By Topic

IT Professional

Issue 4 • Date July-Aug. 1999

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 10 of 10
  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Building digital metropolis: Chicago's future networks

    Page(s): 40 - 46
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (424 KB)  

    After Y2K, what's the best way to position your organization for e-commerce, information sharing, and resource use? Here's one city's plan. In 1997, the Metropolitan Planning Council of Chicago concluded that the digital network infrastructure was becoming vital to the health of the entire region. Yet the council also saw that infrastructure development was disjointed and likely to be incomplete. A thorough IT strategic plan, the council concluded, was overdue. The council turned to Northwestern University's Information Technology Division to analyze the situation and make recommendations. The report was to address not only the key issues but also how the digital network will become the newest universally available infrastructure in metropolitan Chicago. The report (http://www.nwu.edu/it/metrochicago) evolved from a series of papers by Northwestern faculty discussions and seminars with faculty and regional professionals, and research gleaned from across the country (USA). The report takes a look at the opportunities and challenges facing a global city when it decides to leverage its resources to position itself for the 21st century. What was found applies equally well to other regions and even to large companies, which also have information ecosystems, quality-of-life issues, and complex infrastructure requirements View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The directory-enabled enterprise

    Page(s): 14 - 17
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (116 KB)  

    The network directory, formerly just a background technology for storing resource and user profiles, is now becoming a powerful tool for policy-based management. New directory products can store policies to regulate how users and applications access network resources. And a new breed of directory services permits linking directories for global updates or to marshal resources for critical tasks. For example, storing access policies in directory objects, such as user names, could efficiently provide authentication and authorization for internal users and even extranet users. This promises to make directories a much more important technology for administrators, particularly as they increasingly seek to improve network management by more closely controlling the relationship between applications and resources View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Affordable ways to improve application development

    Page(s): 47 - 52
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (348 KB)  

    If an important client suddenly required that you conform to a process standard, could you afford to do so? Could you afford not to? The 3P Process Improvement Strategy is the answer. Two cases illustrate its benefits. In one case, a CMM Level 1 organization underwent a CMM based assessment for Internal Process Improvement less than one year after working with elements of 3P. The certifying agency found it compliant in all but one key process area, and the certification cost the company less than $100000 (US). In a second case, a small firm won a major procurement and has been vocal in crediting the win to efforts associated with the 3P strategy. The strategy derives its name from its core components: policies, processes, and products. The 3P approach is primarily pragmatic: it supports the notion that compliance with an established standard should serve as a sanity check, not an end in itself. Using 3P, you start with business and technical self-assessments, which lead directly to the improvement of a single process (or, if you have the resources, many processes). Your plans need not be elaborate, but must be complete. 3P provides a six-step program to help you monitor your progress. Monitoring is key: if you get commitment from your boss, yourself, and your team to honest assessment, the improvement program will yield long term benefits View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Building an enterprise architecture step by step

    Page(s): 31 - 39
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1208 KB)  

    For most organizations, getting started may be the hardest part of building an enterprise information technology architecture. One reason is that people have only a hazy idea of how to use a systematic architecting process to achieve specific goals. The entire idea of enterprise architecting seems grand and out of reach, so they feel more comfortable chipping away at it with patches. Unfortunately, these patches evolve to something only slightly more sophisticated. Some efforts never get that far. The architects get caught in a never-ending series of analyses and end up with nothing but a long to-do list just as the money runs out and the CEO expects to start seeing a return on investment. The article shows how to scope the project, set up the development team, and form a target architecture vision View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Surprising facts about implementing ERP

    Page(s): 65 - 68
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (260 KB)  

    An ERP environment emphasizes constant change and reassessment of organizational processes and strategic vendor alliances. Processes are standardized, but they aren't static. Unlike the legacy systems that inhibit making changes, regular ERP updates force change on already dynamic organizations. The real difficulty in implementing an ERP isn't because it's a new system or because it means making changes. The challenge is that it instills discipline into an undisciplined organization. And while it helps the organization as a whole respond to changes in market demands and customer needs, employees don't necessarily see this cultural change as an improvement View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Taking advantage of real-time collaboration tools

    Page(s): 25 - 30
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (692 KB)  

    The I'Net age (the combination of the Internet, intranets, and extranets) supports real-time or synchronous interaction. Synchronous interactions are those in which a response typically occurs in less than 10 seconds. Relying on a standard Java-enabled 4.x browser, many organizations are collaborating in real time on decisions, proposals, customer service, e-commerce, marketing documents, and more. As defined by our consultancy, Collaborative Strategies, the functionality of a real-time collaboration (RTC) tool resides between the phone and email. RTC tools help communicate graphical and text-based information in a synchronous fashion. To date, users have typically run interactive sessions in conjunction with a conference call, since voice over IP can have unreliable quality, especially over the Internet View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Get wireless: a mobile technology spectrum

    Page(s): 18 - 23
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (244 KB)  

    Mobile computing applications allow anytime, anywhere access to the Internet and corporate intranets. For several reasons, the market for wireless data services has grown at a much slower rate than wireless voice. Until recently, portable data devices were bulky, required heavy batteries, and didn't have integrated networking. Wireless services have also had to contend with narrow bandwidths, high access latency, and frequent disconnection. Added to this were inadequate coverage, expensive services, and perceived security problems. Finally, few applications were specifically designed with mobility in mind. New mobile technologies address these problems, making wireless data transmission an attractive alternative for individuals and enterprises. The next few years will see wireless data networks come into their own. Next year (year 2000), the market for wireless data networks is predicted to grow to six to eight million users with seven percent of the total wireless revenues. In fact, wireless data service is projected to be a multibillion-dollar market within five years. The combination of portable gadgets and wireless data services provides exciting opportunities for mobile computing applications View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The competitive edge of risk entrepreneurs

    Page(s): 69 - 73
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (276 KB)  

    Product cycles are too short; markets are deregulating too rapidly. Innovative products and services relentlessly flood the marketplace. Often fielded by previously unknown companies, these new products cause severe market turbulence and unexpected discontinuities. For companies to prosper in this competitive environment, merely improving the efficiency of processes will not substitute for lagging revenue growth. This is especially true for companies that depend heavily on IT. For them, it means finding innovative means to develop systems, such as adaptive development, lean development, and the like. It also means finding new ways to align business strategy and IT, ones that allow any misalignment to be corrected quickly. Only if a company knows how to take calculated risks will it survive in this competitive environment. This is where risk entrepreneurialism comes in. Risk-entrepreneurial companies aggressively pursue risks that others cannot, squander few opportunities, and exploit the mistakes of their competitors. They represent the most competitive form of business that exists. These companies rarely make mistakes, and when they do, they take corrective action immediately. They are constantly positioning themselves to anticipate innovation in their operating environment View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

IT Professional is a bimonthly publication of the IEEE Computer Society for the developers and managers of enterprise information systems.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
San Murugesan
BRITE Professional Services