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Communications Magazine, IEEE

Issue 6 • Date June 1999

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Displaying Results 1 - 15 of 15
  • Testing of telecommunications hardware [Guest Editorial]

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 60 - 62
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Switching and transmission [Guest Editorial]

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 110
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Built in self test: a complete test solution for telecommunication systems

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 72 - 78
    Cited by:  Papers (4)  |  Patents (4)
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    The technological revolution witnessed by the telecommunications industry is leading to the development of new applications, products, and protocols, which in turn solicits widely accessible, highly reliable, and high-quality networks. To meet the stringent quality and reliability requirements of today's complex communication networks, efficient test methodologies are necessary at all levels (system, board, circuit, etc.). Conventional test methodologies are being constantly challenged by ever-increasing speed and circuit size, which results in high costs associated with test hardware, test generation, and test application time. Built-in self-test offers a test methodology where the test functions are embedded into the circuit itself. The advantages of using BIST for complex telecommunication systems are numerous. Reduced test development time, low test application time, eliminating the need for very-high-speed hardware testers, provision for at-speed tests, in-field test capability, and high fault coverage are some of them. In this article we present a tutorial on the BIST methodology targeted mainly toward telecommunication systems, the test structures necessary for its incorporation both at the circuit and system levels, and test implementation at the higher levels of design abstraction View full abstract»

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  • Applying ATM/AAL2 as a switching technology in third-generation mobile access networks

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 112 - 123
    Cited by:  Papers (19)  |  Patents (25)
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    In this article we focus on the transport and switching part of third-generation mobile access networks and outline some important aspects of applying ATM in these networks. In particular, we argue that in order for the mobile access network to support low-bit-rate delay-sensitive traffic consisting of short packets, the standardization of a new ATM adaptation layer, AAL2, and associated signaling protocol has been necessary. The AAL2 protocol has been designed to support low-bit-rate delay-sensitive services (typically compressed voice) where other adaptation layers fail to deliver the required QoS and maintain efficient resource utilization at the same time. Furthermore, in order to provide mobility and soft handover support in W-CDMA-based mobile networks such as UMTS or IMT-2000, there is also a strong demand for fast connection establishment and release. Therefore, when designing ATM-based cellular access networks some specific architectural and traffic management issues need to be addressed View full abstract»

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  • Test: shared problems and shared solutions

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 65 - 70
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    Test is a universal problem-common to all sectors of the electronics and IT industries. However, significantly different solutions have been required in the past-dictated by factors including the complexity of the product under test and the extent to which features to support test could economically be designed into the product. The latter was a particular problem at the integrated circuit level where, for a long time, the amount of circuitry available within each component was limited. Today, what were once large and complex systems are now single integrated circuits. It has become both economical and technically desirable to deploy test approaches that were once relevant only to, say, mainframe computers to the testing of circuit boards, integrated circuits, and even parts of integrated circuits. Put simply, “systems on silicon” demand system-oriented test approaches. The goal of this article is to illustrate this point and to highlight the commonalities between what at first glance may appear to be different approaches to test applied at different levels of integration View full abstract»

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  • Linking diagnostic software to hardware self test in telecom systems

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 79 - 83
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (2)
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    This article presents a novel approach to telecom system design that links hardware structural testing to system diagnostics software. Issues related to access of the hardware test features in the system are discussed. Linking the built-in self-test to diagnostic software reduces software complexity while increasing diagnostic accuracy. Furthermore, the use of structural test features in a routine diagnostic test permits subcritical faults to be detected and recorded in nonvolatile memory, thus facilitating failure analysis. It can then be seen that the superior test coverage, fault resolution, and flexibility that access to hardware test features gives, will be beneficial in improving overall system quality and reliability View full abstract»

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  • Reconstructing transmission networks using ATM and DWDM

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 140 - 145
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    TDM transmission and ATM switching have been established as two wide area core network technologies, operating separately but in conjunction with each other at different layers of the protocol stack. History shows that transmission networks have been reconstructed on a regular basis, and the reconstruction, based on fiber, SONET, and DWDM (dense wave division multiplexing), allows TDM transmission capabilities to be integrated with ATM switches, resulting in increased transmission efficiencies, effective bandwidth management, and greatly reduced capital, operational, and maintenance costs View full abstract»

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  • The evolution of the existing carrier infrastructure

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 134 - 139
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (12)
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    With the continuing explosion in data traffic, incumbent carriers have several alternatives in attempting to meet this demand. Carriers can either replace, overlay, or migrate their networks, and only a migration strategy provides a cost-effective and manageable solution View full abstract»

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  • Testing embedded memories in telecommunication systems

