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Spectrum, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date Jan. 2000

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Displaying Results 1 - 16 of 16
  • Transportation [Technology 2000 analysis and forecast]

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 91 - 96
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (533 KB)  

    Future prospects in the field of transportation are outlined by the author in this paper. Topics covered include intelligent transport; fleet operations; smart cars; vehicle safety; in-vehicle data; mass transit; and railways. View full abstract»

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  • Industrial electronics [Technology 2000 analysis and forecast]

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 104 - 109
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (530 KB)  

    Energy savings and higher intelligence are hallmarks of today's highly competitive world of industrial automation. While power electronics devices and systems deliver ever more watts, they also contribute to electromagnetic interference (EMI), and users are becoming aware of the need to increase their overall system reliability. Teetering on the verge of acceptance are easily programmable service robots, automatically cleaning their way around public facilities. At the same time, researchers are exploring the possibility of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology on the factory floor. Both the water content of products and their material hardness are being analyzed by MRI scans to monitor product quality. For embedded systems designers, who have the complex task of testing and debugging embedded processors, relief is in the offing with a new, global standard. The standard, for a device interface for embedded processors, should simplify the testing and debugging of the processors used in such fields as automotive electronics, aerospace, telecommunications, appliances, and consumer electronics. Simplifying those tasks ought to shorten the time to market of products and systems in most, if not all, of these areas. View full abstract»

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  • Consumer electronics [Technology 2000 analysis and forecast]

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 51 - 56
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (964 KB)  

    Most 20th-Century consumer electronic products have evolved predictably. A new technology proved feasible, a standard was set for it, and high-priced products were rolled out and snapped up by the ever-eager early adopter. Then, as production ramped up, prices dropped and the product became a mass-market item. This happened for television, radio, and audio compact disks. But that may not be the case in the 2lst century. Products launched in 1999 went from announcement to mass-market rollout in nearly the blink of an eye, issues like standards and copyrights have been left to be settled in their wake. The first 2lst-century product to follow this model was the downloadable digital audio player. These portable MP3 players, so called because they use the compression technology specified in Layer 3 of the MPEG-2 standard, are used to store downloaded digital music files from the Internet, and then play them back off line. Other developments include security, hard disk recorders, videogames, digital cameras, and digital TV View full abstract»

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  • Communications [Technology 2000 analysis and forecast]

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 33 - 38
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (568 KB)  

    The mergers and acquisitions on-going among communications companies around the world fall mostly into two categories. Some deals involve similar companies-two cellular service providers, say, seeking to plug gaps in their coverage footprints and to cut costs by reducing churn, eliminating roaming charges, and coordinating the purchase of handsets and other equipment. Others involve complementary companies-perhaps a long-distance carrier and a local service provider looking to increase revenue by bundling their services, selling them to a larger customer base, and together creating new services. Amidst all the merger frenzy, one thing that the key players and some of their larger customers have discovered is IP telephony-that is, packet-switched telephony running over a network that uses the Internet Protocol. The strategy of running voice and data traffic on the same network could both cut communications costs and make new services possible. But, for the Internet itself, those goals will not be reached without some serious tradeoffs, of which voice quality and privacy loom largest. With all the attention that cellular companies are now getting, wireless communication has also become a hot commodity. Ubiquitous connectivity seems to be envisioned in which people will always be able to communicate with each other and with the Internet, though perhaps not always with high bandwidth View full abstract»

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  • Test and measurement [Technology 2000 analysis and forecast]

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 75 - 79
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (412 KB)  

    The awareness that every electronic product, from PCs to Internet appliances, is pining for tinier and more powerful chips is whipping semiconductor development along at a frenetic pace. It is also hounding automation of design and test and IC test development, but test inevitably lags behind chip development. Devising (and performing) tests for the so-called system on a chip is a time-consuming process. Many thousands of test patterns and vectors must be created, as must protocols, and the fault coverage achieved must be high enough to complete the necessary testing and to minimize the cost. The challenges multiply further as the test chain ascends from chip to board to system and ultimately field-level tests. Each level adds expense so that soon, by some estimates, test could account for half of the final cost of a chip View full abstract»

