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Computer

Issue 9 • Date Sept. 1999

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • Collaborative computing: the next millennium

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 66 - 71
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (346 KB)  

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  • The myth of the educational computer

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 36 - 42
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (540 KB)  

    To dispel the delusion that the computer by itself can educate, the author believes computer professionals need to press for reforms that properly exploit digital technology in the classroom. He feels that the current computer-as-educator delusion is harmful and yet seems to go largely unquestioned, even by computing professionals. Despite the fact that good technical work is being done to develop... View full abstract»

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  • Leveraging distributed software development

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 59 - 65
    Cited by:  Papers (6)  |  Patents (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (480 KB)  

    The Internet has been changing the way people collaborate on software development, offering certain advantages but also creating new requirements. Internet based collaboration does make a wider base of talent available, but the development cycles running at Internet speeds require maintaining higher levels of precision. From a project management perspective, communication is a key factor in Intern... View full abstract»

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  • A framework for online learning: the Virtual-U

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 44 - 49
    Cited by:  Papers (22)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (964 KB)  

    Much of the online post-secondary education available in North America and Europe has been created piecemeal. This situation arose because educators began adopting computer networking in the mid-1970s, soon after the invention of packet-switched networks (1969) and e-mail and computer conferencing (1971) for exchange of scientific information. In late 1993, the author set out to help design a syst... View full abstract»

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  • Managing software productivity and reuse

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 111 - 113
    Cited by:  Papers (20)  |  Patents (27)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (196 KB)  

    Your organization can choose from three main strategies for improving its software productivity. You can work faster, using tools that automate or speed up previously labor-intensive tasks. You can work smarter, primarily through process improvements that avoid or reduce non-value-adding tasks. Or you can avoid unnecessary work by reusing software artifacts instead of custom developing each projec... View full abstract»

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  • Developing educational software components

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 50 - 58
    Cited by:  Papers (26)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (604 KB)  

    The demand for educational software is growing exponentially with the surge of interest in educational reform, the Internet, and distance learning. Educational applications must be flexible because curricula and teaching styles vary greatly among institutions, locations, and even among instructors at the same institution. To meet these needs, a wide array of small-scale, casual developers at unive... View full abstract»

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  • Managing music in orchestras

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 26 - 34
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (740 KB)  

    The typical orchestra manages a huge amount of information. A symphonic work's main score often runs to more than 100 pages, while an operatic score can run 600 or more. From the main score, the conductor draws some 15 to 30 different instrumental parts and distributes them to 40 or more lecterns so that 70 musicians can play from them during rehearsals and performances. This overhead increases si... View full abstract»

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  • Internet implications of telephone access

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 108 - 110
    Cited by:  Patents (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (276 KB)  

    What good is a network if it can't be accessed? In fact, access is often a single point of failure for data or telecommunications network subscribers. In the US, the Public Switched Telephone Network is the primary provider for the vast majority of voice service users. The PSTN is also the principal source of circuit-switched access to ISPs for an increasing number of PCs. Therefore, PSTN access a... View full abstract»

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  • Explore, excogitate, exploit: component mining

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 114 - 116
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (312 KB)  

    The author describes a process of component mining. His source of candidate components, or his “mine”, is a set of highly respected components from an earlier generation: the famous Unix utilities. He shows how to identify the most promising of these candidates and re-encapsulate them in components that satisfy today's views of component based development, based on the principles of ob... View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes peer-reviewed articles written for and by professionals representing the full spectrum of computing technology from hardware to software and from current research to new applications. 

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Sumi Helal
University of Florida
sumi.helal@gmail.com