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Evolutionary Computation, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date Sept. 1999

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Displaying Results 1 - 8 of 8
  • Guest editorial from biology to hardware and back

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 165 - 166
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Evolutionary Algorithms for VLSI CAD [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 251 - 253
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Genetic programming III: Darwinian invention and problem solving [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 251 - 253
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Real-world applications of analog and digital evolvable hardware

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 220 - 235
    Cited by:  Papers (65)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (692 KB)  

    In contrast to conventional hardware where the structure is irreversibly fixed in the design process, evolvable hardware (EHW) is designed to adapt to changes in task requirements or changes in the environment, through its ability to reconfigure its own hardware structure dynamically and autonomously. This capacity for adaptation, achieved by employing efficient search algorithms based on the metaphor of evolution, has great potential for the development of innovative industrial applications. This paper introduces EHW chips and six applications currently being developed as part of MITI's Real-World Computing Project; an analog EHW chip for cellular phones, a clock-timing architecture for Giga hertz systems, a neural network EHW chip capable of autonomous reconfiguration, a data compression EHW chip for electrophotographic printers, and a gate-level EHW chip for use in prosthetic hands and robot navigation View full abstract»

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  • Evolving oscillators in silico

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 197 - 204
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (156 KB)  

    We use evolutionary search to automatically find electronic circuits that oscillate, i.e., that periodically toggle an output line from low to high. Reconfigurable hardware in the form of field programable gate arrays (FPGA's)-as opposed to circuit simulation-computes a circuit's fitness which guides the evolutionary search. We find empirically that oscillating circuits can be evolved that closely approximate target frequencies specified a priori. Our evolved oscillators alias a harmonic of the target frequency to satisfy the fitness goal. Frequencies of the evolved oscillators are sensitive to temperature and to the physical piece of silicon in which they operate. Such sensitivities have negative implications for deployment of evolved circuits in conventional applications, but may have positive implications for adaptive computing. We observe that operating the FPGA's transistors at voltages below specification often increases the number and quality of evolved solutions View full abstract»

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  • Biomolecular computing and programming

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 236 - 250
    Cited by:  Papers (22)
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    Molecular computing is a discipline that aims at harnessing individual molecules at nanoscales for computational purposes. The best-studied molecules for this purpose to date have been DNA and bacteriorhodopsin. Biomolecular computing allows one to realistically entertain, for the first time in history, the possibility of exploiting the massive parallelism at nanoscales inherent in natural phenomena to solve computational problems. The implementation of evolutionary algorithms in biomolecules would bring full circle the biological analogy and present an attractive alternative to meet large demands for computational power. The paper presents a review of the most important advances in biomolecular computing in the last few years. Major achievements to date are outlined, both experimental and theoretical, and major potential advances and challenges for practitioners in the foreseeable future are identified. A list of sources and major events in the field has been compiled in the Appendix, although no exhaustive survey of the expanding literature is intended View full abstract»

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  • Explorations in design space: unconventional electronics design through artificial evolution

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 167 - 196
    Cited by:  Papers (53)
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    Three hypotheses are formulated. First, in the “design space” of possible electronic circuits, conventional design methods work within constrained regions, never considering most of the whole. Second, evolutionary algorithms can explore some of the regions beyond the scope of contentional methods, raising the possibility that better designs can be found. Third, evolutionary algorithms can in practice produce designs that are beyond the scope of conventional methods, and that are in some sense better. A reconfigurable hardware controller for a robot is evolved, using a conventional architecture with and without orthodox design constraints. In the unconstrained case, evolution exploited the enhanced capabilities of the hardware. A tone discriminator circuit is evolved on an FPGA without constraints, resulting in a structure and dynamics that are foreign to conventional design and analysis. The first two hypotheses are true. Evolution can explore the forms and processes that are natural to the electronic medium, and nonbehavioral requirements can be integrated into this design process, such as fault tolerance. A strategy to evolve circuit robustness tailored to the task, the circuit, and the medium, is presented. Hardware and software tools enabling research progress are discussed. The third hypothesis is a good working one: practically useful but radically unconventional evolved circuits are in sight View full abstract»

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  • A circuit representation technique for automated circuit design

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 205 - 219
    Cited by:  Papers (56)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (356 KB)  

    We present a method of automatically generating circuit designs using evolutionary search and a set of circuit constructing primitives arranged in a linear sequence. This representation has the desirable property that virtually all sets of circuit-constructing primitives result in valid circuit graphs. While this representation excludes certain circuit topologies, it is capable of generating a rich set of them including many of the useful topologies seen in hand-designed circuits. Our system allows circuit size (number of devices), circuit topology, and device values to he evolved. Using a parallel genetic algorithm and circuit simulation software, we present experimental results as applied to three analog filter and two amplifier design tasks. In all tasks, our system is able to generate circuits that achieve the target specifications. Although the evolved circuits exist as software models, detailed examinations of each suggest that they are electrically well behaved and thus suitable for physical implementation. The modest computational requirements suggest that the ability to evolve complex analog circuit representations in software is becoming more approachable on a single engineering workstation View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Transactions on Evolutionary Computation publishes archival quality original papers in evolutionary computation and related areas including nature-inspired algorithms, population-based methods, and optimization where selection and variation are integral, and hybrid systems where these paradigms are combined. Purely theoretical papers are considered as are application papers that provide general insights into these areas of computation.
 

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief

Dr. Kay Chen Tan (IEEE Fellow)

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

National University of Singapore

Singapore 117583

Email: eletankc@nus.edu.sg

Website: http://vlab.ee.nus.edu.sg/~kctan