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IEEE Annals of the History of Computing

Issue 4 • Oct.-Dec. 1999

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Displaying Results 1 - 14 of 14
  • Overcoming pilot-induced oscillations in the space shuttle

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):69 - 70
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  • Case 5,656: L.J. Comrie and the origins of the scientific computing service ltd.

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):70 - 71
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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  • Frederick Seitz and Norman G. Einspruch, Electconic Genie: The Tangled History of Silicon [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):81 - 82
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Thomas P. Hughes, Rescuing Prometheus [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s): 82
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Jeffrey Young, Forbes' Greatest Technology Stories [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):82 - 83
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Michael E. Hobart and Zachary S. Schiffman, Information Ages: Literacy, Numeracy, and the Computer Revolution [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):83 - 84
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The early computers of Italy

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):28 - 36
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3364 KB)

    Computers were first introduced in Italy in 1954. In that year, four different projects started virtually at the same time. The four projects were aimed at either constructing computers from scratch or installing and making operational computers built in the United States and the United Kingdom. This article describes the history of these four Italian projects: the origin of every project, its goa... View full abstract»

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  • W. Stanley Jevons, Allan Marquand, and the origins of digital computing

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):21 - 27
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1804 KB)

    While there are many works about the development of computers, there is surprisingly little that focuses on early initiatives in digital computing. This article describes and elaborates on some of the early developments in digital computing. The logical machine of W. Stanley Jevons, for instance, interested others. The most promising offshoot was the work of Allan Marquand, who conceived of an ele... View full abstract»

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  • Flyable TRADIC: the first airborne transistorized digital computer

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):55 - 61
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3300 KB)

    The article describes the Flyable TRADIC research project from inception through flight test. It includes technical descriptions of the design as well as the author's personal recollections of those early days of stored program control. This work was done while the author was with Bell Telephone Laboratories, which at that time was the research and development arm of AT&T and now is the resear... View full abstract»

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  • Project Mercury's man-in-space real-time computer system: “you have a go, at least seven orbits”

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):37 - 48
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1468 KB)

    Project Mercury was the first US venture to send a man into space. The project lasted 55 months, involved more than 2 million people, and cost more than $400 million. In retrospect, Project Mercury's real time computer programming, and data processing aspects seem a minor element of the total project. Historical accounts of Project Mercury do not say much, if anything, about its computer based act... View full abstract»

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  • Command and control, documentation, and library science: the origins of information science at the University of Pittsburgh

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):4 - 20
    Cited by:  Papers (12)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3704 KB)

    This article describes the history of the first information science department formed in the United States-at the University of Pittsburgh-and the roles of two of its principal faculty members: Allen Kent and Anthony Debons. In particular, it looks at the origins of the program in command-and-control systems, documentation of scientific literature, and library automation View full abstract»

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  • Leo Wenzel Pollak (1888-1964): Czechoslovakian pioneer in scientific data processing

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):62 - 68
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1220 KB)

    A few years ago, the author wrote a report about the development of the Hollerith Punched Card System (F.W. Kistermann, 1995). One section dealt with the application of punched cards in science and engineering. Looking at the literature of this field in Europe, the author found the name of Leo Wenzel Pollak in Prague in the 1934 Hollerith Nachrichten, the customer journal of the Berlin DEHOMAG Com... View full abstract»

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  • The earliest solid-state digital computers

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):49 - 54
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2192 KB)

    In the years before 1947, many, if not most, engineers had the idea that it was physically impossible for a solid to amplify electrical signals. After Bell Labs demonstrated that this idea was wrong, how would engineers and managers go about bringing the new amplifying device up to the level of usability of the vacuum tube? How would its unique characteristics be exploited? How would we convince t... View full abstract»

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  • IBM field engineering experiences: a personal memoir

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):72 - 76
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    The article discusses the author's experiences as an IBM field engineer, starting from 1956, when he was given the job of servicing IBM 704 computers. The historical developments at IBM, the training courses the author attended, his career progression and some personal experiences are outlined View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Annals of the History of Computing serves as a record of vital contributions which recount, preserve, and analyze the history of computing and the impact of computing on society.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Nathan Ensmenger
Indiana University, School of Informatics & Computing
nensmeng@indiana.edu