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IEEE Industry Applications Magazine

Issue 1 • Date Jan 2000

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Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • IEEE Std 515 takes a step toward harmonization

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):21 - 27
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (352 KB)

    IEEE Recommended Practice 515 for the "Testing, Design, Installation, and Maintenance of Electrical Resistance Heat Tracing for Industrial Applications" was first published in 1983. During the first five-year review cycle, which took place from 1984 to 1990, a major effort was made to harmonize 515 with other North American and European standards. The Project Authorization Request (PAR) for the se... View full abstract»

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  • Comparing test requirements for low-voltage circuit breakers

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):45 - 52
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (420 KB)

    Low-voltage circuit protective devices include low-voltage power circuit breakers, insulated case circuit breakers, and molded case circuit breakers. Each of these circuit breaker types is used for particular applications, and is tested against standards that relate to those applications. In North America, low-voltage power circuit breakers are designed and tested in accordance with ANSI/UL standa... View full abstract»

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  • The outlook for global unity in hazardous-area equipment

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):8 - 13
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (732 KB)

    Modifications to the National Electrical Code (NEC) and Canadian Electrical Code (CEC) have created changes and complications in the marking and approvals of new explosion-protected products. Instead of making the practice of consolidating approvals for globalized products simpler, Canada and the US have gone in different directions. This, in turn, may confuse many who manufacture, specify, instal... View full abstract»

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  • Harmonizing electrotechnical standards in North America

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):28 - 34
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (412 KB)

    The creation of the North American free trade zone, and possibly an Americas free trade zone, will permit the US to compete on an equal footing with the European and Australasian markets. Harmonization of the electrotechnical product standards, conformity assessment test standards, and the electrical installation codes will greatly facilitate trade between Mexico, Canada, and the United States, an... View full abstract»

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  • Process industry initiative sets common design practices

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):14 - 20
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (320 KB)

    The Process Industry Practices (PIP) initiative is the successful effort of a group of twenty-three process industry companies and eight engineering and construction companies to produce voluntary recommended practices for engineering, procurement, and construction of equipment and facilities in the continuous process industries. PIP's defined goal is to harmonize the technical requirements from t... View full abstract»

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  • Industrial facilities gain new area classification guidelines

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):35 - 44
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (584 KB)

    Both the United States National Electrical Code (NEC) and the Canadian Electrical Code (CEC) provide special rules for installing electrical equipment in hazardous (classified) locations. Hazardous locations are those locations where fire or explosion hazards may exist due to flammable gases or vapors, flammable liquids, combustible dust, or easily ignitible fibers or flyings. Only Class I materia... View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Industry Applications Magazine publishes articles concerning technical subjects and professional activities that are within the Scope of the IEEE Industry Applications Society (IAS) and are of interest to society members

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
H. Landis "Lanny" Floyd
 

eic-iam@ieee.org