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Information Technology in Biomedicine, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 4 • Date Dec. 1999

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • Guest Editorial

    Page(s): 241
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • A computer-assisted training/monitoring system for TURP structure and design

    Page(s): 242 - 251
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    A generic framework for a computer-assisted system for both soft tissue endoscopic surgery and surgical training is being researched and developed. The concept demonstrator is a specific system for transurethral prostatic resection (TURF). The main novelty of the research is that it is not confined to an in vitro trainer system. An in vivo monitoring version of the system, for use in the operating theater, is also being researched. This paper presents the framework's structure and design using the Unified Modeling Language. It also discusses and justifies the underlying information technologies chosen to implement this approach. Object-oriented concepts and well-proven mathematical tools have been adopted as the foundation of this research and development. The rationale for having chosen such tools is presented. The objectives are to arrive at a system which is modular, general, and reusable. View full abstract»

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  • CRIGOS: a compact robot for image-guided orthopedic surgery

    Page(s): 252 - 260
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    The CRIGOS (compact robot for image-guided orthopedic surgery) project was set up for the development of a compact surgical robot system for image-guided orthopedic surgery based on user requirements. The modular system comprises a compact parallel robot and a software system for planning of surgical interventions and for supervision of the robotic device. Because it is not sufficient to consider only technical aspects in order to improve clinical routines the therapeutic outcome of conventional interventions, a user-centered and task-oriented design process has been developed which also takes human factors into account. The design process for the CRIGOS system was started from requirement analysis of various orthopedic interventions using information gathered from literature, questionnaires, and workshops with domain experts. This resulted in identification of conventional interventions for which the robotic system would improve the medical and procedural quality. A system design concept has been elaborated which includes definitions of components, functionalities, and interfaces, Approaches to the acquisition of calibrated X-rays will be presented in the paper together with design and evaluation of a first human-computer interface. Finally, the first lab-type parallel robot based on low-cost standard components is presented together with the first evaluation results concerning positioning accuracy. View full abstract»

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  • Techniques for development of safety-related software for surgical robots

    Page(s): 261 - 267
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    Regulatory bodies require evidence that software controlling potentially hazardous devices is developed to good manufacturing practices. Effective techniques used in other industries assume long time scales and high staffing levels and can be unsuitable for use without adaptation in developing electronic healthcare devices. This paper discusses a set of techniques used in practice to develop software for a particular innovative medical product, an endoscopic camera manipulator. These techniques include identification of potential hazards and tracing their mitigating factors through the project life-cycle. View full abstract»

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  • Estimation of the stapes-bone thickness in the stapedotomy surgical procedure using a machine-learning technique

    Page(s): 268 - 277
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    Stapedotomy is a surgical procedure aimed at the treatment of hearing impairment due to otosclerosis. The treatment consists of drilling a hole through the stapes bone in the inner ear in order to insert a prosthesis. Safety precautions require knowledge of the nonmeasurable stapes thickness. The technical goal has been the design of high-level controls for an intelligent mechatronics drilling tool in order to enable the estimation of stapes thickness from measurable drilling data. The goal has been met by learning a map between drilling features, hence no model of the physical system has been necessary. Learning has been achieved as explained in this paper by a scheme, namely the d-σ Fuzzy Lattice Neurocomputing (dσ-FLN) scheme for classification, within the framework of fuzzy lattices. The successful application of the dσ-FLN scheme is demonstrated in estimating the thickness of a stapes bone "on-line" using drilling data obtained experimentally in the laboratory. View full abstract»

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  • Interactive 3D registration of ultrasound and magnetic resonance images based on a magnetic position sensor

    Page(s): 278 - 288
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    The use of stereotactic systems has been one of the main approaches for image-based guidance of the surgical tool within the brain. The main limitation of stereotactic systems is that they are based on preoperative images that might become outdated and invalid during the course of surgery. Ultrasound (US) is considered the most practical and cost-effective intraoperative imaging modality, but US images inherently have a low signal-to-noise ratio. Integrating intraoperative US with stereotactic systems has recently been attempted. In this paper, we present a new system for interactively registering two-dimensional US and three-dimensional magnetic resonance (MR) images. This registration is based on tracking the US probe with a DC magnetic position sensor. We have performed an extensive analysis of the errors of our system by using a custom-built phantom. The registration error between the MR and the position sensor space was found to have a mean value of 1.78 mm and a standard deviation of 0.18 mm. The registration error between US and MR space was dependent on the distance of the target point from the US probe face. For a 3.5-MHz phased one-dimensional array transducer and a depth of 6 cm, the mean value of the registration error was 2.00 mm and the standard deviation was 0.75 mm. The registered MR images were reconstructed using either zeroth-order or first-order interpolation. View full abstract»

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  • Analysis of trabecular bone structure using Fourier transforms and neural networks

    Page(s): 289 - 294
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    Hip fracture due to osteoporosis (OP) and hip osteoarthritis (OA) are both important causes of locomotor morbidity in the elderly population. In osteoporosis, bone mass gradually decreases until the skeleton is too fragile to support the body and a fracture occurs, typically in the femur, wrist or spine. In osteoarthritis, there is a proliferation of bone, leading to a stiffening of the tissue. Current clinical methods for assessment of bone changes in these disorders largely depend on assessing bone mineral density. However, this does not provide any information about bone structure, which is considered to be an equally important factor in assessing bone quality. This paper presents a novel approach for computer analysis of trabecular (or cancellous) bone structure. The technique uses a Fourier transform to generate a "spectral fingerprint" of an image. Principal components analysis is then applied to identify key features from the Fourier transform and this information is passed to a neural network for classification. Testing this on a series of 100 histological sections of trabecular bone from patients with OP and OA and a normal group correctly classified over 90% of the OP group with an overall accuracy of 77%-84%. Such high success rates on a small group suggest that this may provide a simple, but powerful, method for identifying alterations in bone structure. View full abstract»

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  • Author index

    Page(s): 1 - 2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Subject index

    Page(s): 3 - 7
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine publishes basic and applied papers of information technology applications in health, healthcare and biomedicine.

 

This Transaction ceased publication in 2012. The current retitled publication is IEEE Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Yuan-ting Zhang
427, Ho Sin Hang Engineering Building, The Chinese
University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong
ytzhang@ee.cuhk.edu.hk
Phone:+852 2609-8458
Fax:+852 2609-5558