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  • The Internet [Technology 2000 analysis and forecast]

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 40 - 44
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (284 KB)  

    In developed nations around the world in 1999, the Internet entered the mainstream of consciousness. In 2000, it enters the mainstream of daily life. Improvements in speed, accessibility, and usefulness-coupled with the lowest prices ever for computers and free Internet access, or vice versa-will likely make for the most explosive growth yet. Business is expecting to make the most of that growth. The only obstacle to global progress is regulation and the need to make the Internet robust enough to stand the traffic. The forecasts include raising the speed limit of the information highway, Internet name registration goes global, the US lifts constraints on encryption exports, and the ranks of the digital economy get crowded View full abstract»

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  • The environment [Technology 2000 analysis and forecast]

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 81 - 85
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (712 KB)  

    The author describes how research into making today's increasingly pervasive electronic products more environmentally safe is being spurred by concerns at both the global level-environmental contamination that will last for generations-and the personal level-the health of an individual View full abstract»

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  • Electronic design automation [Technology 2000 analysis and forecast]

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 70 - 74
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (748 KB)  

    Three obstacles in particular bedevil IC designers in this dawn of the system on a chip. The first is actually a shortfall-the hardware and software components of the design lack a unifying language. Then, as the number of logic gates per chip passes the million mark, verification of a design's correctness is fast becoming more arduous than doing the design itself. And finally, not only gate counts but chip frequencies also are climbing, so that getting a design to meet its timing requirements without too many design iterations is a receding goal. As is the wont of the electronic design automation (EDA) community, these concerns are being attacked by start-up companies led by a few individuals with big ideas and a little seed money View full abstract»

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  • Technical software [Technology 2000 analysis and forecast]

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 58 - 62
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (840 KB)  

    Twenty years ago, only a handful of visionaries could have predicted that powerful software born of supercomputing would butt its way into almost every desktop PC. Few foresaw the scale of data that would be manipulated or the complexity of the tasks that would be performed by software tools costing a few hundred dollars. But now, all developers of technical software take it as given that users may need to process gigabytes of data drawn from a combination of sources: instrument output; archived data; and publicly available materials, such as census data downloaded from the Internet. In this paper, the author argues that, in a sophisticated marketplace, the success of those developers hinges on equipping users to gain ever swifter insight into many reams of data View full abstract»

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  • Power and energy [Technology 2000 analysis and forecast]

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 86 - 90
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (900 KB)  

    Partly because it is the turn of the Century and the Millennium, and partly because the huge challenges facing the electric power industry cry out for bold new approaches, a number of influential organizations have formulated sweeping plans for the world's energy future. Ironically, at just the time these far-reaching roadmaps have been appearing, the US power system has been plagued by concrete, workaday problems that just as manifestly are not being adequately addressed. Over the last decade, the power system has been converted into a common carrier network; the vertically integrated utilities of tradition have been “unbundled” into generators, distributors, and transmitters of electricity and much of the time-honored regulatory apparatus has been dismantled or weakened. From one point of view, the system looks to be separating Lear-like into a set of feuding baronies. Even as each proffers its own view of the situation and vies with the others- to impose or sell a preferred approach, none has the legal, political, or moral authority to do so View full abstract»

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  • Technology 2000

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 26 - 31
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    First Page of the Article
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  • Aerospace and military [Technology 2000 analysis and forecast]

