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Network, IEEE

Issue 5 • Date Sept.-Oct. 1999

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Displaying Results 1 - 8 of 8
  • Integrated and differentiated services for the internet

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 7
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (120 KB)  

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  • Performance analysis of an RSVP-capable router

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 56 - 63
    Cited by:  Papers (20)  |  Patents (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1012 KB)  

    RSVP is a bandwidth reservation protocol that allows distributed real-time applications such as videoconferencing software to make bandwidth reservations over packet-switched networks. Coupled with real-time scheduling mechanisms built into packet routers, the network guarantees to provide the reserved bandwidth throughout the lifetime of the applications. Although guaranteed services are of great value to both end users and carrier providers, their performance cost, due to additional control and data processing overhead, can potentially have a negative impact on the packet throughput and latency of RSVP-capable routers. The goal of this article is to examine the performance cost of RSVP based on measurements from an industrial-strength RSVP implementation on a commercial IP router. The focus is on the detailed evaluation of the performance implications of various architectural decisions in RSVP. We found that RSVP's control messages do not incur significant overhead in terms of processing delay and bandwidth consumption. However, the performance overhead of real-time packet scheduling is noticeable in the presence of a large number of real-time connections. In extreme cases, the performance guarantees of existing real-time connections may not be kept, and some best-effort packets are actually dropped, although the overall bandwidth requirement from these connections is smaller than the available link bandwidth View full abstract»

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  • A case for relative differentiated services and the proportional differentiation model

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 26 - 34
    Cited by:  Papers (64)  |  Patents (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1168 KB)  

    Internet applications and users have very diverse quality of service expectations, making the same-service-to-all model of the current Internet inadequate and limiting. There is a widespread consensus today that the Internet architecture has to extended with service differentiation mechanisms so that certain users and applications can get better service than others at a higher cost. One approach, referred to as absolute differentiated services, is based on sophisticated admission control and resource reservation mechanisms in order to provide guarantees or statistical assurances for absolute performance measures, such as a minimum service rate or maximum end-to-end delay. Another approach, which is simpler in terms of implementation, deployment, and network manageability, is to offer relative differentiated services between a small number of service classes. These classes are ordered based on their packet forwarding quality, in terms of per-hop metrics for the queuing delays and packet losses, giving the assurance that higher classes are better than lower classes. The applications and users, in this context, can dynamically select the class that best meets their quality and pricing constraints, without a priori guarantees for the actual performance level of each class. The relative differentiation approach can be further refined and quantified using the proportional differentiation model. This model aims to provide the network operator with the “tuning knobs” for adjusting the quality spacing between classes, independent of the class loads. When this spacing is feasible in short timescales, it can lead to predictable and controllable class differentiation, which ore two important features for any relative differentiation model. The proportional differentiation model can be approximated in practice with simple forwarding mechanisms (packet scheduling and buffer management) that we describe View full abstract»

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  • Internet2 QBone: building a testbed for differentiated services

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 8 - 16
    Cited by:  Papers (25)
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    The Internet2 project is a partnership of over 130 U.S. universities, 40 corporations, and 30 other organizations. Since its inception, one of the primary technical objectives of Internet2 has been to engineer scalable, interoperable, and administrable interdomain QoS to support an evolving set of new advanced networked applications. Applications like distance learning, remote instrument access and control, advanced scientific visualization, and networked collaboratories will allow universities to fulfill their research and education missions into the future, but only if the network QoS these applications require can be ensured. To meet this challenge, the Internet2 QBone initiative has brought together a dedicated group of U.S. university and federal agency networks, international research networks, engineers, researchers, and applications developers to build a testbed for interdomain IP differentiated services. This article presents the engineering motivations behind DiffServ and its adoption by Internet2, provides an overview of the QBone architecture, and describes its anticipated deployment, including plans for a trial inter-domain bandwidth brokering architecture. Security aspects are considered togethered together with an inter-bandwidth broker reservation signaling protocol View full abstract»

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  • Web server support for tiered services

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 64 - 71
    Cited by:  Papers (62)  |  Patents (16)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (964 KB)  

    The evolving needs of conducting commerce using the Internet requires more than just network quality of service mechanisms for differentiated services. Empirical evidence suggests that overloaded servers can have significant impact on user perceived response times. Furthermore, FIFO scheduling done by servers can eliminate any QoS improvements made by network-differentiated services. Consequently, server QoS is a key component in delivering end to end predictable, stable, and tiered services to end users. This article describes our research and results for WebQoS, an architecture for supporting server QoS. We demonstrate that through classification, admission control, and scheduling, we can support distinct performance levels for different classes of users and maintain predictable performance even when the server is subjected to a client request rate that is several times greater than the server's maximum processing rate View full abstract»

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  • Intradomain QoS routing in IP networks: a feasibility and cost/benefit analysis

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 42 - 54
    Cited by:  Papers (19)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1192 KB)  

    Constraint-based routing gradually becomes an essential enabling mechanism for a variety of emerging network services such as virtual private networking and QoS support. A number of previous works have recognized its significance and investigated many aspects of the operation of constraint-based routing and in particular its variant concerned with determining paths for requests with specific QoS requirements, known as QoS routing. In this work we build on previous results on the cost of QoS routing and investigate the performance/cost trade-offs involved in the operation of a representative QoS routing architecture, elaborate on the constituents of this cost, and identify the main methods for containing the cost that QoS routing incurs on routers. Our results show that the cost of QoS routing is not excessive and that there indeed exist operational configurations, which can achieve reasonable performance gains with only a minimal increase in processing cost when compared to conventional best-effort routing View full abstract»

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  • A policy framework for integrated and differentiated services in the Internet

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 36 - 41
    Cited by:  Papers (14)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (592 KB)  

    We examine the issues that arise in the definition, deployment, and management of policies related to QoS in an IP network. The article provides an overview of requirements for QoS policies, alternative policy architectures that can be deployed in a network, different protocols that can be used to exchange policy information, and exchange of policy information among different administrative domains. We discuss current issues being examined in IETF and other standards bodies, as well as issues explored in ongoing policy-related research at different universities and research laboratories View full abstract»

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  • Providing Internet access: what we learn from INDEX

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 18 - 25
    Cited by:  Papers (16)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (880 KB)  

    The Internet demand experiment, or INDEX, is a market and technology trial. Its objective is to determine how much users value different qualities of service for Internet access. Findings from the trial imply that today's system of flat-rate pricing by ISPs is very inefficient. Flat-rate pricing wastes resources, requires light users to subsidize heavy users, and hinders deployment of broadband access. INDEX is a prototype of an alternative ISP model that offers differentiated quality service on demand, with prices that reflect resource cost. In this alternative ISP consumers pay less, suppliers increase profits, and the deployment of broadband access is facilitated View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Network covers topics which include: network protocols and architecture; protocol design and validation; communications software; network control, signaling and management; network implementation (LAN, MAN, WAN); and micro-to-host communications.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Xuemin (Sherman) Shen, PhD
Engineering University of Waterloo