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Software, IEE Proceedings -

Issue 4 • Date Aug. 1999

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Displaying Results 1 - 5 of 5
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  • Software engineering research: a critical appraisal

    Page(s): 179 - 186
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (628 KB)  

    It is argued that computer science and software engineering should be regarded as separate disciplines, and that the long term success of academic computer science departments will only be secured by adopting a stronger engineering stance in research, enhanced by closer links with industry. A number of ways are suggested to revitalise the software engineering community and forge stronger links with industry, particularly through a better and more coherent research base View full abstract»

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  • Test cases generation from UML state diagrams

    Page(s): 187 - 192
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (460 KB)  

    The paper discusses the application of state diagrams in UML to class testing. A set of coverage criteria is proposed based on control and data flow in UML state diagrams and it is shown how to generate test cases satisfying these criteria from UML state diagrams. First, control flow is identified by transforming UML state diagrams into extended finite state machines (EFSMs). The hierarchical and concurrent structure of states is flattened and broadcast communications are eliminated in the resulting EFSMs. Second, data flow is identified by transforming EFSMs into flow graphs to which conventional data flow analysis techniques can be applied View full abstract»

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  • Multiple view environment supporting VDM and Ada

    Page(s): 203 - 219
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (940 KB)  

    The paper presents a multiple view, software development environment that supports transformation between VDM and Ada. The environment allows a software system to be represented in a canonical, source language independent form. This representation may then be viewed, and modified, via editors which support different notation. Two specific editors have been developed; one supports the Vienna Development Method (VDM) notation, and the other supports the Ada programming language package specification notation. Automatic transformation between the two notations is achieved via the canonical representation. The representation is stored in a repository implemented using the Portable Common Tool Environment (PCTE), and the editors are implemented using Tcl/Tk View full abstract»

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  • Effects of structure on the comprehensibility of formal specifications

    Page(s): 193 - 202
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (608 KB)  

    Use of structuring mechanisms (such as modularisation) is widely believed to be one of the key ways to improve software quality. Structuring is considered to be at least as important for specification documents as for source code, since it is assumed to improve comprehensibility. Yet, as with most widely held assumptions in software engineering, there is little empirical evidence to support this hypothesis. Also, even if structuring can be shown to be a good thing, we do not know how much structuring is somehow optimal. One of the more popular formal specification languages, Z, encourages structuring through its schema calculus. A controlled experiment is described in which two hypotheses about the effects of structure on the comprehensibility of Z specifications are tested. Evidence was found that structuring a specification into schemas of about 20 lines long significantly improved comprehensibility over a monolithic specification. However, there seems to be no perceived advantage in breaking down the schemas into much smaller components. The experiment can be fully replicated View full abstract»

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