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Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

Issue 9 • Date Sept. 1999

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Displaying Results 1 - 8 of 8
  • 14th Annual Battery Conference on Applications and Advance [Conference report]

    Page(s): 7 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (356 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Designing Plants

    Page(s): 15 - 17
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (265 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
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  • Integrated microsystem for 3D magnetic field measurements

    Page(s): 43 - 46
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    We present a portable battery-operated 3D magnetic microsystem (magnetodosimeter), intended for monitoring worker exposure to magnetic fields, in particular, working environments such as hospitals or physics laboratories. The proposed microsystem is based on a multichip module containing three equal channels for the three components of the magnetic field measurement, a microprocessor and a memory. Each single-chip channel detects the magnetic field, converts it into the digital domain and delivers the result to the microprocessor by means of an on-chip serial interface. The single-chip channel, fabricated in a 0.8 μm CMOS technology, is sensitive to magnetic fields ranging from -200 mT to +200 mT, achieving 12 bits of resolution and 11 bits of linearity. View full abstract»

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  • The Network Vehicle-a glimpse into the future of mobile multi-media

    Page(s): 27 - 32
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    The Network Vehicle is the Delphi Automotive Systems' vision for the future convergence of computers, the communications infrastructure, and the automobile. It features many advanced functions such as: satellite video, Internet access, virtual navigation, remote vehicle diagnostics and control, games, mobile office, automotive web site, and customized real-time stock quotes and sports scores. These features are enabled by an integrated planar antenna that is capable of multiple satellite reception, a client-server network architecture, and unique human-vehicle-interfaces such as color reconfigurable head-up and head-down displays, steering wheel controls, voice recognition, text-to-speech, and large touch screen active matrix liquid crystal displays (LCDs). The software applications are written in Java, using Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) to reduce the complexity and cost of the source code View full abstract»

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  • COTS based open systems for military avionics

    Page(s): 37 - 42
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    The DoD has many acquisition programs that are aggressively implementing open architecture principles in new avionics systems. Since “open” is an unclear attribute, projects eventually give in to a point solution that has no flexibility to cost effectively keep up with rapid changes in technology. The Open Systems Development Initiative (OSDI) project utilized COTS products to study the feasibility of building an open system that has plug-and-play capabilities. Lessons learned from the AV-8B Open Systems Core Avionics Requirements (OSCAR) and the F/A-18 Advanced Mission Computers and Displays (AMC&D) programs clearly indicated that understanding the underlying interfaces is crucial to keeping the system as open as possible to take advantage of the rapid changes in technology. A matrix of Key Open Standard Interfaces (KOSI), called the KOSI matrix, was developed and an applicable standard was identified for each interface. A list of non-conforming interfaces was also identified and the use of extensions or wrappers was investigated in an attempt to comply with standards. Standardization, rather than optimization of such interfaces, was considered more beneficial. It became evident that, with the exception of ruggedization, there is no difference in the use of COTS products for either commercial or military systems. Performing a KOSI analysis helped identify the key interfaces and standards, thus enabling the OSDI system to be scalable, portable and interoperable. A good KOSI matrix provides a vehicle for clear communication and helps systems integration and technology insertion to be less painful than what it is today. It helps reduce time-to-market and provides guidance to systems engineers and vendors to keep the system open View full abstract»

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  • Selecting a programming language for your project

    Page(s): 11 - 14
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    Since the mandate was dropped that the Ada language had to be used in all DoD projects, software managers have had more freedom to choose which programming language to use on their DoD projects. For most new DoD software projects that need a general purpose high-level language, Ada, C, or C++ are the main contenders, with increasing attention paid to the new language celebrity, Java. Furthermore, multilanguage systems seems to be getting increasingly popular. As a result, companies offer integrated multilanguage programming environments. Although each programming language has its own strengths and weaknesses, the reason for choosing a particular language may ultimately be based on factors having nothing to do with the technical merits of the language itself. Such factors may include the availability of compilers for the host/target, the maturity and efficiency of available compilers, the availability of programmers who already know the language, whether the language can easily interface with existing systems such as graphical user interfaces or data bases, the existence of legacy software written in a specific language, or how well the language fits in with adopted COTS products. A few common misconceptions that may affect the choice of a programming language are listed View full abstract»

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  • A pilot-centered autoflight system concept

    Page(s): 3 - 6
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    Ease of use has become a primary concern in avionics recently. Pilot training time represents a significant cost to aircraft operators, and the importance of human factors considerations in safety has been highlighted by the FAA, who notes that human error is a cause in roughly 70% of aircraft accidents. These concerns have led to a new focus on human-centered design, which seeks to define system functionality based on the user's perspective rather than that of the designer. We have used the principles of user-centered design to develop a new autoflight system concept that integrates the autopilot and flight management system functions into a single user interface that most pilots can learn to use within about fifteen minutes. This is in contrast to the weeks required to learn a typical flight management system View full abstract»

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  • Making batteries last longer [for electric vehicles]

    Page(s): 19 - 21
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    The early 1900's era of electric cars ended because the batteries didn't last long enough, and a new gasoline-engine-powered car cost less than a replacement battery. Long-life batteries are the key to achieving a low life-cycle cost for the electric vehicles that will help solve the air-pollution problem in our cities. New ways of making batteries last longer are discussed View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles and tutorials concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Teresa Pace, PhD EE
Chief Engineer SenTech
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