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IT Professional

Issue 1 • Date Jan.-Feb. 1999

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Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
  • Mobilizing for Y2K: A status report

    Page(s): 19 - 22
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  • Advancing IT into the 21st century

    Page(s): 76 - 77
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    The progress of IT in the US is the direct result of federal investments. Advances in information technology will provide the basis for much of the world's economic growth as we head into the next century (2000). During the past five years (1994-9), production in computers, semiconductors, and communications equipment quadrupled at a time when total industrial production grew by 28 percent. In the coming decades, the opportunities for innovation in IT are larger than they ever have been-and more important. If the past is any guide, the most important advances will come from unexpected directions, facilitated by advanced technical capabilities that result from fundamental research. Thus, federal investments in basic, high risk research for IT will be even more essential to ensuring the intellectual and technical underpinnings for these as yet unforeseeable developments View full abstract»

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  • Community task forces help mitigate Y2K risks

    Page(s): 73 - 74
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    Several aspects of the Y2K problem are coming into focus. First, not all of the problems will be corrected in all the mission-critical systems. Second, failures could impact commerce, government services, power, communications, transportation, the economy, and other areas. Third, there is a growing concern that Y2K failures may cause havoc in our personal lives. Undoubtedly, millennium anxieties will grow and drive people to act. The issue is whether this action will be constructive or destructive. We have a choice. One perception is that Y2K failures will cause outages, shortages, and a host of other problems. Some people recommend stock-piling food, water, money, and even gold. It is becoming increasingly clear that acting in your own self-interest over the next year will ultimately hurt more than help. For example, each bank carries a small fraction of the cash held by its depositors; a run on banks could cause several to fail. A small percentage of the population buying a couple of weeks' worth of food could clear store shelves. Worst of all, citizens who ignore the Y2K issue until the last minute could panic. Community mobilization offers an alternative to these scenarios View full abstract»

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  • Help for cyberterrorism: Y2K's silver lining

    Page(s): 74 - 75
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    We have seen numerous concerted efforts to deal with worldwide problems that potentially affected everyone, such as world wars and health hazards. We are now witnessing a different kind of global mobilization to conquer the Y2K problem. To remedy the Y2K problem, IT departments throughout the world have had to direct enormous resources to perform an in-depth analysis of their computers. We have inventoried software, hardware, and applications; fixed code; replaced noncompliant components and embedded chips; and developed contingency plans. Contingency planning is a major endeavor to ensure continuity of operations even if Y2K bugs persist and cause a system failure. In all this planning is 1st January 2000 the ideal time for a terrorist to strike? So now, as we turn the corner on Y2K, I believe we need to focus on this other large problem: terrorism through cyberspace-cyberterrorism. I consider cyberterrorism to be the use of information technology to disrupt critical infrastructure. Y2K can pay dividends by helping us to protect that infrastructure View full abstract»

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  • The ins and outs of IT outsourcing

    Page(s): 11 - 14
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    Many IT managers are struggling with the question of whether and how to outsource various functions. Businesses of all sizes are seriously considering shifting some IT assets to a third party. In today's fast-paced IT environment, technology and skill sets change very quickly. In reality, IT managers have no choice but to prepare for a future that includes outsourcing. IT staff have long been pressured to cut costs. But now, they're also expected to discover new revenue streams. To meet these bottom-line objectives, IT managers must deal with change, manage complexity, and find skilled workers. That's where outsourcing is seen to greatly improve the efficiency of an IT operation View full abstract»

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  • When models collide: lessons from software systems analysis

    Page(s): 49 - 56
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    Sooner or later, the assumptions people make about what a system should do will conflict. Here's how to recognize it before it's too late. Systems analysis is rapidly coming of age. Many projects have successfully used a new approach called MBASE (Model-Based System Architecting and Software Engineering). The MBASE approach integrates the four common development models (success, product, process, and property) around the creation and use of a software architecture package. As analysts explicitly integrate models using MBASE, they can recognize and reconcile model clashes as a matter of course, instead of after the fact View full abstract»

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  • A big-picture look at enterprise architectures

    Page(s): 35 - 42
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    It makes sense to plan the growth of your information systems. But many attempts to create a road map start at the wrong level. Ensuring a consistent, coherent vision to direct the evolution of the enterprise's information systems is difficult enough with a development framework. Without one, it's impossible. The concepts we outline are just a task list in the work to establish an enterprise architecture, but they give you some idea of the breadth of the job ahead of you. However, we hope we've given you a start toward a more realistic vision of your enterprise architecture View full abstract»

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  • Supporting next generation Internet applications today

    Page(s): 29 - 34
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    Want to multicast real time applications over IPv4 without upgrading? Two protocols can help right now. New protocols are a response to the growing variety and volume of traffic on the Internet and intranets. The developers of IPv6 specifically refer to supporting a future in which low-power, handheld devices may tap into the Internet, as may refrigerators, soda machines, and electric meters. They acknowledge that any protocol developed will be viable only if it remains compatible with current standards and plans for incremental change-few companies can afford to change their systems all at once. Protocols such as IPv6, RSVP (Resource Reservation Protocol), and RTP (Real-Time Transport Protocol) are attempting to take the Internet into the future while meeting the needs of users today View full abstract»

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  • The cold realities of software insurance

    Page(s): 71 - 72
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    Is your company scrambling to assess its legal and financial vulnerability from online transactions or the Y2K problem? If so, you should know that insurance companies are now tentatively dipping into the waters of software liability. Amidst predictions of huge corporate liabilities and despite reports to the contrary, insurers are offering some coverage. Often, however, the coverage either does not completely protect business holdings or comes with hefty premiums. The availability of even limited, expensive coverage is a trend worth watching. To provide insurance, insurers must be able to accurately predict future disasters View full abstract»

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  • Basic intrusion protection: the first line of defense

    Page(s): 43 - 48
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    Making your system safe is no cinch, but here's a guide to getting started. The article examines various system security methods, including: identification and authentication techniques; firewalls; audit trails; and automated intrusion detection systems View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IT Professional is a bimonthly publication of the IEEE Computer Society for the developers and managers of enterprise information systems.

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San Murugesan
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