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Information Technology in Biomedicine, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date June 1999

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Displaying Results 1 - 10 of 10
  • Guest editorial

    Page(s): 82 - 83
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Evaluation of telemedical services

    Page(s): 84 - 91
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    With the rapidly increasing development of telemedicine technology, the evaluation of telemedical services becomes more and more important. However, professional views of the aims and methods of evaluation are different from the perspective of computer science and engineering or from medicine and health policy. We propose that a continuous evaluation strategy should be chosen which guides the development and implementation of telemedicine technologies and applications. The evaluation strategy is divided into four phases in which the focus of evaluation is shifted from technical performance of the system in the early phases to medical outcome criteria and economical aspects in later phases. We review the study design methodology established for clinical trials assessing therapeutic effectiveness and diagnostic accuracy and discuss how it can be adapted to evaluation studies in telemedicine. As an example, we describe our approach to evaluation in a teleconsultation network in ophthalmology. View full abstract»

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  • Telemedicine and terminology: different needs of context information

    Page(s): 92 - 100
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    Traditionally, communication between healthcare providers, including the provision of physicians with information and knowledge, works quite well because there are implicitly common conventions and assumptions in the collaboration of all involved actors. The basic prerequisite of the communication process between humans is a mutual agreement on syntax and semantics of oral and written language, i.e., of the medical sublanguage. With telemedicine, i.e., the use of telecommunication and informatics in medicine, this prerequisite is no longer sufficient. First, various professionals from different clinical communities, characterized by specialty, nationality, school, etc., share the management of the patient's health. Second, electronically communicated information is more and more intended for processing by computer applications rather than for direct interpretation by human users. Third, the interconnection of distributed heterogeneous software systems in medicine raises the issue of semantic interoperability, especially the problem of data integration. A faithful communication in such a scenario must be based on explicit assumptions behind a message. Interpreting an usually highly context-dependent utterance demands for mechanisms on a pragmatic level in natural language processing. The need for additional processing and integration of the transferred data by the receiving system demands for standardization and mediation, taking into consideration contextual knowledge that cannot entirely be explained and processed with linguistic and terminological approaches. This paper describes different categories of contexts and also different needs of applications concerning context awareness. View full abstract»

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  • Telecommunication in healthcare for a better coordination between hospitals and GP's: routine application of the "ISAR-Telematics" project

    Page(s): 101 - 108
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    With the development of new information and communication technologies, the nature of data exchange between healthcare professionals is modified by the use of telematics tools. With the implementation of the "Reseau Sante Social" of the smart cards CPS and Sesam-Vitale, hospitals and private clinics are installing their hospital information systems, while general practitioners are computing their patient records. The environment is therefore suitable for the installation and diffusion of telematics services, allowing a better exchange of information between the physicians of a geographical sector. The RITHME intercommunication platform was developed in the ISAR-Telematics and IRISI European projects. It ensures several communication functions, such as movements of patients (in/out/inside) the hospital, management and mailing of letters and reports, specific information on prescribed treatments, or data concerning the hospital structure. This platform is tested in the town of Armentieres in the large city of Lille (North of France). It is being routinely used to accelerate and secure data exchanges between all the physicians working in this area. View full abstract»

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  • Tactical audio and acoustic rendering in biomedical applications

    Page(s): 109 - 118
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    Complexity of biomedical data requires novel sophisticated analysis and presentation methods. Sonification is used as a new information display in augmented reality systems to overcome problems of existing human-computer interfaces (e.g., opaque or heavy head-mounted displays, slow computer graphics, etc.). A novel taxonomy of sonification methods and techniques is introduced. We present our experience with tactical audio and acoustic rendering in biomedical applications. Tactical audio as an audio feedback is used as support for precise manual positioning of a surgical instrument in the operating room. Acoustic rendering is applied as an additional information channel and/or warning signal in biomedical signal analysis and data presentation. View full abstract»

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  • Alignment of adjacent picture frames captured by a CLSM

