you might conclude that biometric passwords will soon replace their alphanumeric counterparts with versions that cannot be stolen, forgotten, lost, or given to another person. But what if the actual performance of these systems falls short of the estimates? The authors designed this article to provide sufficient information to know what questions to ask when evalu... View full abstract»

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  • BiolD: a multimodal biometric identification system

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):64 - 68
    Cited by:  Papers (133)  |  Patents (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1060 KB)

    Biometric identification systems, which use physical features to check a person's identity, ensure much greater security than password and number systems. Biometric features such as the face or a fingerprint can be stored on a microchip in a credit card, for example. A single feature, however, sometimes fails to be exact enough for identification. Another disadvantage of using only one feature is ... View full abstract»

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Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes peer-reviewed articles written for and by computer researchers and practitioners representing the full spectrum of computing and information technology, from hardware to software and from emerging research to new applications. 

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Sumi Helal
Lancaster University
sumi.helal@computer.org