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IEE Review

Issue 5 • Date 16 Sep 1999

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Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • New star in orbit

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 201 - 205
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  • Bucking the trend

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 211 - 213
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  • The harmonious chipsmith [DSP chips for four-part singing synthesiser]

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 215 - 218
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (648 KB)  

    The authors describe how modern digital signal processing (DSP) chips and parallel processing have helped realise a real-time, four-part singing synthesiser. They have developed a singing system based on the SHARC digital signal processor from Analog Devices. Using DSP chips operating in parallel, this system readily supports the synthesis of multipart singing, allowing close harmony and choral textures to be achieved with or without supporting musical accompaniment View full abstract»

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  • Find that leak [digital signal processing approach]

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 219 - 221
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (636 KB)  

    Digital signal processing can help cut losses from leaking water mains. The authors explain how one new development, sponsored by Thames Water, is helping it in the battle to locate leaks more quickly and reliably. From the outset their aim was to develop a `virtual' instrument approach based on a standard personal computer (PC). In this way, as the knowledge base increases and further improvements are made, software upgrades can be implemented on the same hardware platform. The use of a standard commercially available sound card fits in with this approach. In practice the software development proceeded in two main stages: an initial programme of algorithm development, followed by real-time algorithm implementation and graphical user interface (GUI) View full abstract»

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  • Have VArs, can travel [relocatable static VAr compensators]

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 207 - 210
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (692 KB)  

    Privatisation has increased the pace of change on the UK's electricity transmission network. The author describes how, in this new climate, the relocatable static VAr compensator is helping to maintain system stability and security. Relocatable static VAr compensator requirements and design are discussed as well as operating experience View full abstract»

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  • Signing on the digital line [e-commerce]

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 222 - 225
    Cited by:  Patents (4)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (660 KB)  

    The dramatic expansion of the Internet, fuelled by the World Wide Web, has made the widespread use of electronic trading. or e-commerce, a serious possibility. Markets are certainly changing. but, in this `brave new world' certain essential principles still apply. To a greater or lesser degree, any commercial transaction relies on the twin functions of value and identity. Value is always present, represented by the need to pay for goods and services; identity is sometimes more of an option. If you're paying for something with cash, then the vendor isn't going to be too worried about your identity. Conversely, if you're using a cheque or credit card, then proof of identity can be very important indeed. In e-commerce, where all transactions are conducted cash-free and at a distance, then the issues of value and identity are absolutely crucial. This article looks at the secure management of identity and value within the context of Internet-based transactions, illustrated by examples drawn from the work of the e-commerce consultancy Consult Hyperion View full abstract»

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