    Page(s): 119 - 124
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    Mosaicking a picture from its adjacent parts (called picture frames or tiles) is encountered in different fields of research and technology, e.g., photogrammetry, remote sensing, microscopy, etc. It is applied whenever the object of investigation is too large for the field of view of the sensor, e.g. a microscope, We describe mosaicking with a confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM) Bio-Rad, MRC 600 (U.K.). Aligning neighboring picture tiles was accomplished by registering the overlapped border areas of these tiles. Such registration procedures are constrained by: the limited size of the registered samples (windows); anisotropy of the form of the windows (usually narrow rectangles); and the content of the windows, including changes of their intensity scale. Focusing on the latter problem, methods of registration were discussed and the robustness of the following three similarity based methods was studied with regard to the distortions of the intensity scales of the tiles to be registered: the sum of absolute valued differences (SAVD); normalized correlation coefficient (NCC); and the mutual information function (MIF). Pilot experiments were extended to three-dimensional (3-D) stacks of pictures encountered in the framework of 3-D object rendering and visualization. MIF was found in most cases to be the most robust; however, it also demanded the most computational power. It is discussed how to choose a cost-effective method of the registration with regard to the content (texture, contrast, intensity scale distortion) of the tiles. View full abstract»

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  • Rapid automated tracing and feature extraction from retinal fundus images using direct exploratory algorithms

    Page(s): 125 - 138
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    Algorithms are presented for rapid, automatic, robust, adaptive, and accurate tracing of retinal vasculature and analysis of intersections and crossovers. This method improves upon prior work in several ways: automatic adaptation from frame to frame without manual initialization/adjustment, with few tunable parameters; robust operation on image sequences exhibiting natural variability, poor and varying imaging conditions, including over/under-exposure, low contrast, and artifacts such as glare; does not require the vasculature to be connected, so it can handle partial views; and operation is efficient enough for use on unspecialized hardware, and amenable to deadline-driven computing, being able to produce a rapidly and monotonically improving sequence of usable partial results. Increased computation can be traded for superior tracing performance. Its efficiency comes from direct processing on gray-level data without any preprocessing, and from processing only a minimally necessary fraction of pixels in an exploratory manner, avoiding low-level image-wide operations such as thresholding, edge detection, and morphological processing. These properties make the algorithm suited to real-time, on-line (live) processing and is being applied to computer-assisted laser retinal surgery. View full abstract»

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  • Interactive 3-D virtual colonoscopy system

    Page(s): 139 - 150
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    We describe a low-cost three-dimensional (3-D) virtual colonoscopy system that is a noninvasive technique for examining the entire colon and can assist physicians in detecting polyps inside the colon. Using the helical CT data and proposed techniques, we can three-dimensionally reconstruct and visualize the inner surface of the colon. We generate high resolution video views of the colon interior structures as if the viewer's eyes were inside the colon. The physicians can virtually navigate inside the colon in two different modes: interactive and automatic navigation, respectively. For automatic navigation, the flythrough path is determined a priori using the 3-D thinning and two-pass tracking schemes. The whole colon is spatially subdivided into several cells, and only potentially visible cells are taken into account during rendering. To further improve rendering efficiency, potentially visible cells are rendered at different levels of detail. Additionally, a chain of bounding volume in each cell is used to avoid penetrating through the colon during navigation. In comparison with previous work, the proposed system can efficiently accomplish required preprocessing tasks and afford adequate rendering speeds on a low-cost PC system. View full abstract»

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  • AIM: attentionally based interaction model for the interpretation of vascular angiography

    Page(s): 151 - 157
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    We propose a model to interpret neurovascular X-ray angiogram (XRA) images interactively. This attentionally based interactive model (AIM) exploits human interaction as part of the solution. AIM posits two channels of interaction: context (what to look for) and focus-of-attention (where to look) as the locus of spatial information exchange between the user and the machine. In an AIM system, the user specifies a context (e.g., a carotid vessel) and directs the attentional spotlight to focus machine processing. AIM involves the user with the computer as integral partners and facilitates varying degrees of human intervention in the process. A hierarchy of context abstractions permits the system to function more autonomously (doing high-level tasks like extracting an arterial vessel) in routine interpretation and to require more user intervention (e.g., locating arterial wall boundaries) as the image complexity increases. This is especially important in medical imaging where the medical professional must have ultimate control and confidence in the system. Such technology can have a significant impact on the design of radiological systems. View full abstract»

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  • Telemedicine in the United Kingdom: current status and future prospects

    Page(s): 158 - 159
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    The objective of this correspondence is to present an overview of some of the current developments and some of the ongoing telemedicine programs in the United Kingdom. The issues of the future integration of telemedicine activities within the National Health Service that promise better access to healthcare with higher efficiency, mobility, and lower cost are also discussed. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine publishes basic and applied papers of information technology applications in health, healthcare and biomedicine.

 

This Transaction ceased publication in 2012. The current retitled publication is IEEE Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Yuan-ting Zhang
427, Ho Sin Hang Engineering Building, The Chinese
University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong
ytzhang@ee.cuhk.edu.hk
Phone:+852 2609-8458
Fax:+852 2609-5558