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 97 - 102
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    If aerospace has not met the best and brightest predictions of a half-century ago, the years ahead still promise plenty of action. As the millennium turns, China and perhaps France will soon join the United States and Russia in being able to put men and women into space aboard their own home-built transports. And the demand for satellite launch services is booming, as last year saw the first commercial flight of the Ariane 5 rocket and the first commercial liftoff from Sea Launch, the innovative ocean-based launch platform. NASA, meanwhile, is still smarting from the back-to-back losses of two Mars probes and the temporary shutdown of its orbiting Hubble Space Telescope. On the military front, the US Air Force continues to push for the F-22 fighter aircraft, even as some in Congress would declare it dead in favor of the Joint Strike Fighter. Advanced submarines are on the drawing boards of several countries, including the United States. Plans for these underwater behemoths, like their highly maneuverable airborne brethren, call for ever-increasing amounts of automation and electronics. Civil aviation, after taking much flak in 1999 for overcrowded skies and Y2K impacts on air travel, is pushing confidently into the next century. Global positioning systems (GPS) are inspiring advances in navigational equipment, and replacement systems for outmoded air traffic control set-ups draw ever closer to widescale deployment. A big obstacle remains, however, to fulfilling these goals in the next century. It is the same one as has delayed putting a person on Mars or building an orbiting space station-the price tag View full abstract»

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  • Medical electronics [Technology 2000 analysis and forecast]

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 110 - 115
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (372 KB)  

    The mystery shrouding the interior of a patient's body lifted a little further last year. One noteworthy step was the simultaneous application of a pair of imaging techniques (not just one) to internal organs and tissues. Another was a virtual approach to endoscopy, enabling physicians to inspect organs for disease without invading the body with a catheter or other device. The most dazzling revelations, though, arose from the race to decode the human genome-that is, to uncover the sequence of each gene's four chemical bases: adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine. Late last year, researchers said they had decoded most of the genes on Chromosome 22, and by the spring, 90 percent of the human genome will be decoded. Other cellular techniques have also borne fresh fruit. For example, an application of mass spectroscopy has made it possible to inspect the proteins of a cell all at once, instead of picking them out and analyzing them individually View full abstract»

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  • Computing [Technology 2000 analysis and forecast]

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 45 - 50
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (620 KB)  

    The dawning of this millennium coincides with the start of a new epoch-that of Internet-distributed computing-and, as is typical with epochal changes, the entrenched are being uprooted. A new breed of device-the Internet appliance-is dethroning the PC, which has held sway over the computing industry for the last two decades. Microsoft Inc., the Redmond, Wash., software megalith whose Windows operating system has towered over the system software arena for the last decade, must now do battle on two fronts: at the heart of the network-the server-and at the edges, with the new Internet devices. As the number and size of Web publishers mushroom, so does the demand for servers and storage. Sales of server hardware and operating systems are growing rapidly, and Microsoft 2000, formerly known as Windows NT 5.0, must duke it out with established Unix systems and new Linux boxes. With growing reliance on the Internet for all kinds of information, computing is acquiring an unsuspected mobility. Unlike a laptop computer, which requires that the user be stationary (preferably seated) to be of use, Internet appliances free the user to work on the go, in ways not previously possible. Even as information technology reaches the next stage in its evolution, the PC has become something of a dinosaur, a metamorphosis that cannot be stopped even by Microsoft. In fact, while the outcome of its confrontation with the US Department of Justice may be to reshape the company in some way, it is the Internet that is truly restructuring Microsoft View full abstract»

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  • Engineering tomorrow: today's technology experts envision the next century

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 10 - 15
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    First Page of the Article
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  • Devices and circuits [Technology 2000 analysis and forecast]

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 63 - 69
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    In the high-profile electronics industry, a new microprocessor architecture is enough of a rarity to excite great anticipation. In the first year of the third millennium, industry watchers will have plenty to look forward to, as the first batch of high-end computers built with Intel Corp.'s new microprocessor, Itanium (formerly Merced), becomes available. This year could also mark the beginning of the end for microprocessors with clock rates below a gigahertz. Leading the attack will be the Power4 processor chip from IBM Corp. and the Alpha 21364 from Compaq Computer Corp., both slated to run at speeds of 1 GHz and higher View full abstract»

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