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 84 - 89
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (3)
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    Extensive system testing is mandatory nowadays to achieve high product quality. Telecommunication systems are particularly sensitive to such a requirement; to maintain market competitiveness, manufacturers need to combine reduced costs, shorter life cycles, advanced technologies, and high quality. Moreover, strict reliability constraints usually impose very low fault latencies and a high degree of fault detection for both permanent and transient faults. This article analyzes major problems related to testing complex telecommunication systems, with particular emphasis on their memory modules, often so critical from the reliability point of view. In particular, advanced BIST-based solutions are analyzed, and two significant industrial case studies presented View full abstract»

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  • The role of signaling in quality of service enabled networks

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 124 - 132
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    In this article we identify the common building blocks that enable some networks to provide better than best-effort transfer guarantees to the traffic they carry. We consider the role signaling plays in such a network and argue in favor of pinned routes, with a highly efficient pinning process, to improve network stability and to ease the task of maintaining QoS guarantees in the face of changing network characteristics, including failures; the use of broad QoS classes to determine the path that a particular flow should follow through the network; and providing the flexibility of specifying the detailed QoS for the flow, if needed, at any arbitrary time during the life of the flow. We conclude that a flexible signaling architecture is an essential enabling component of any QoS-aware network. We present an overview of the design and implementation of UNITE, as an example of a signaling architecture that embodies these attributes. More generally, we consider the relationship between QoS-related signaling and other protocols and mechanisms that may form part of an overall QoS-enabled network and service infrastructure View full abstract»

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  • Making complex mixed-signal telecommunication integrated circuits testable

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 90 - 96
    Cited by:  Papers (5)  |  Patents (3)
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    This article presents a discussion of several methods that can be used to improve the testability of complex mixed-signal telecommunication integrated circuits. We begin by outlining the role of test and its impact on product cost and quality. A brief look at the pending test crises for mixed-signal circuits is also considered. Subsequently, we outline the evolution of test strategies with time, and their corresponding test setups for verifying the function of the analog portion of a mixed-signal circuit. The article also describes several circuit techniques for improving test access and providing built-in self-test solutions for telecommunication circuits View full abstract»

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  • Challenges in testing core-based system ICs

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 104 - 109
    Cited by:  Papers (25)  |  Patents (2)
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    Advances in semiconductor design and manufacturing technology enable the design of complete systems on one IC. To develop these system ICs in a timely manner, traditional IC design in which everything is designed from scratch, is replaced by a design style based on embedding large reusable modules, the so-called cores. Effectively, the design of a core-based IC is partitioned over the core provider(s) and the system-chip integrator. The development of tests should follow the same partitioning. We describe the differences between traditional and core-based test development, and present an overview of current industrial approaches. We list the future challenges regarding standardization, tool development, and academic and industrial research View full abstract»

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  • An architecture for self-test of a wireless communication system using sampled IQ modulation and boundary scan

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 98 - 102
    Cited by:  Papers (27)  |  Patents (2)
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    An architecture for system-level self-test of a wireless communication transceiver integrates the functional (parametric) self-test of the radio frequency subsystem, and the structural self-test of the digital subsystem. The digital subsystem is tested using extensions of the IEEE 1149.1 boundary scan standard to verify connections within circuit boards and between boards. The RF subsystem is tested using a loopback connection between the RF transmitter and receiver. An RF parametric self-test is performed using a digitally modulated signal (as opposed to a sinusoidal tone) as the test stimulus, and using samples from the receiver digitizer as test data. This loopback test scheme imposes a relatively small overhead on the RF system design View full abstract»

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  • Packet data over cellular networks: the CDPD approach

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 152 - 159
    Cited by:  Papers (11)  |  Patents (2)
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    Cellular digital packet data is a mobile packet data technology that operates on the spectrum assigned to a telephone cellular network, such as the Advanced Mobile Phone Service. This article undertakes a thorough survey of the CDPD radio interface and explores the main functional layers of this interface. Specifically, it extensively studies the physical layer, the data link layer, and the subnetwork-dependent convergence protocol, and explains their semantics and functional characteristics. Furthermore, it emphasizes several significant aspects such as the medium access procedure, the forward and reverse channel configurations, the data multiplexing scheme, and the channel hopping procedure View full abstract»

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  • Internet over direct broadcast satellites

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 146 - 151
    Cited by:  Papers (17)  |  Patents (13)
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    High-powered direct broadcast television satellites can be used to broadcast high volumes of data directly to home terminals. Using the telephone network or a similar low-speed network, an asymmetrical system can be implemented which offers interactive Internet services. Two such interactive data broadcast systems are described which have been implemented as demonstration platforms for interactive multimedia services; one is based on digital subcarrier techniques for analog television channels, the other on the MPEG-2 and DVB standards. The architecture of the hardware and software is presented, particularly the solutions available for carrying Internet datagrams over MPEG-2 transport systems. A multicast transport protocol with selectable reliability is described which is the basis of a generic distribution application. It exploits the potential benefits of direct broadcast satellites for delivering data to large groups of local caches View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Communications Magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications systems (PCS), ISDN, and more.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Osman Gebizlioglu
Huawei Technologies